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CHICAGO, MAY, 1917 




A Covenant of Patriotism 

I love my country and put unshakable 
faith in her character and in her mis- 
sion. * * Whatever I can do to increase 
love and reverence for my country and 
her flag I shall freely and fearlessly and 
joyously do. Above all partisanship 
and self-interest I solemnly place my 
country, promising to pray for Amer- 
ica, to support America and to honor 
America by my character and my works. 
This pledge I make in humble depend- 
ence on the Qod of my fathers, whose 
favor alone has made our country great. 
— WiWam 1. Ellis, Ph. D. 




Number 1 




OFFICIAL ORGAN* NATIONAL CHRlJTJAN AJJOCIATION 
10 CZHTS A COPY EJTABUJHED 1868 i.00 AY^AR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

PMbllshed Monthly by the National Christian 



JAMES EDWIN PHILLIPS 
MafMicHno Editor. 

850 West MadicMi Street, Chicafi^o. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
mcmthe, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe lor the Cbristian Cynosure to be sent 
to liftOCNDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
.larly authorised by the recipient, we will 
iBalce a HtieRiorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piratiOB, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. PhlHips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Bntered as Second- class matter May 19, 1897, 
at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., und^ Act of 
March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



A Covenant of Patriotism, by William T. 

Ellis, Ph. D Cover 

Annual Meeting, National Christian Asso- 
ciation 1 

The Recessional, by Rudyard Kipling 2 

Elk Sunday Cabarets — The Elks- Antler . . 2 
A K. of C. Cornerstone Laying — The 

Fortnightly Review 2 

Kiddo Temple 2 

Blackhand Bomb Ruins Shop 2 

W. O. W. Convention at Waco, by B. M, 

Holt .3 

W. O. W. Troubles— T/t^ Dallas Wood- 
man 3 

Lone Scouts of America. 4 

Eagle Insurance 4 

"The Poor Eel," by A. P. Hutchison 5 

"Extravagant" Gambling — The Elks-Antler 5 
Masonic Spies — The American Freemason 5 

Receiver for Royal Arcanum 6 

Obligation, Royal Arcanum 6 

Masonry Has No Fetish — The American 

Freemason 6 

"I said in My Haste," by Pres. C. A. 

Blanchard 7 

Daughters of the Scottish Rite 10 

Rescued by a "Church Fellow" — Sunday 

School Times 10 

"The Stoneman and Chicago" — Watchman- 
Examiner 10 

Public Dancing in Schoolhouses, by Wil- 
bur F. Crafts 11 

Lodges Protest Paying Taxes — /. O. O. F. 

Lodge Record 12 

Hunt for Maccabee Thief 12 

Blue Goose Elects 12 

Why I Left the Minor Orders, by Charles 

J. Goodman 12 

The Berean Band 13 



Catholics Escort MdiSons— The Keystone- 
Tyler 17 

Murder "All Right," Say L W. W 14 

Teachers' Federation Loses 15 

New Labor Party in Britain 15 

Gompers Would Curb Supreme Court 16 

A "Movie" of the Unions— From the Daily 

Press 17 

John Quincy Adams, Letters of.......... 19 

Obituary : Bishop Milton Wright 23 

Editorial : 

The "State of War" 20 

Narrowness of Freemasonry 21 

Odd-Fellow "Charity" 21 

Concomitants 22 

A "Secret" Society 23 

Lost Cipher Keys 24 

Book Notice— The Holy Spirit 24 

News of Our Work: 
,An Old Time Revival, by A. D. Qine. . 25 
A Seceder's Reasons, by H. J. McKin- 

ney 25 

Eastern Secretarv's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 26 

Report of Southern Agent, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson 26 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 27 

From Elder G. B. Crockett 28 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 
GENERAL OFFICERS. 
President Rev. D. S. Warner ; vice- 
president, Rev. Thomas M. Slater; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Keilogi:; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomms C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kil- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Lea- 
man, George Slagcr and Ww I. Philfipt. 



LECTURERS. 



Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th S<t, 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Qemens, Box 96, 
Ubce, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, EUcndale, N. D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck, (kafton, CaHf. 

Eld. G. B. Crockett. Dermott Ark. 



Vol. L, No. 1. 



CHICAGO 



May, 1917 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—^cts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 
him : I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have 1 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 



Annual Meeting, National Christian Association. 
Monday, May 28th, 1917, in the 

First Reformed Church, Rev. John F. Heemstra, Pastor. 
Cor. Michigan Avenue and 107th Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

The Annual fleeting of the National Christian Association will convene Mon- 
day, May 28th, 1917, at ten o'clock A. M. There will be three sessions. 

Every one interested is cordially invited to attend. Delegates from churches 
and other religious bodies, as well as members of the Association, are entitled to 
all of the privileges of the meeting. 

In addition to the usual annual business there will be a number of short 
addresses from members of the Board of Directors; and also short testimonies 
from those who have been Masons or Odd-Fellows, or Knights of Pythias, or 
Woodmen of the \Vorld and other lodges. 

Rev. E. G. Cryer, District Elder of the Free Methodist Church, and Rev. 
John F. Heemstra, pastor of First Reformed Church, and Williston P.. Stod- 
dard, Eastern Secretary, will give addresses. 

Music wall be provided by the choir of the First Reformed Church. 

D. S. W'akxkk. President. 
A\'. T. PiiiLi.i rs. Secretary. 

Directions 

Take car No. 4 (Michigan and 119th st.) on JVahash Arcnuc and get otT at 
107th street.- The church is on the southwest corner of Michigan avenue and lojlh 
street. 

Those coming to Chicago from the south on tlie IlHnois Central. Michigan 
Central or ''Big Four Route" trains will get off at Pullman and take the trolley 
cars going west on iiith street and transfer north on Michigan aveniK- to loyih 
street. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



LONE SCOUTS OF AMERICA. 

Last month we gave our readers a 
sketch of the Lone Scouts of America, 
an organization for boys, somewhat pat- 
terned after the "Boy Scouts." 

In the last paragraph of the article we 
said: "It will seem unfortunate to those 
who have scruples against secret orders 
that the nomenclature of the lodge, such, 
as "degrees." "lodges," etc., has been em- 
ployed in this organization, which appar- 
ently is not a secret society in intent or 
practice." 

^^'e are in receipt of a letter from Mr. 
Harold Hall, who represents the Lone 
Scouts for Mr. Boyce, the founder, in 
which he says: "It may be as you say, 
that the terms used in several places in 
Lone Scout literature may give some 
parents the impression that the organiza- 
tion is like a secret society. You are cor- 
rect in concluding that there is no ele- 
ment of secrecy in the organization. 
Some of the literature was made up in a 
hurry.' and it may have been that suffi- 
cient regard was not given to this possi- 
bility of misunderstanding." And then 
he goes on to say that he has taken the 
matter up with Mr. Boyce and that they 
are "planning to remove any possible 
cause of misunderstanding." 



EAGLE INSURANCE. 

The Eagles, like other lodges suffering 
from indifference and lapses on the part 
of many of their members, appointed a 
committee at their last national gather- 
ing at Savannah, Georgia, "to consider 
means for lessening the number of lapses 
and increasing the membership" of the 
order. 

The committee has reported a recom- 
mendation that the order branch out 
into the life insurance business, by which 
they figure will not only prevent 
lapses, but will furnish an incentive to 
many to join, and will establish some 
sort of tie between the Grand Aerie and 
members of Aeries whose charters are 
revoked or have been surrendered. 

As the premium rates are not yet 
formulated, we can not tell whether the 
insurance will be of the usual question- 
able, fraternal type, or of an adequate 
conservative sort. 



The report of the committee is as fol- 
lows : 

"Your Commission created by the 
Grand Aerie at Savannah to consider 
means for lessening the number of lapses 
and increasing the membership, after 
considering most exhaustively the vari- 
ous measures presented, unanimously 
recommend that the Grand Aerie organ- 
ize arid maintain a life insurance depart- 
ment for insuring members in good 
standing in Subordinate Aeries, who may 
wish to take out insurance ; provided 
that an efficient organization and a safe 
insurance, in harmony with the funda- 
mental piu'poses of this Order, can be 
established and satisfactorily maintained ; 
and provided, further, that the present 
rights, privileges, duties and benefits of 
members not wishing to take such insur- 
ance shall in no wise be altered or af- 
fected." 



"THE POOR EEL." 

Butler, Pa., March ist, 1917. 

Prof. J. R. Millin, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Dear Mr. MilHn: I write to protest 
against your pernicious (opposition to 
oathbound secret lodges and brother- 
hoods. 

It is plainly written that "He hath 
made of one blood all them that dwell 
on the earth," but it is not said, nor does 
it follow that He hath made all equal in 
the matter of backbone. There are men 
whose fiber is not strong. Their chins 
retreat, because they cannot face the 
battle. Their hearts are affected by 
fatty degeneration. Their livers have a 
pallid cast. They have chicken oil in 
their gall bladder. Their red corpuscles 
are yellow. The vertebrae which goes 
with a normal spinal cord was omitted 
from their make-up. Their backbone is 
like a Chinese cue. They cannot help 
themselves. They were made that way. 
When they were made, iron for the 
blood and lime for the bone and fiber 
for the heart, was only to be had in 
small quantities. Such unfortunates 
cannot stand alone. They have to be 
propped up. 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



It is all well for a man like you to 
talk against lodges, and to talk up 
churches, but what about the poor eel 
who doesn't have the lime and iron and 
fiber? For him the lodge is an absolute 
necessity. He must have something to 
prop him up. This is why the cripple 
and the deformed and the young man in 
his nonage and the old man in his dotage 




are not taken in ; instead of propping 
somebody else they would have to be 
propped. 

This is why lodge oaths are made so 
strong; it takes a closer cask to hold 
goat's milk than syrup. This is the rea- 
son also for the sealed doors ; the many 
and great secrets which lodge men are 
covenanted to keep are very thin and 
would leak out. And this is why Deism 
is the religion of the lodge. Anybody 
can be a Deist, but Christianity requires 



martyr stuff and there is none of it in 
the lodge ; or at all events it cannot be 
kept therein. Hence, quit kicking. "W'e 
that are strong ought to bear the infirmi- 
ties of the weak," and are not our lodge 
men weaklings who cannot stand alone? 
]\Iost truly yours, 

A. P. Hutchison. 



"EXTRAVAGANT" GAMBLING. 



Elk Official Issues Warning. 

"The attention of this office has been 
called by district deputies to the fact that 
gambling, of an extravagant character, is 
being indulged in in a considerable num- 
ber of subordinate lodges, and that, in 
spite of warnings issued by deputies, it 
continues. 

"This is for the purpose of notifying 
such lodges that thirty days from date a 
request will be made of all district depu- 
ties that they furnish this office with a 
list of the lodges within their jurisdic- 
tions that continue to offend, and imme- 
diate endeavor will be made to forfeit the 
charters of such lodges on that ground." 
— From "Official Circular No. 2" of the 
Grand Exalted Ruler, in The Elks- Ant- 
ler, February, 19 17. 

Why this warning about "extravagant 
gambling"? Apparently any form of 
gambling in an Elk lodge goes, so long 
as the bleating of the fleeced does not 
reach the ears of the "lambs'' outside. 



MASONIC SPIES. 

Here is a curious statement, credited 
to Brother Elmer E. Rogers, of Chicago, 
writing under title of "The Masonic Spy 
or Traitor." "Some have become blas- 
ters, because of the greater opportunities 
for their nefarious work ; but our inves- 
tigations have proven that these spies or 
traitors quite generally work themselves 
into positions with salaries. Wt will not 
name one state in which the Secretary 
of the Grand Lodge of ]\Iasons had long 
made his living and reared his family on 
his Masonic wages ; at his death the fra- 
ternity was amazed to learn that his 
whole family were Roman Catholics ; his 
'Masonic brethren were not welcome at 
his funeral ! Served the fraternity 
right!" — TJie American Freetnason, 
March, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



RECEIVER FOR ROYAL ARCANUM. 

Boston, ]\Iass., April 17. — The Su- 
preme Council of the Royal Arcanum, 
which was placed in the hands of a tem- 
porary receiver Saturday, was author- 
ized by Federal Judge Aldrich to-day to 
continue business as a fraternal insur- 
ance organization pending final decision 
on the question of making the receiver- 
ship permanent. 

The active duties of Thomas J. Boyn- 
ton, temporary receiver, was suspended. 

Judge Aldrich announced he would ap- 
point a master to hear evidence and re- 
port findings of fact and law. 



OBLIGATION, ROYAL ARCANUM. 

'Tn the presence of Almighty God 
and these witnesses, I do, of my own 
free will and accord, most solemnly 
promise that I will strictly comply with 
all laws, rules and usages of this fra- 
ternity established by the Supreme Coun- 
cil of the Royal Arcanum. 

'T will hold allegiance to said Supreme 
Council and be loyal thereto, as the Su- 
preme authority of the entire Order. 

"T will obey all orders emanating from, 
the Supreme or Grand Councils, or from 
the Subordinate Council of which I am 
a member, so long as they do not con- 
flict with my civil or religious liberty. 

"1 will not defraud or wrong any 
department of this Order, or any mem- 
ber thereof, or suffer it to be done by 
others if in my power to prevent. 

'T will never introduce anything of a 
political or sectarian character at any 
meeting of, or in any way bring reproach 
upon this Order. 

'T will keep forever secret all that may 
transpire during my initiation, and will 
never improperly communicate to any 
person any of the words, signs, or 
tokens ; and should I be expelled or leave 
the Order, I will consider this obligation 
as binding out of it as it is in it. 

'T will o^sist a distressed brother, or 
his family when in distress, as far as 
in my power, without material injury to 
myself or family. 

"I will answer all proper signs of the 
fraternity, and use all proper means to 
protect a brother from defamation. 

''And should I violate this my solemn 



promise, I hereby consent to be expelled 
from this fraternity; and may God aid 
me to keep and perform all of these obli- 
gations." 

The above obligation is printed as a 
part of application for membership 
which the applicant is required to sign 
previous to initiation. The application 
blank says that no one will be received 
who does not believe in "a Supreme Be- 
ing," and that Mongolians, neither of 
pure nor mixed blood, no matter what 
they believe, are eligible. 



All aboard for Chicago, May 28th, to 
attend the Annual Meeting of the Na- 
tional Christian Association. 



MASONRY HAS NO FETISH. 



The Holy Bible Is on a Level With Writ- 
ings of Confucius. 

There are some survivals of the stone 
age still to be found in American Ma- 
sonry. Some of these have severely 
criticised the scholarly and broad-minded 
Grand Master of Massachusetts. This 
latter official recently and rightly ruled 
that when and where non-Christian pe- 
titioners for the degrees were obligated, 
under charter from the Grand Lodge of 
Massachusetts, the sacred books of such 
petitoners might properly be used. The 
question arose over the establishment of 
a lodge in China under dispensation 
from the Grand Master of the Bay State 
jurisdiction. The very object of the ob- 
ligation would be defeated and its sa- 
credness destroyed had the decision re- 
quired for those of other religions that 
the Christian Bible be used. Fetishism 
has no place in Masonry. The Jewish- 
Christian volume is a part of the most 
meaning furnishings of our Lodges; it 
will and should remain upon our altars ; 
but to thrust it upon others for whom it 
has neither sacredness nor binding force 
is to make of Masonic initiation a farce. 
— The American Freemason, March, 
1917. 



Any of our readers who may wish for 
additional reading matter along religious 
lines of a non-sectarian character, should 
write to Z ion's Watchman, Butler, Ind., 
for a sample copy. 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



-I SAID IN MY HASTE." 

By President C. A. Blanchard, Wheaton College, Illinois. 



Those familiar with the Word of God 
will readily attribute this title to David 
who said, ''I said in my haste all men 
are liars." Some of them will probably 
remember the remark made by a Scotch 
preacher who, after announcing his text, 
said, 'Tndeed, David, you might have 
said that, quite at your leisure." This re- 
mark was cynical and is not repeated as 
an example but as a suggestion. 

■ A friend of mine has recently told me 
that a minister recently speaking on the 
subject of secret societies said that the 
Christian church was, in its beginnings, 
distinctly an organization of that char- 
acter. He declared that it had grips, 
signs and pass words and, as I under- 
stood my friend, intimated that these 
were like the grips, signs and pass words 
of the lodges of our day. 

I very much dislike to think that a 
Christian minister would deliberately say 
what he knows to be untrue. I am not 
ready to make this criticism on the min- 
ister whose remark was reported to me, 
but the statement is so obviously false 
that I greatly dislike to think of anyone 
who is a Christian making it, most of all 
a Christian minister. 

There were plenty of secret societies 
in the days when the church was being 
begun. They existed in India, Egypt, 
Greece and Rome. They had certain 
well defined characteristics concerning 
which all who desire may easily inform 
themselves. Their places of meeting 
were frequently caves — they were dark 
and sepulchral in character. 

The ceremonies of initiation involved 
artificial thunder, lightning and other 
methods of terrtifying the candidate. In 
these initiations, just as in initiations of 
our own time, men were sometimes 
driven insane and at other times killed 
by nervous shock. Those who unlaw- 
fully witnessed these ancient ceremonies 
were, according to the rule, to be killed. 
Those who unlawfully made known the 
secrets were likewise to suffer death. 

Associated with these ^'mysteries" as 
they were called, there was almost uni- 
versal licentiousness. The meetings were 



held at night, as lodge meetings are, and 
the orgies were indescribable. It was 
concerning these secret societies that the 
Holy Spirit spoke when through Paul he 
warned men against fellowship with 
them, saying, "Have no fellowship with 
the unfruitful works of darkness but 
rather reprove them for it is a shame 
even to speak of the things which are 
done of them in secret." All these facts 
may be ascertained from any fairly com- 
plete dictionary of antiquities. 

The Christian church, as all -Christian 
people ought to know, was in every re- 
spect the opposite of these lodges. The 
meetings, whenever possible, were held 
openly. When the early Christians were 
in danger of being killed, if they met 
openly, beyond doubt they met in private 
but they had to be driven to caves and 
dens of the earth. They never sought 
such places of their own. volition. The 
people who drove them there would have 
murdered them if they could. Frequent- 
ly they did. That, in such a time and 
under such circumstances, there should 
be secret methods of recognition adopted 
was one of the most natural things that 
could have occurred. Good men who 
are not fools do not g"enerally commit 
suicide. 

For a minister to take this perfectly 
natural and obvious fact to associate the 
early church with the lodges of its day 
and to justify the secret societies of our 
own time, is a sin which must be re- 
pented of before it will be forgiven. . I 
do not know that these words will reach 
the mind of a single one who has been 
guilty in this manner. I fear not. Such 
persons I do not think generally put 
themselves in the way of information, 
but it is true none the less that for such 
shameless dealing with the early church, 
the men responsible will be held in ac- 
count. 

The Princely Knights. 

I was recently in a Christian confer-- 
ence and one day at noon time sat at 
luncheon with several clergymen. One 
of them had on a badge which was new 
to me and I asked him what it signified. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



He said it was the badge of the Princely 
Knights. I asked him who the Princely 
Knights are, and he said that they are a 
secret society which four ministers in his 
town, he being one of the four, were 
organizing. I asked what the principle 
of this organization was, and he replied 
that it was to help the boys to be good 
and manly. To prevent them from say- 
ing and doing the things which were ob- 
jectionable. I asked if they had an ini- 
tiation ceremony and he replied that they 
did : if they had oaths or obligations, and 
he said. Yes ; if they had prayers, and he 
said, Certainly, I sat in dumb amazement. 
He seemed to be a good man; I be- 
lieve he was. I have not the slightest 
doubt that he was really trying to do a 
good work for those lads that he was 
getting into his secret society, but what 
must be the effect upon the boys and 
what must be the effect upon the church 
of Jesus Christ by such a transaction as 
this ? 

The natural result will be that every 
one of those boys will join other secret 
societies. All the time, all the money, 
all the interest wdiich is devoted to the 
secret societies w-ill be so much with- 
drawn from possible investments in the 
Christian church. If the lads join the 
church, which some of them no doubt 
will do, they will have a divided interest. 
They will probably, most of them, be 
more interested in the lodges and orders 
which they joined than in the prayer 
meetings and the services of the church. 

Our Lord said that no man could serve 
two masters, that he would either love 
one and hate the other or cleave to one 
and despise the other, and as a sort of a 
comment on the whole situation, he said, 
Y^ou cannot serve God and mammon. 
That is, you cannot serve God and the 
world, but the effort of these orders and 
lodges is always to do both. They have 
titles, regalia, fun and obligations of as- 
sistance which are distinctly worldly in 
character. They have also prayers, 
scripture readings, moral instruction and 
the like which are ostensibly Christian in 
character. Unsaved men who have no 
spiritual discernment look at this com- 
pound of religion and worldliness as a 
most admirable thing. They say with- 
out hesitation that the lodge is better 
than the church. I w^ould be afraid even 



to guess how many men have said this 
to me. Certainly scores and possibly 
hundreds, and where one man says this 
in words, a hundred say it by their ac- 
tions, which speak the louder. 

Who Pays the Bill? 

A friend recently WTote me, complain- 
ing that some one had criticized a friend 
of his for being a lodge man. There was 
no question about facts, the only question 
was about the criticism. I said to him in 
substance, I know your friend and es- 
teem him highly for many good qual- 
ities. I think it fair, however, to pass 
one most important criticism on his con- 
duct. He is supported by Christian peo- 
ple, he is ostensibly laboring for the or- 
ganization which pays him a salary and 
gives him his standing in society, yet he 
has been accustomed, when he stands up 
to speak, to swing a large Knight Tem- 
plar badge in the face of his audience. 
He is a good speaker but I think that his 
badge talks much louder than his words. 
It is a public commendation and an ob- 
vious argument for Freemasonry. Now I 
do not criticize men for being Masons if 
they are so ignorant of the character of 
the order that they can conscientiously be 
such ; I justify them. If I were like them 
I would belong to it myself. What I do 
object to is that men should be sup- 
ported by the church and should be ad- 
vertising the lodge. 

Wherever this gentleman goes this 
badge has been accustomed to go along, 
and wherever the badge goes the lodge 
gets an advertisement. It seems to me 
obvious that this is not fair dealing. I 
think if he wishes to be an advertiser of 
the Masonic lodge he ought to be sup- 
ported by the lodge. I do not doubt he 
will get little presents from them, but 
that they pay him in ten years anything 
like as much as humble, self-denying 
Christians do in one, I do not believe. 
Why should he not work where he gets 
his money? Of course he would say 
that he does and I admit that in words 
he does, but I insist that his real service 
is rendered more to his lodge than it is 
to the organization which sustains him, 
and this I claim is unfair dealing. Men 
ought to be willing to put themselves at 
the complete service of organizations 
which furnish them their daily bread. 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



This is not simply good Christianity, 
this is good sense and ordinary fair 
dealing. 

I have been told of another boys' so- 
ciety recently organized in Philadelphia* 
I have seen notice of it once or twice ; 
how many thousands of members they 
had ; what splendid processions they got 
up ; what lovely exercises they do, etc. 
Only this morning, I think it w^as, one 
of the papers which I opened spoke of 
still another lodge, The Ancient Order 
of Gleaners, organized in 1894. I un- 
derstand it to be a secret order gotten up 
by men for the purpose of selling char- 
ters and degrees to farmers and perhaps 
making other incidental gains. What is 
to be the end of this sort of a thing? 
Obviously there is no end. 

I was talking recently with a gentle- 
man in a little town where the church 
w^as planted by abolitionists, opponents 
of lodges and temperance men. For near- 
ly seventy-five years that church has 
been supported by that sort of people 
and has done a great work, being asso- 
ciated with every interest of the kingdom' 
of God. This gentleman w^as telling me 
about the secret societies in that towai. 
"It is quite strange," he said. "One se- 
cret order comes into town, the lecturers 
or agents slip around quietly from man 
to man and get the thing to booming. 
They get up some public entertainments 
of one kind or another and directly the 
whole town is agog. A few^ months pass 
and the interest wanes. The members 
do not attend except the little handful 
who run the machine and have some 
selfish aim to gratify. The ordinary peo- 
ple who have homes and business enter- 
prise and expect to earn an honest living 
do not turn out. 

"Then we find some other man slip- 
ping into town. He has a new badge and 
he has a new name for a new order. He 
explains how^ his order is better than the 
other orders and the same performance 
is repeated. He gets the initiation fees 
for the beginners and the order has quite 
a large interest for a short time before 
its ceremonies pall as the others did. 
Men get tired of trying to live on wind 
and they stay away. The result is that 
this order dries up and dies. Once in a 
while a lecturer will come around and 
revive it. He will get in a few mem- 



bers, perhaps they will have a dance or 
two, maybe get up a bridge party, but 
the thing will naturally die. Then will 
come in a new man with the new order, 
the new badge and new ritual and these 
poor souls who have been feeding upon 
husks which swine eat, go over the same 
])erformance and after a little while, the . 
worthy people among them will tire of it 
and they will then be read\- for another 
secret society." 

Meanwhile, wdiat do the ministers do ? 
Their sheep are being sheared and made 
into mutton. It would seem to be the 
duty of a Christian minister to save his 
sheep, but what is he generally trying to 
do? Evidently not trying to save his 
sheep. He takes no measures to protect 
them from these wolves wdio raven and 
devour. He is trying to shear off enough 
wool and to get enough mutton to keep 
himself and his family alive. In most 
instances he does not succeed very well. 
The rule is that he is perpetually dis- 
couraged and disheartened. After a 
while he tries to get a new^ church. 
Usually he succeeds in finding one, and 
the same sad story is repeated again and 
again. 

I am not saying that these people are 
bad people. Many of them are very 
worthy people, but they do not under- 
stand that, religiously, men must belong 
to God or Satan. They do not under- 
stand that prayers offered to Cjod which 
purposely omit the name of the Lord 
Jesus Christ are offered to the Devil, 
that the Devil receives them and answers 
them and that he spoils the souls of the 
people who offer them. 

We read in the prophecy of Ezekiel of 
the time when a man with a writer's 
inkhorn by his side went through the city 
to mark certain people. The people 
whom he w^as to mark were those who 
sighed and cried over the abominations 
that were wrought. It is not popular to 
sigh and cry in our day. It is popular 
to laugh and joke. The most popular 
man is usually the one who can tell the 
largest number of jokes and produce the 
most laughter. 

When the Eastland was overturned, 
sending nearly a thousand men. women 
and children into eternity in thirty min- 
utes of time, the persons who organized 
the excursion said. "Picnic! Picnic! You 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



are invited. A whaling good time and 
no Jonah." What a frightful thing that 
those who were sending nearly a thou- 
sand people to die in half an hour's time 
should crack a little small joke about the 
story of that old prophet who ran away 
from his duty, as so many prophets now 
run away from theirs. Would God w^e 
might have more sighing and crying. If 
we had, there would be more praying 
and if there were more praying there 
would be more power. 



DAUGHTERS OF THE SCOTTISH 
RITE. 

At the Scottish Rite Cathedral in 
Omaha was organized Friday afternoon 
the first club of the kind ever to be estab- 
lished in Nebraska, composed of the 
wives, mothers, sisters and daughters of 
Scottish Rite Masons — which means 
thirty-second degree Masons. The mem- 
bership is confined to the Northern Ne- 
braska district, taking in all the territory 
that lies north of the Platte river. The 
plan is a most unique one and meets with 
the approval of all Masons of the higher 
degrees in Omaha and out in the state. 
The club will be strictly a social affair, 
with no expense to the members, and will 
be operated entirely by the ladies. 

At the initial meeting over two hun- 
dred ladies were present. The officers 
of the club elected were Mrs. John E. 
Simpson, president ; Mrs. William Berry, 
vice president; Mrs. Z. D. Clark, secre- 
tary, and Mrs. F. C. Patton, treasurer. 
The only reason why a treasurer was 
elected w^as because the ladies plan to 
hold a few social events where a small 
charge will be made to raise money for 
purchasing silverware and chinaware. 
There are no dues, everything being free 
to the members. 

The cathedral is to be at the disposal 
of the members of the new club at any 
time they wish it, except when required 
by the Scottish Rite bodies. 

The club will consist of two divisions, 
one composed of ladies who desire to 
play cards and the other composed of 
w^omen who do not play cards, but will 
do fancy needle work. Light luncheon 
will be served the women at each meet- 
ing, there being two meetings each month. 
— Omaha World-Herald, January 17, 

1917- 



RESCUED BY A "CHURCH FELLOW." 

[Comment on John 6:26, by William H. 
Ridgevva}^ in "The Busy Men's Corner," Sun- 
day School Times, of Feb. 24, 1917.] 

Ye seek me . . . because ye ate of the 
'loaves, and were filled (v. 26). 

No doubt thousands join the church 
and "go through the motions" simply for 
the bread and meat, just as the scoffers 
charge. But you will please notice that 
it was not here that Jesus was so might- 
ily moved to cry, ''Woe unto you, hypo- 
crites" (Matt. 23:13, etc.). That impas- 
sioned outburst was for an entirely dif- 
ferent class. Here is the point for con- 
sideration. Why is it that "loaves and 
fishes," why is it that prosperity is con- 
nected with religion? Why don't men 
join clubs and orders and societies for 
"loaves and fishes"? They do? Well, 
any man who does so can't know very 
much. Sickness or accident or loss of 
any sort is certainly not prosperity. 

Coatesville has about every sort of or- 
der and secret society there is. I notice 
that when any of the members get "right 
hard up against it" they never fail to 
hunt up us church folks to help them 
away from "it" (Num. 22:6). Even as 
I write there is a member of one of the 
leading secret societies who has been ly- 
ing sick all winter. His wife also is sick. 
He sells machinery when he is well. 
There was a nice order he expected to 
get from a large concern in his town 
whose head man was a brother What- 
you-may-call-it. This secret society 
brother could have given the business to 
the sick man on an "even-Stephen" ba- 
sis, the commission on which would have 
been a godsend at this time. "Can't run 
sentiment into business," and the order 
went elsewhere. A "church fellow" who 
hardly knew the man, but who knew the 
dire need, came to the rescue, as usual. 



"THE STONEMEN AND CHICAGO." 

"And now it is announced that the 
Stonemen will advance on Chicago. It 
is high time for The Standard to sound 
a note of warning to the Baptists of the 
Middle West. The Standard has de- 
clared its position to be one of open- 
mindedness, but open-mindedness ought 
not to mean a disregard of facts. The 
Stonemen and Baptists have nothing in 
common. We are glad that The Conti- 
nent, a near neighbor to The Standard. 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



11 



speaks its mind unhesitatingly and une- 
quivocally. We quote in part an edito- 
rial entitled, 'Stonemen Mighty Little 
Good.' 

" 'The society, in fact, is merely what 
Mr. Stone makes it, and his chronic mys- 
teriousness prevents outsiders from 
guessing just what he intends to accom- 
plish through it. Indeed, his own mem- 
bers seem equally in the dark. Only 
after a vast deal of mystification was 
Mr. Stone crowded to confess that he 
was trying to attract men of non-Epis- 
copal connections to receive the confir- 
mation rites of the Episcopal church at 
the hands of one of its bishops. In 
Brooklyn, howxver, he hedged on this 
point and said any minister of any 
church might perform the ritual cere- 
monies required in his "third degree." 
But back in Philadelphia once more, Mr. 
Stone refused to admit to The Pitblic 
Ledger that he had sanctioned any 
change. A brotherhood dependent wholly 
on one man's domination is not, at best, 
the kind of thing that promises big re- 
sults for the general church of Christ; 
and when that one man proves so shifty 
and uncertain as Mr. Stone, it is no risk 
to dismiss his society as a phenomenon 
of only temporary and superficial inter- 
est.' " — Watchman-Examiner. 



PUBLIC DANCING IN SCHOOL- 
HOUSES. 

BY WILBUR F. CRAFTS. 

While there was excitement and con- 
sternation last summer when sharks ap- 
peared at our seaside resorts and de- 
stroyed precious lives, yet there are other 
sharks — in human guise — whose prey is 
precious souls. 

The amusement craze is so strong and 
family government and civil government 
both so weak, that neither parents nor 
police interpose to save the youth of the 
nation. 

The dance madness, now at its worst 
in alliance with drink in the high-toned 
cabaret, is an even stronger and more 
destructive part of this shark-filled gulf 
stream of amusement madness, which 
history warns us has been the chief 
destroyer of the great nations of the 
past, whose dying cry was ''bread and 
games." Nations have not died of free 



trade or free silver, but of free love; 
not of currency, and seldom of conquest 
save as they had first been weakened by 
moral cancer. 

In the face of the fact that the dance 
was shown to be the chief cause of moral 
lapses when a nation-wide investigation 
was made a few years ago, by the Inter- 
national Sunday-school Association 
through a "Commission on Safeguarding 
Adolescent Youth Against Moral Perils 
of the Community," our very school- 
houses are used for dances — first, school 
dances, despite the fact that many of 
the parents who pay the taxes belong to 
churches that forbid dancing, so that 
announcing a school dance is a case of 
state against church ; second, public 
dances, which prevent the otherwise 
wholesome use of school buildings in 
evenings for "social centers." Surely 
there is no dearth of dancing, that the 
state should provide it, and manifestly 
whatever amusements are provided in 
school buildings, erected by enforced tax- 
ation, should be both recreational and 
educational in harmony with Shakes- 
peare's lines : 

" 'Tis well to be amused; 
But when amusement doth instruction bring 
'Tis better." 

What is your duty, reader, in the 
presence of this nation-wide peril? Let 
no one say, I can not do anything to 
change this mighty current. You can at 
least shoot the shark that ventures in 
range of your gun. No mother sits idle 
in the presence of the paralysis plague. 
She uses daily the preventive antiseptics 
prescribed by the health boards. She 
becomes a vigilant watcher of her child's 
movements, and safeguards its general 
health. 

School boards have promoted dancing- 
only because parents opposed to it have 
not protested. The churches, with forty 
millions of members enrolled on their 
books, have the ability, and so the re- 
sponsibility to change the very currents 
of national thought and action. Even 
one million can do it. A\'ill you count 
one? Here is a good motto: 'T am but 
one, but I am one. I can not do every- 
thing, but I can do something. And 
what I can do I ought to do, and by the 



grace of God I will do. 



-Exchange. 



mi^i? 



A>C 



-T-x-r 



10- 



lOHiiES Pl^CTEST PAYING TAXES. 

' ■ JTominf Ji: J»de-?elio\v:5,,' >sys me -'. 
iT'. O. ±. l^on^t Jlecjyrd, J^pril. 1017. 
**aiid aBemMTs cc other iraiemal socie- 
Tie^ iram TarioiB seniais^ oi tiie siaie 
wd^ nresein ai i. heaxinsr held in tht 
Capitol a: JMhany p\. X.] on ^edne^ 
day. IMarct 7th. in opposition xc the 
pa=sm|: of a bill ^^rhici: would wipe irom 
the siauie book the law whizh rex-frnpis 
tite properiT oc inate-na: societies ±rom 
Tasatian.'" 

It armosi hrrag? teai^ xc tiie eyes to 
CDntempiaxe the siru^ies iiill of aTignisfa 
tirroiioi: wiud" tite xnHiion and a h al t 
C*dd-l^eliow5 iizv£ passed xn order xc> 
"siinceed m nx mrno ^" a xew iioines xor a 
-v?erT ^?Tr.a7^ xitimber of titeir ^^d and 
oipbans. as se: iarth in the ioliowrn^ 
paraETaph : 

'"Zf^zrrr Srand Srre judo^ ^1.. '• . 
liars: waE xhe irsi speaker, whc poinxed 
oin the iiarnsrdr this hiV if passed T^'ouid 
cause arranizaiioiif tha: after years of 
riard ttoti: iiad suczeeded in owning 
hnrme^ wiiici: under tiie preseni iaw^ are 
exempr ±rain xasanon. Tiie srope or tiie 
znamaDie ^^Qrn Trnirii i^ bein^ done i>y 
xite I^di:-5elLuw5 Tras xeierred xc and 
zirg^c a~ one of the se^^eral s^ool reasons 
wnv xhe hiL should xim i>errrnie ^ iaw. 
Iz the proposed hill T>eraTne efiecin^. 
ciiamaDte efions of lite l/dd-?"eliows 
am: other fraxernal organizaxions will he 
runaiiec anc Erear iiardshrr pur upon 
TTirm - who. wxtn tiie understanding tiiey 
would receive i>enenrs if they xieeded as- 
sistance. 1 n-mer tiEse organzzations. 

'Those whr m)D^ xn :a~vor of the hiL 
T^^ei^ A i. lATrrmr ni SirffaiD. Tepre- 
Bemmr the Taspa^^ers" I^eagxie of tiiar 
cir: mid se-i^eral ^enttenien whc repre- 
sented tiie Ta^jayer=' I^eague of trie 
crn- of 2\ew Torii.' 

How utteri:^- hearlisr for these lax- 
psvfTS: xc attempr xc i^ve tiif: luag^B ^sx 
tiieir siiare xoward tiie sinjpon of the 
o-oTerranenr tne same a.- otiier msurance 
conc-emi Some one mus: iiave xoic tnem 
tiar toe sc-calied ciiantier — sici: LKmems 
Old xofc homes, etc.. ane al mciuded in 
tiie xnemher s dues. 

"Cjt iieiiaif of the IMasons. Pas: Grand 
IMasrer Gsxies Sndlh of OneontE and 



HUKT PO^ V.Ar.r.ABF.f THIEF, 

l^v^s^3rIi.. X. H,. March Ji;— A warrani wsts 
issiied loda^- ior xhe arrest 01 5ienr}- ,l . Know}- 
xon, Tm a n cial jtecretarr of lEirreki. Tent. Order 
of thf IMaccabses. on a. charge of obtaininc 
mone} under iaist prerences. The jiolice sa} 
thai 3Z ieas: S?!^.f><A if involved. IKnDwhxm, whr 
ha? beer an otnrsr of the lod»e in this city 
idnce rB or^^mizatiDn *(• yearf ag-o. disa|>- 
psared ahoirr i^efc ^. the police announced, 
a nd HD Trace of hrm hzs ieen found. — iiosioti 
Tosi. l>5zn± 17. 1917. 



KLUi GOOSE IILBCTS. 
The ISlehraska Bine Goose, composed 
Dt Tnsixranre men. eiecxed the ioHowii^ 
oftireT? to serve xlQ July 1 . 19x8 : P. X. 
^aish. TUDSi royal ^Hnder : J. K. Morri- 
son. snpervBor of tisE iock : D. 51. Gal- 
iegiiffr. custodian of trie oDslinos : H. M. 
^xse. oiiardian of the pond : £. D. Mc- 
Call. keeper of the oniden dtods^ ^ot : 
C ±1. Sieikin. wieider of trie ^rood gnill. 
— Oniwic XfaiJ^ jK^^ms^ Jan. Jid.. 19x7. 



wsy : 1.Z7 



'Hx nsciNDs d: 



Pasr 'jTsnv Aiaster jonn J 
S^vr Xork Zity ai^^eared. 



.^_ ^nitton Di 



JimK IvTTii ij ntt- of Pytrii2£ Timoiigii " FTgnfU 
ship. 

Ahotn ten years a^C' a friend a^ed me 
xc i om trie l\ m giiis of JMhias lod^^ and. 
as T thougirr mghh - of him. and thinking 
XT x ni gitL he henehcial xc me. I consented 
and XDok the Tarious decrees, pamn^: 
with iiieen dollars ior xny experience. I 
asked one of trie iea drn g men as xc what 
pan Jesus Cirnsr had xn our iod^. and 
iie T-ephsfL that iie teiiered Crnist was a 
gDod xna x hm tiiat iie was not trie Son 
in God. and ihar sd tar as membersiup 
in tiie iodoe was cancemed. one need 
Dnlty ackncn^'iedge liis belief in a Su- 
preme Trprng Tile carousing and drink- 
ing "vriuch occurred after tiie regular 
meetmg' closed, the ritual and xormal 
ina>=ers. etc.. did not appeal xc me. so I 
lust OTOTped DUi. 

^sjins ^LDysl Arrammi ior iiisirrapcas. 

I next jomed trie iLoyBl Arcanum, and, 
as I sai^ n: trie auanerte, did not iiave to 
pay the dues. I wem intc> Ihis order tor 
the i*enehr of tiie insurance. Sowerver. 
m tune I ^ot tired of n and left tiiem. tor 
tiie same iimd of iiaii-iellDw-welkmet, 
cigar-smokiag- and mixed wcrridly cam- 
panionshix whici: I iad foimd in -ftie 
TCrti^ht^ of Pythias did not app^ to me 
25 a Gxrist^n. 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



13 



Tries a Compromise with Modern 
Woodmen. 

Some years ago I joined the Modern 
Woodmen for the insurance protection 
and attended one meeting. I thought I 
would pay the dues and not attend the 
meetings. I salved my conscience with 
the thought that there would be no harm 
in being a member on this basis. Then 
the thought occurred to me, 'Tf I cannot 
be loyal to the lodge, boost it hard, and 




**#r ^ 



try to secure new members, why should I 
be a member at all?" I wanted to be 
clear in the matter and have a conscience 
void of offence to all men, so I deter- 
mined to drop out and avoid these 
entangling alliances with the world. 
A Free Man in Christ. 
A lodge, to my mind, is a great insti- 
tution for the development of self- 
righteousness, to do good deeds in the 
name of humanity and not of our Lord 
and Saviour Jesus Christ. It endeavors 
to supplant the work of the Church, and 
to my mind is a dangerous counterfeit, 
as members of lodges frequently allow its 
services to take the place of divine wor- 
ship. God's children and the lodge folk 
cannot have fellowship, as we "are a 
peculiar people, zealous of good works." 
We are also told, in II Cor. 6:14-17, not 



to be unequally yoked together with un- 
believers and to be separate from them. 
I was convicted by the Holy Spirit that a 
man can not be free and in accord with 
God's will and still have this ungodly fel- 
lowship. For this reason I have left my 
lodges, and now have the satisfaction of 
knowing that I have done God's will in 
this matter. 

Charles J. Goodmax. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



God made a man out of a piece of 
clay and He can make one out of what 
is left of you if you will let Him. 



Knockers are those who try to cover 
their own faults by talking about the 
faults of others. 



THE BEREAN BAND. 

The Berean Band was formed for the pur- 
pose of promoting the habit of storing the 
memory with the Word of God. Every mem- 
ber is supplied each year w-ith a list of Bible 
verses for the year and is asked to memorize 
at least one verse each week, and to endeavor 
to influence others to do the same. The fol- 
lowing are some of the subjects and verses 
for 1917: God's Compassion, Psalm 86:15; 
Salvation Through Christ, John 3:17; The 
One Foundation, 1 Corinthians 3:11; Trans- 
formation by the Spirit, 2 Corinthians 3:18; 
Gracious Words, Acts 20:32; The Sabbath, 
Deuteronomy 5:12; The Son of Man Cometh, 
Matthew^ 25:13. In the list the verses are 
printed in full. This year they are in a handy 
little booklet suitable for carrying in pocket 
or purse. A contribution of 5 cents a year is 
made by every one who receives annually one 
of these lists, 7 cents if postage is required. 
Postage stamps may be used in remitting by 
mail. Membership involves no obligation ex- 
cept that of memorizing at least one of the 
verses each week and that of contributing the 
amount named for the expenses of the work. 
The attention of members is called to litera- 
ture that would be a help to them in their 
studv of the Word and in their work for 
Christ. 

The Band is international. The general 
secretary is Charles J. G. Hensman of Lon- 
don, the founder of the Band. The president 
of the American section for 1917 is Dr. Wm. 
Evans of the Bible Institute of Los Angeles; 
president-elect for 1918. Dr. C. I. Scofield. 
Many of the great leaders in the evangelical 
churches in Great Britain and the United 
States are identified with our Band and are 
earnestly aiding in its work. 

If you wish to become a meml)er of this 
Band of Bible lovers, send your request and 
a contribution of 7 cents to J. A. Gordon, 53(5 
South Hope street, Los Angeles, Cal., and 
you wmII receive the list of verses for 1917 
and further information regarding our Band 



14 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



and its work. If yon do not wish to be en- 
rolled as a member of our Band bnt would 
like to know more about it, send him your re- 
quest and 2 cents postage and he will gladly 
give vou the information desired. 



Anyone interested in a little deaf child can 
obtain free literature explaining approved 
methods of training deaf children from in- 
fancy to school age by writing to The Volta 
Bureau for the Increase and Diffusion of 
Knowledge Relating to the Deaf, 1601 Thirty- 
fifth street, N. W., Washington, D. C. This 
literature relates only to the training of little 
deaf children, not to medical treatment nor 
to the deafness that comes in later life. Age 
of child and other details are welcomed. 



CATHOLICS ESCORT MASONS. 

It ^vill be news to many of our readers 
to learn that at the memorial services in 
honor of the late Major Archibald Butt, 
one of the heroes of the Titanic dis- 
aster, and a Freemason, that the parade 
was participated in by many citizens, in- 
cluding the Masonic lodge and a body of 
Roman Catholic cadets. Commenting 
upon this, William F. Bowe, Grand Mar- 
shal of the Grand Lodge of Georgia, 
wrote a letter to a brother residing in 
Washington, a part of which was pub- 
lished in the Washington Star, which 
said : 

The remarkable fact of a body of 
Roman Catholic cadets being permitted 
by their priests to form part of an escort 
for a Masonic lodge is significant — either 
of a more liberal attitude of those priests 
toward Freemasonry, or of the deter- 
mination of at least some American- 
born Roman Catholics to disregard the 
silly fulminations of Pope and priest and 
meet us like men and brothers. The let- 
ter says : 

'T thought it would not be amiss to 
call your attention to one feature of the 
parade which might pass unnoticed. In 
the militar}^ line of the parade forming 
the escort for Temple-Noyes Lodge were 
the Sacred Heart Cadets, under com- 
mand of Capt. P. H. Rice. The Sacred 
Heart Cadets is a Catholic temperance 
organization. I believe they are total 
abstainers. They formed a part of the 
line and stood at a salute while Temple- 
Noyes Lodge, accompanied by the escort 
of Masons from the Grand Lodge, 
marched through the line." — TJie Key- 
stone-Tyler, January, 191 5. 



MURDER "ALL RIGHT," SAY I. W. W. 

A'incent St. John, of the Industrial Workers 
of the World, is quoted in the Washington 
Post, May 22, 1914, as saying: 

'The point with us is to gain our end. It 
does not matter to us how we gain that end. 
If violence against human life is necessary, 
all right; the end justities the means. If it 
means the ruin of property, all right; again 
the end justifies the means. If it means the 
isolation of a factory, the ruining of raw or 
finished material inside the factory or outside, 
all right; again it is a case of the end justi- 
fying the means. Do we believe in agreements 
between the members of the locals of the I. W. 
W. and the owners of industries? No, we are 
against working agreements of any kind, for 
any length of time. That is where we differ 
from the trade unions. We are a step 
farther. It is our belief that the workman 
loses by making a contract as a member with 
the owner of a mill, factory, or other plant." 
I. W. W. Violence. 

The press dispatches of November 5 told 
of six men killed and fifty wounded in a battle 
between the Industrial Workers of the World 
and the' authorities at Everett, Washington. 

On November 26, a Los Angeles dispatch 
told of the wrecking of the city jail at New- 
hall, near Los Angeles, California, by twenty- 
two Industrial Workers of the World. Some 
of the men involved, as stated in a later report, 
admitted that they were connected with the 
rioting at Everett, Washington. 

Another dispatch from Los Angeles, dated 
Decemxber 15, tells of a conflict between a 
posse of armed deputy sheriffs and thirty-one 
I. W. W. men. 

The San Francisco Chronicle of December 
14 records turmoil at Exeter, occasioned by 
Industrial Workers who "for some days en- 
deavored to foment trouble among employees 
of the orange-packing houses." 

From Porterville, California, comes word 
dated Decem.ber 17, telling of two towns that 
were terrorized by "bands of Industrial Work- 
ers." 

We are not familiar with all the tenets of 
the I. W. W. But we know this— that they 
claim to have great grievances ; and in many 
parts of the world they are stirring up trouble 
because of these grievances. But whatever 
may be the right or the wrong of these con- 
tentions, we know that disturbances have come 
in rapid succession, in a very small section 
of the world, and that they are only illustrative 
of similar conditions which prevail almost 
evervwhere. 

When Christ was here on earth, He said, 
"As the days of Noe were, so shall also the 
coming of the Son of man be." Matthew 24: 
87. And the One who uttered the foregoing 
words inspired Moses, the great leader of 
Israel, to give a graphic account of the condi- 
tions that prevailed in the days of Noah. Of 
that time it is said, "The earth also was cor- 
rupt before God,_ and the earth was filled with 
violence." Genesis 6:11. 

It requires no imagination— merely recog- 
nition of actual facts— to see that the condl- 



May, 1917. 



HRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



15 



tions of to-day are strongly fulfilling the pre- 
dictions of the Master. — Signs of the Times. 
Chicago Labor Repudiates I. W. W. 

Organized labor in Chicago dealt the T. W. 
W. and its methods a solar plexus wallop. 

By a vote that was practically unanimous, 
the Chicago Federation of Labor refused to 
issue credentials to I. W. W. members who 
had planned to seek contributions from vari- 
ous labor unions for the purpose of financing 
the defense of seventy-three members of the 
organization who are to be placed on trial 
for murder at Everett, Wash., as the result 
of recent strike disturbances there. 

Action on the matter was taken by the fed- 
eration after an I. W. W. delegate arose in 
the meeting and made a "brotherly love" ap- 
peal. 

John Fitzpatrick, president of the federation, 
thought differently about the matter. 

"The I. W. W. is an organization which has 
been built up in an endeavor to destroy the 
American Federation of Labor," he said. 
"Time and again, despite the fact that it 
makes its appeals in the name of unionism, 
it has employed tactics calculated to sow the 
seeds of disruption within the ranks of the 
national labor organization." 

A typical example of this was the Everett 
affair. — Chicago Tribune, March 5, 1917. 



TEACHERS' FEDERATION LOSES. 



Illinois Supreme Court Upholds School 
Boards' Control of Teachers, 

The Chicago Teachers' Federation re- 
ceived a body blow from the state Su- 
preme court yesterday in the decision 
upholding the school board's authority 
to employ teachers and to refuse to re- 
employ those it deems unfit. 

The decision was upon the Loeb rule 
under which sixty-eight teachers were 
dropped from the rolls last June — a ma- 
jority of them being members of the 
Teachers' Federation, whose activities, 
under the leadership of Margaret Haley, 
were deemed by the board to be insubor- 
dinate. 

There are said to be 3,600 members of 
the federation in the grade schools and 
400 more are high school teachers who 
are in affiliated organizations. It is said 
that only about 1,000 of the teachers are 
active. 

Miss Haley said that the case would 
be appealed to the United States Su- 
preme court. 

There is said to be no intention to at- 
tempt any wholesale ousting of teachers. 
President Loeb's position has been that 
the dropping of the leaders last summer 



was for the purpose of checking laljor 
union control of the schools. 

The new school law, which has passed 
both houses at Springfield, provides for 
a teniire of office for teachers. No 
teacher may be dropped from the lists 
without a trial. In the present case, 
when the rule is put into operation, 
every teacher affected, who did not wish 
to resign from the federation, could de- 
mand a trial. She would then be tried 
on the charge of violating a rule of the 
board. 

President Loeb was jubilant over the 
court's decision. 

''This is the happiest day of my life," 
he said. "Such a decision is worth mak- 
ing a long fight for. It means that our 
public schools cannot be dominated by 
any outside influences and that the board 
of education shall conduct the affairs of 
the system. There will be no labor 
unions in the public schools." — Chicago 
Tribune, April 20, 19 17. 



NEW LABOR PARTY IN BRITAIN. 

London, March 20. — What is considered the 
ground work for a new political party in 
Great Britain, a party which shall bear the 
name of Imperialist Labor Party, was per- 
fected to-day with the constitutional organiza- 
tion of the British Workers' National League. 

The league is a development of the So- 
cialist defense committee organized in April. 
1915, for the purpose of counteracting peace 
at any price pacifists and antinational ele- 
ments of labor and Socialfst parties, which 
were charged with agitating "pernicious and 
perilous cosmopolitanism." 

What Party Stands For. 

The Hon. John Hodge, minister of labor, 
was elected president by the delegates, who 
took action by resolutions along the following 
lines : 

First, because of their belief in tlie right- 
eousness of the allies' cause they pledge sup- 
port to the government to prosecute the war 
to a A-ictorious termination. 

Second, they will work for the mainte- 
nance of a standard living wage to be fixed 
l)y joint boards of einployers and these agree- 
ments are to be enforced by legislation apply- 
ing in the industries. 

Third, they recorded the conviction that 
war has taught the necessity of state action 
on the subject of national agriculture, but 
for present support a minimum wage for 
agricultural workers with a guarantee against 
rent raising. 

I'^ourth, they urge that all class dissensions 
be dropped for the effective reconstruction of 
national industries and the solution of com- 
plex economic problems after the war. 



16 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



Urge Public Ownership. 

Fifth, they support a project for the exploi- 
tation of natural resources under public own- 
ersliip directed by boards of experts chosen 
from administrative and manual workers. 

Sixth, they indorse restrictions of importa- 
tions of manufactured goods produced at 
lower wages or under inferior labor condi- 
tions than in England. 

Seventh, they support an eight hour day and 
a minimum wage for women workers. 

Eighth, they point out the impossibility of 
women simultaneously being bread winners 
and mothers, and urge an increase of mater- 
nity endowments on the basis that child bear- 
ing is work for the state for which the state 
should pay. 

Ninth, they call on the government to take 
the earliest steps possible for nationalization 
of railways, so as to be run for the benefit of 
the country instead of in the interests of pri- 
vate owners. — Chicago Tribune, March 30, 
1917. 



GOMPERS WOULD CURB SUPREME 
COURT. 

Washington, D. C, March 21. — Presi- 
dent Gompers and Secretary Morrison 
of the American Federation of Labor 
presented to Attorney General Gregory 
to-day a protest against the declaration 
of the Supreme court, in the Adamson 
law decision, that the right of railroad 
employes to strike is limited by the pub- 
lic interest. 

The labor leaders declared the court 
had gone out of its way to inject this 
''reactionary" assertion into its opinion. 
The protest concludes : 

"The opinion of the United States Su- 
preme court in connection with the 
Adamson decision belongs to the reac- 
tionary despotism of Russia and Mexico 
and it is out of harmony with the free 
institutions of this republic." 

Calls Curb on Unions "Industrial Slavery." 
Washington, D. C., March 22. — A call 
to the laboring classes to rise up and 
curb the power of the United States Su- 
preme court is issued in the April num- 
ber of the American Federationist, the 
official organ of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, by Samuel Gompers. 

In an editorial denouncing the decision 
on the Adamson eight-hour law, Mr. 
Gompers asserts the tribunal interpo- 
lated an unsolicited opinion on the ques- 
tion of compulsory arbitration. 

''Five men out of our one hundred 
million," he says, "have interpolated into 



our political institutions a principle de- 
structive of the fundamentals of free- 
dom. The Supreme court has provided 
the way for the establishment of indus- 
trial slavery. 

"Would it not be well for the nation to 
consider the necessity of curbing the as- 
sumption of power by the Supreme court 
rather than to supinely permit the court 
to curb the freedom of the masses — the 
workers ?" — Chicago Tribune. 
Whose Tyranny? 

Mr. Gompers is raging because Chief 
Justice White declared that "the right to 
strike is necessarily surrendered wiien 
men are engaged in public service." 

From a soap box orator this sort of 
thing would not be surprising, but from 
the lips of a supposedly responsible 
leader of organized labor it deserves 
comment. We can not believe this state- 
ment is sincere unless Mr. Gompers' 
brains have become hopelessly addled. 
He objects to the declaration by "five 
men," who happen to be the justices of 
the Supreme court who upheld the 
Adamson law, that four men, who are 
the heads of the railroad brotherhoods, 
should not have the power to paralyze 
the transportation system of the nation. 

Mr. Gompers is talking twaddle when 
he pretends that the principle of public 
service and public safety declared by 
Chief Justice White is "destructive of 
the fundamentals of freedom." He asks 
us to assume that "the masses, the work- 
ers," will be benefited by a general rail- 
way strike to enforce higher pay for a 
small minority of the workers. Gompers 
knows that the masses, the workers, 
must pay for the exercise of this power, 
as well as the classes, and that it is as 
much of a necessity for the wage earner, 
the clerk, and the farmer to shackle as 
to any one whom he represents. 

It is only demagogy to pretend that 
the uncontrolled power of a comparative- 
ly small minority of workers to paralyze 
the whole economic processes of the na- 
tion's life is a "right," which "the 
masses" ought to protect. As a matter 
of cold fact, it is a danger to every 
worker and to every class, a threat of 
the tyranny of force against all the peo- 
ple. 

The right to strike in private industry 



May, 1917. 



CHR[STIAN CYNOSURE 



17 



is fully recognized. But it is obvious to 
any sane mind that in the case of a pub- 
lic service essential to the well being, 
even the life, of the whole community 
this right must give way to a right which 
is paramount to all other rights — the 
community's right of self-preservation. 



The most radical democratic organiza- 
tion would never permit a minority to 
destroy the common prosperity and im- 
peril the common safety. If it did that 
democracy would quickly disappear. — 
Editorial, Chicai^o Tribune, March 26. 
1917. 



A •MOVIE" OF THE UNIONS. 

Clipped from the Daily Press. 



Must Wear Eight Union Labels to Act as 
Delegate. 

Chicago, April 2. — Every delegate to tlie 
Chicago Federation of Labor must be able 
to show, if the demand is made to him, at 
least eight union labels on as many articles 
of clothing worn by him, according to a reso- 
lution passed by the federation yesterday. 
Failure to do so means that he cannot act 
as a delegate until he complies. Women 
members were not mentioned in the resolu- 
tion. 

Janitor Strike at End. 

Chicago, April 4.— Janitors, janitresses, and 
window-washers employed in loop office build- 
ings returned to work yesterday after a two 
months' strike, winning a partial increase of 
wages they demanded. 

"Janitors were getting $55 a month and 
wanted $70," said Walter Zukowski, secretary 
of the union. "We agreed to a compromise 
of a 10 per cent increase for all workers in 
the union. The new scale goes into effect 
May L" 

More than 2,500 persons are members of the 
union, Zukowski said. He also said that jani- 
tors employed in the Conwa\', Merchants' 
Loan and Trust, and Woman's Temple build- 
ing may be called out again in a few weeks. 
Attempt to Dynamite Barber Shop. 

Chicago, ^Nlarch 28. — Four sticks of dyna- 
mite in a bomb with a twelve foot fuse were 
found in front of the Imperial barber shop at 
735-41 West Madison street last night after 
a policeman had frightened away the bomb 
throwers. 

It is supposed the bomb was left 1)y those 
sympathizing with striking barbers, the man- 
ager of the shop having announced his policy 
of remaining open for business as late as the 
downtown shops. 

Rioting Marks Milk Strike. 

Stoughton, Wis., April 1. — Rioting to-day 
marked the sudden inauguration of a strike 
by the farmers in the Chicago Milk Producers' 
Association. RiHe shots were fired at some 
emplo>cs of the milk nurchasing organization. 
Several were beaten, but no one seriously in- 
jured. Arrests are to be made, it is expected, 
and steps taken to prevent a repetition of 
to-day's rioting. 

The rioters were successful in preventing 
shinments, for instead of the usual 35,000 or 
40,000 pounds of milk only 600 pounds were^ 
taken through the picket line to the creamery 



Bullets Fly in Union Office. 

Chicago, April 13.— Two men walked into 
the offices of the International Theatrical Em- 
ployes' Union, on the sixth floor of the Tem- 
ple Court building at 219 South Dearborn 
street, yesterday and talked with President 
Joseph Armstrong and Secretary Edward Col- 
lier. Then bullets began to fly. 

Armstrong was shot in the leg and Collier 
in the right wrist and left arm. One bullet 
struck the Great Northern hotel and others 
broke glass doors and partitions in the offices. 
The victims had their wounds dressed and 
when questioned by detectives told the same 
story that the police have heard from partici- 
pants in other labor rows. 

They denied they knew their assailants or 
the motive for the shootings, but said they 
"preferred to take care of the matter'' them- 
selves. The police are convinced the shooting 
was the result of trouble between rival unions. 
The shooters escaped. 
Anti-Injunction Bill Favorably Reported. 

Springfield, 111., April 11. — Organized labor 
to-day won its first distinct victory of the leg- 
islative session when it secured a favorable 
report of the antiinj unction bill from the sen- 
ate judiciary committee by a. vote of 12 to 4. 
The bill was bitterly opposed by the employ- 
ers. It provides that no restraining order 
shall be granted in labor disputes except to 
prevent irreparable injury to property and 
that persons shall not be prohibited from 
striking or boycotting by injunction. 

Calls Court Strikebreaking Agency. 

Chicago, April IG.— Judge James A. Baldwin 
of the Circuit Court was charged by labor 
leaders with being a part}' to an oroganized 
conspiracy, "with detective agencies, sluggers, 
and employers and their attorneys," to break 
the strike of wome'n's garment workers. His 
court was termed "a strike breaking agency." 
The charges were made by John Fitzpatrick. 
l)resident of the Chicago Federation of Labor, 
and Sol Seidman. 

Electrical Union Head Sentenced. 

Chicago. March 30. — Michael J. ('■Umbrella 
Mike") Royle, formerlv business agent and 
king pin in the Electrical Workers' Union was 
sentenced yesterday to a year in prison and 
fined $5,000 for his part in the conspiracy of 
labor agents and electrical switchboard manu- 
facturers to prevent the use here of switch- 
jli^boards made outside Chicago. Boyle's sen- 
tence was the maximum. Boyle's co-defend- 
ants were sentenced as follows : 



18 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



Raymond Cleary, Boyle's right hand man, 
sixty days in the bridewell and $500 fine; 
Frank A. Lundmark, former business agent 
for Local 713, E. W. U., $500 fine ; \\'arren E. 
Ripple of the J. Lang Electric Company, $3,000 
fine ; John Cuthbert. Cuthbert Electrical and 
Manufacturing Company, $1,000 fine; Charles 
Kreider. Kohler Bros.. $1,000; Otis B. Duncan, 
J. Lang Electric Company, $1,000; James 
Obermiller, States Electric Compan}', $1,500 ; 
Julian J. Nielson, States Electric Compan}^, 
$•500: G. ^^^ Berthold, Electric Apparatus 
Company, $500 ; C. J. Peterson, Henry New- 
gard & Co, $500. 

The corporations, also found guilty, \yere 
fined as foHo\ys : Henry Ne\ygard & Co., 
$•2,000; J. Lang Electric Company, $1,000; 
Cuthbert Electrical and Manufacturing Com- 
pany, $1,000 ; Electric Apparatus Company, 
$500, and the States Electric Company, $500. 
Bomb Explosion. 

Chicago, April 19th. — The explosion of a 
bomb in the rear basement of the new Fuchs 
Theater, 3810 Broad\yay, last night, an hour 
before a mass meeting of striking waiters 
from the Bismarck Garden was to be held in 
the building, led many to believe the garden 
had been dynamited. 

Albert Fuchs, owner of the building, which 
is across the street from the Bismarck Gar- 
den, said the explosion probably was caused 
as a result of a fight between electrical unions 
with whom he has had trouble. 

The bomb aroused the neighborhood, but 
little damage was done. 

The strikers say waiters receive only $1 a 
day and that they are striking for $10 a week, 
with one day off in seven, pay for extra hours, 
and for the right to organize. 

Garbage Team "Strike" Called. 

Exactly one week before the aldermanic 
election 800 team owners on the city pay roll 
demanded an increase in pay that means $250,- 
000 a year. They asked for $7 a day instead 
of the $6 now paid them. The teams are 
used in hauling garbage and ashes. 

Twenty-four aldermen are candidates for 
re-election and many of them will hesitate to 
vote against the team owners. But unless 
something is done to settle the "strike" at 
once, garbage will be piling up in the alleys to 
a dangerous extent. Chairman Richert of 
the finance committee says the extra $250,000 
may have to be taken out of the ward appro- 
priations for street and alley cleaning, as no 
other fund's are available for the purpose. 

The team owners say they now pay their 
drivers only $16 a week. The union scale for 
other teamsters is higher than that. For 
example, the coal teamsters recently estab- 
lished a scale of $3.50 for a ten-hour day. The 
garbage teamsters work eight hours. 
Municipal Construction Strike. 
Chicago, April 3. — Strikes against all mu- 
nicipal construction and repair work, except 
that on school buildings, were ordered yes- 
terday by the building trades council. 

:\fter a noon meeting thirty-one business 
agents began the work of calling out the men 
and it will be continued to-day. Municipal 
officials sa.v about 1,600 city employes belong 



to the unions in the council, and the labor 
spokesmen say several thousand men, includ- 
ing both city and contractors' employes, are 
involved. 

William Gunther of the trades council gave 
the following as some of the reasons for the 
strike : 

Placing of a number of "sixty day" labor- 
ers in jobs after 100 laborers certified under 
civil service w^ere laid off. 

Failure of the cit}- to pay steamfitters the 
union scale of $6 a day. 

Retention of 200 high salaried engineers by 
the city "who do the work of mechanics 
laid offV" 

LTse of bridewell labor in clearing vacant 
lots preparatory to construction work. 
Moving Picture Labor Shooting. 

Chicago, April 9. — Frank Brown, business 
agent for Local 110 of the Moving Picture 
Operators' Union, and Morris Cohn, an exam- 
iner for the citv electrical department, went 
to the White Eagle Theater, 1618 West Eight- 
eenth street, in an automobile after it was re- 
ported to them that gangsters employed by a 
rival union had tampered with electric wires 
there. 

On their arrival, according to one version, 
the gangsters drew revolvers and started fir- 
ing at them. Brown and Cohn returned the 
fire and one of the dozens of bullets ex- 
changed struck Miss Martha Woda, a block 
away. Brown, Cohn, and Rooney who was 
found limping from the scene, were arrested 
and taken to the Hinman street police station. 

There, according to the police, a fresh 
wound was found on Rooney's leg, believed to 
have been made by a bullet. Rooney, it is 
said, admitted having been on the scene, 
but denied taking part in the shooting. 

Rooney last February was acquitted by a 
jury in Judge Barrett's court of the charge 
of having murdered James Cooney in a labor 
dispute in" Hodcarriers' hall. Several days 
ago charges were made that the jury had been 
tampered with. 
Unions Pledge Loyalty During the War. 

Washington, D. C, April 8. — Full and loyal 
support to the government in war against 
Germany has been pledged by organized labor 
of America. 

The council of national defense announced 
this tonight in a statement giving details of a 
conference held yesterday with its advisory 
commission, Samuel Gompers, president of 
the American Federation of Labor, and heads 
of various other labor and employers' or- 
ganizations. 

No strikes or labor disputes of any kind 
during the war is the program. 
Chicago Federation Refuses to Declare 
Loyalty. 
Chicago, April 18.— -The Chicago Federation 
of Labor seems to be dominated by men who 
do not consider themselves a part of the 
United States. 

At the meeting on Sunday, which refused 
to take action, one proposal was to lay an 
embargo on all foodstuffs and necessaries of 
life; another was to put all effort into obtain- 
ing the conscription of incomes. 



May, 1917, 



CHRISTTAX CYNOSURE 



19 



The first proposal would be warmly sec- 
onded in German}-, but if congress were in- 
sane enough to adopt it American labor would 
suffer worse than any other class by the 
industrial disorganization which would follow. 

Union and Nonunion Labor Mobilizing. 

Philadelphia, Pa., March 20. — Officers of 
the international unions in this city said to- 
day that the barriers between union and non- 
union labor have been taken down in an effort 
to mobilize the skilled artisans for work at the 
navy yards and federal arsenals. 
Asks Gompers to End Can Factorj^ Strike. 

Washington, D. C, April 17. — Secretary 



Redfield to-daj- appealed to Samuel Gompers 
to use his good offices in ending a strike of 
workmen- at the plant of the Wheeling Steel 
and Iron Company at Wheeling, \Y. V3.., 
which is preventing the output of 2,000,000 tin 
cans a day. Mr. Redfield pointed out the 
unusual needs for canned goods the country 
will face soon. Attention also was directed 
to Mr. Gompers' recent declaration that there 
would be no strikes during the war. The 
strike, which has been in progress four days, 
has already resulted in the curtailment of the 
supply of cans sufficient, Mr. Redfield esti- 
mates, to contain 24,000,000 meals. 



3(nl|n(!^mttrg A&ama — #txthPr?at&pntHmtf& BUUb 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of ]Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William ^^lorgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic standpoint.] 

Ouincy, 19 August, 1832. 
\\'illiam L. Stone, Esq. 

Dear Sir: On receiving at Washington 
the volume of "Letters Upon IMasonrv 
and Antimasonry," which you did me 
the honor of addressing to me, I wrote 
you a few lines of acknowledgment with 
the assurance of my intention to read 
with deep attention the work to the com- 
position and publication of which I felt 
great satisfaction in believing that I had 
contributed to give occasion. I have ac- 
cordingly perused it with the most earn- 
est solicitude, and the result has been 
not only a confirmed conviction that the 
institution of Freemasonr}' ought in these 
United States to be totally and forevei 
abolished, but that this event is a con- 
summation devoutly to be wished. 

In the three letters which I wrote about 
a year since to a friend in Philadelphia. 
and which were submitted to your peru- 
sal, I presented in the form of interroga- 
tion a list of nine atrocious crimes under 
the denomination of Morgan — Murder 
Crimes, with the inquiry whether they 
had not been so committed as in a great 
degree to have lost the character of in- 
dividual guilt in their perpetrators and 
to have assumed that of associate or cor- 
porate offenses : as conspiracies, in which 
numerous bodies of men constituting 
lodges, chapters and encampments of 
Freemasons were implicated ; and inquir- 
ing further, whether the commission of 



those crimes had not been previously 
instigated by the oaths administered, the 
obligations imposed, and the penalties 
imprecated or denounced, in the ordinary 
forms of the admission of candidates to 
the numerously graduated hierarchy of 
Freemasonry. 

That these crimes had been commit- 
ted, that the efficient impulse to the com- 
mission of them had been the ^lasonic 
oaths, obligations and penalties, and that 
they were incorporate crimes conceived 
and matured for action in the ^lasonic 
deliberative bodies in the western part 
of the state of New York I firmly be- 
lieve from a mass of irresistible evidence, 
which had been growing into certainty 
for a series of years. On the other hand, 
many of the most important facts, both 
in relation to the commission of the 
crimes and to the purport of the ^Masonic 
oaths and obligations had been vehement- 
ly contested. A considerable number of 
seceders from ^lasonry had revealed all 
the secrets of all the degrees and all the 
oaths and obligations and penalties, as 
established in the lodges, chapters and 
encampments in all the region round 
where the murder had been perpetrated. 
The books of David Bernard and Avery 
Allyn, both seceding Knights Templars, 
had been published. Bernard had been 
admitted to the ineffable degrees in New 
York, Allyn at Xew Haven in Connecti- 
cut. The Rev. ^Nloses Thatcher and Pliny 
Merrick had declared that the Royal 
Arch oath was in many lodges in Rhode 
Island and ^Massachusetts administered 
with the words, "murder and treason not 
excepted." That it was so administered 
in the state of Xew York had been testi- 
mony extorted and most reluctantly given 



20 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



upon oath by Royal Arch Masons upon 
trials before courts of justice — and yet 
adhering Masons were solemnly declar- 
ing that they had taken no such oaths, 
that they acknowledge no obligation in- 
compatible with the laws of God or of 
the land, that the only penalty ever in- 
flicted was expulsion, and that they did 
not believe the oaths and obligations were 
otherwise understood by IMasons every- 
where. 

In the controversial conditions of the 
facts upon the issue which seemed to 
have been made up between the adhering 
and the seceding Masons, I had preferred 
stating them to our friend at Philadel- 
phia in the form of interrogation rather 
than to assume them as granted. He 
was a Mason, inclining to Antimasonry, 
but unwilling to join its political stand- 
ard. He knew little of what had taken 
place in the western counties of the state 
of Xew York and had been made to dis- 
believe the most prominent facts of the 
tale of horror connected with the fate of 
Morgan. I was desirous, if possible, to 
keep myself entirely disentangled from 
all the politics of Antimasonry, but this 
was becoming exceedingly difficult. I 
wished for a more perfect exposition of 
facts from a source fully informed — 
from a person in whose candor arid in- 
tegrity I could place entire reliance, and 
not so connected with either of the par- 
ties as to be under a bias disqualifying 
to the perception or to the judiciary fac- 
ulty. I was well assured that I should 
find this in your book and I have not 
been disappointed. The book is marked 
with integrity and candor which not 
even the fifth libation has been able to 
prevent. ■ " " 

(To be continued.) 



MOODY INSTITUTE SUMMER 
COURSE. 

A special summer course in evangelistic 
singing and playing is announced by The 
Moody Institute of Chicago for the six weeks 
extending from June 27 to August 8. 

The Institute has a strong musical depart- 
ment under the supervision of Dr. D. B. 
Towner, the well known hymn writer. All 
who realize the importance of the gospel in 
song as well as in sermon will find the course 
of special value. It is intended for pas- 
tors, evangelists, theological students, mission- 
aries on furlough, Sunday school and day 
school teachers and other Christian workers 
who wish to spend part of their vacation this 



summer in hetter preparation for Christian 
work. Students in this course may attend any 
of the other classes of the Institute without 
additional cost. A bulletin outlining the 
course and giving full information has been 
prepared and will be sent upon application to 
the Institute, 153 Institute place, Chicago. 



EitomL 



Read on another page the call of the 
National Christian Association to its An- 
nual Meeting in the First Reformed 
church, Chicago, corner Michigan ave- 
nue and One Hundred and Seventh 
street. 



THE "STATE OF WAR." 

The "State of War" into which our 
country has been drawn brings a heavy 
responsibility upon every citizen. New 
conditions and new responsibilities re- 
quire new adjustments. Demands of 
time and money in public or patriotic 
service will be made on us all. The 
tendency will be to allow our minds to 
be distracted from the needs of the N. 
C. A., benevolence. Missions, and the 
various forms of Christian work, be- 
cause of the absorbing character of the 
stupendous task to which our nation has 
set itself. 

Let us not, however, forget that when 
Jesus said, "Seek ye first the kingdom 
of God, and his righteousness ; and all 
these things shall be added unto you," 
he did not limit it to times of peace. 
Christian work will suffer just in pro- 
portion as Christian people allow them- 
selves to become absorbed by our mate- 
rial needs. History shows that the 
tendency of war is not to increase the 
spiritual fervor of people but rather to 
deaden it. This will not be true in all 
places nor of all Christian people, but, 
of the country as a whole, it will be true. 

Antisecrecy has never been a popular 
form of Christian work. What will be 
true of the general laxity in religious 
conditions will be even more so in our 
Cause unless Christian people determine 
to support the work more vigorously 
than heretofore. 

It was when men's minds were dis- 
tracted by the conflict and subsequent 
distress in the early sixties that Masonry 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



21 



revived. Men had supposed that the 
great popular outpouring of righteous in- 
dignation, following the murder of Will- 
iam Morgan and the subsequent revela- 
tion of Masonry's throttle hold upon the 
courts so that the murderers were never 
brought to justice, had forever branded 
the institution as a public menace. But 
under the shadow of the war cloud 
Masonry silently spread like a plague. 
When the war was over, the nation was 
astonished to find that the accursed 
thing was twice as strong as it had ever 
been. 

Times such as we face call for greater, 
rather than slackened, effort. Let us 
consecrate ourselves to keep the Anti- 
secrecy banner floating. The officers and 
directors can not do this alone. They 
will do their part but the responsibility 
rests upon you. We must share in your 
daily prayers and in your financial sup- 
port as far as you are able. 

"Bring ye all the tithes into the store- 
house, that there may be meat in mine 
house, and prove me now herewith, saith 
the Lord of hosts, if I will not open you 
the window\s of heaven, and pour you 
out a blessing, that there shall not be 
room enough to receive it." 



The real secrets of Freemasonry are 
as much of a mystery to a majority of 
the Masons as to the uninitiated, simply 
because they do not study and delve for 
them in the "rubbish of the temple." — 
Texas Freemason. 

"Rubbish" is right ! 



NARROWNESS OF FREEMASONRY. 

Nothing marks the Masonic order 
more plainly than its slender scope and 
narrow bound. It lacks room for prac- 
tical life, no less than for reasonable 
theor}^ Reticent in telling the little that 
it is, yet ever bold in pretending to be 
much that it is not, it remains silent 
when it ought to speak if it had anything 
true to say. Deficiency is its distin- 
guishing feature ; its peculiar mark, vac- 
uity. Most of its very secrecy is empty 
silence. 

Narrow scope is strikingly manifest at 
the point where it vaunts alleged moral- 
ity. Tested by the true Christian stand- 
ard, Masonry is not moral. In certain 



features it is worse than deficient, being 
not merely unmoral but overtly immoral. 
Nowhere does it fill out the full scope 
or occupy the entire range of the gen- 
uine ethical principles of Christian 
morals. 

As a religious cult it is anticjuated, ■ 
withered, and pitiful. Claiming every- 
thing, it possesses nothing. Now mak- 
ing a show of the Bible, and again di- 
rectly repudiating or indirectly supplant- 
ing it, ^lasonry knows no authorized 
revelation, no standard of religious 
belief. 

Besides all this, it is empty of what 
interests the mind, stimulates thought, 
or develops intellectual power. Slight 
mental capacity is needed to compass so 
narrow^ requirements. Breadth is not a 
feature of Freemasonry. Neither food 
for thought, a path for moral progress, 
nor a home for the soul finds room in 



In Louisiana it is considered a Ala- 
sonic offense to "cheat, wrong and de- 
fraud," and the victim is not told, when 
he tries to make a brother keep his obli- 
gation, that the "lodge is not a collecting 
agency," as he is told in some jurisdic- 
tions we know of. — Texas Freemason! 

This speaks well for the moral tone of 
the remaining jurisdictions! 



ODD-FELLOW "CHARITY." 

If we had supposed that the Odd-Fel- 
lows were a charitable organization be- 
cause they say they are and because they 
escape paying taxes on their vast prop- 
erties, on the plea of their "charities," 
one could imagine our surprise to find 
that there is a great protest expressed in 
some of their leading journals because, 
in the older lodgea, there are "from one 
to six chronic invalids," the only "in- 
fimiity they are suff'ering from is that 
of old age," who are drawing a paltry 
$1 per week. If there ever was a chance 
for real, spontaneous charity, this would 
seem to be it. But how shallow is this 
claim of charity is shown from the /. O. 
O. F. Lodge Record, April, 19 17, where 
the writer says, "One lodge in particular 
was dragg'ed from prosperity' to the 
verge of bankruptcy" by paying some 
aged members their meager one dollar a 
week. 



22 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



The trouble with this business is that 
it is not charity. The Dominion Inde- 
pendent Odd-Fellozc speaks tJnis of their 
"burden" — the aged members: 

"Yet every lodge, of our older lodges, 
is paying to-day one or more old mem- 
bers who have no specific illness. It is 
so difticult to draw the line. These mem- 
bers are unable to follow any vocation, 
and so they become burdens on their 
lodges because they have reached the 
age beyond which man cannot labor. It 
would be all right if our lodge funds 
had been built up to meet these cases, 
but they have not. 

"A glance at the figures compiled for 
the Dominion government by competent 
actuaries, in working out the plan of 
our Canadian g-ovemment annuities, will 
show that at the age of thirty a man 
must pay a yearly fee of six dollars and 
fifty cents ($6.50) to secure an old age 
pension of fifty dollars ($50) per annum, 
commencing at the age of sixty-five. We 
take in our average member at about the . 
age of thirty; we charge him — in prac- 
tically all the lodges outside the larger 
cities — six ($6.00) dollars per annum. 
For that amount we give him all the 
social advantages of a weekly lodge ses- 
sion, sick benefits of three ($3.00) dol- 
lars per week for a full year, a funeral 
benefit of forty ($40.00) dollars, and a 
widow's benefit of one hundred ($100) 
dollars. 

''As the Government rates clearly 
show, we cannot afford to add to these 
an old age pension. If a member con- 
templates that as one of the advantages 
of membership in an Odd-Fellows' lodge 
it will be necessary to charge him at 
least double the average of the present 
annual dues. 

"Some plan must be devised by the 
Grand Lodge, and made a part of our 
working Constitution, to protect our 
lodge treasuries against the demands for 
these old age annuities, or very many 
lodges will find themselves seriously em- 
barrassed in the immediate future." 

''Charity suffereth long and is kind." 
But not so with the lodge "charity." It 
is neither kind nor inclined to suffer, be- 
cause it is not really charity, but a busi- 
ness propositon. It is about time the 
Odd-Fellows order practiced a little of 



the "Truth" they prate about and called 
its business transactions by the 
name — Insurance. 



right 



As Masonic clubs are now becoming 
an established adjunct of the lodge, why 
should not the sons of Master Masons 
of suitable age be admitted as associate 
members? The environment of such 
clubs could not fail being beneficial to 
the young men. — Texas Freemason. 

We have our doubts about the benefits 
to the young men, but we can see that it 
would furnish an unfailing supply of re- 
cruits for the order. 



A. D. Baughman, an old time Mason, 
who died the latter part of November at 
Charlotte, was a spectator at the Ford 
theater when President Lincoln was as- 
sassinated. — The Tyler Keystone. 

Was that a Masonic event, too? 



CONCOMITANTS. 

As "a man is known by the company 
he keeps," so, likewise, is an institution 
known by its regular concomitants ; for 
which reason we are unable to overlook 
some things that keep close to a lodge.- 
Booze follows a lodge like its shadow. 
Origin and continued history, alike, 
show this associaton of lodge practices 
and drinking. Even a sanctimonious 
Templar Conclave does not refrain from 
drenching itself at once with liquor and 
with sacrilege. 

Dancing is a concomitant, not less of 
adoptive than of real orders. Whether 
condemned or condoned ; however con- 
ducted, and with whatever result; danc- 
ing keeps constant step with lodge rou- 
tine endlessly circling round. 

Cards share with dancing, as both 
with drinking. Gamblers of both sexes 
can find here ample convenience for their 
familiar games, without which the lodge 
would be hardly well furnished. 

Some other things cannot here be 
named, for they are as rigidly excluded 
as these are included. Yet they, like 
those named, are indexes. A man is 
known by the company he does not or 
cannot keep, and an institution may be 
known by things that are not and can- 
not be its concomitants. Although re- 
jected, they seem nowise inferior; while 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



23 



they would not less readily coalesce with 
a "beautiful system of morality," nor fit 
less naturally among things that seem to 
be well "founded on the Bible." 



If an X-ray of our thoughts could be 
taken unbeknown, what an exposure of 
our inner life there would be. — Editor 
Texas Freemason. 

Yes, indeed ! Will not some one vol- 
unteer to operate the X-ray? 



Good taste would dictate modesty in 
the use of Masonic titles, especially in 
public. High sounding titles are apt to 
excite the derision of the profane, who 
are not presumed to understand their 
peculiar meaning. — Tyler-Keystone. 

How fortunate that their "peculiar 
meaning" is not generally understood, 
for were the emptiness and sham gener- 
ally realized, the derision of the "pro- 
fane" would be complete. 



A "SECRET" SOCIETY. 

The Grand Lodge of Connecticut, ac- 
cording to the Masonic Chronicler, 
adopted a report on publicity for Ma- 
sonic lodges, which said: "A secret so- 
ciety is one which seeks to conceal its 
existence and its objects. Freemasonry 
is not such a society and is secret only as 
to the obligations, means of recognition, 
ballots upon candidates and forms or 
ceremonies observed in conferring the 
degrees. With the exception of those 
particulars, Masonry has no reservations 
from the public." 

According to this, Masonry is as open 
as a vSalvation Army street meeting, 
since even its "obligations," "cere- 
monies," etc., long ago ceased to be real 
secrets. But to claim that Freemasonry 
is not a secret society is the limit for 
audacious argument, for the reason that 
the premise is not true. The brains that 
evolved this report must have survived 
from the stone age. 



According to The Independent, A])ril 
1917, Billy Sundav said, "God tells 
America to wipe Mexico off the face of 
the earth." 

This does not sound like the voice of 
God as we read it in our Bible. It has 
none of the compelling power and dig- 
nity of the Biblical, "thus saith the 



Lord." Mr. Sunday's utterance is a 
piece of shocking irreverence that calls 
for unqualified rebuke. What confi- 
dence are we to place in the message of 
this man who, claiming to be the mouth- 
])iece of God, fiippantly delivers such an 
unchristian message ? 



BISHOP MILTON WRIGHT. 

IMilton Wright was born November 
17, 1828, and died at the home of his 
son Orville, in Oakwood, Dayton, 
April 3, 1917. 



Ohio, 




BISHOP JMILTON WRIGHT, IN ACTIVE LIFE. 

His childhood and early manhood 
were spent on the farm. He attended 
the country schools of the neighborhood, 
and later was for a time a student at 
Hartsville College. However, the larger 
part of his education was obtained by 
extensive reading, he being a profound 
student. 

In 1859 he was married to Susan 
Catherine Koerner, who was to him a 
loving and efficient helpmate for nearly 
thirty years. He is survived b>' three 
sons, Reuchlin. Lorin and Or\ille. and 
one daughter, Katharine Another son, 
Wilbur, died in 1912. Two of these" 
sons, Wilbur and Orville, attained world- 
wide fame in the field of invention. 

The contribution made to science -and 
the field of invention bv Wilbur and 



24 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



C^rvrlle A\'right can not to-day have any 
adequate evaluation. History will show 
that the invention of the aeroplane was 
equal in importance to invention of the 
steamboat, or the steam engine, or the 
automobile. And. in the acquisition of 
this world fame, which would have 
swept many a man oft' his feet, and in 
the conduct subsequent thereto, we see 
the priceless value of fundamental Chris- 
tian teaching- and conduct in the home. 
To maintain Christian character and 
follow out Christian principles under 
such circumstances reflects the very high- 
est credit upon parents, and no higher 
tribute can be paid to any father. 

After the loss of his wife in 1889, he 
resided with his sons, Wilbur and Or- 
ville, and his daughter Katharine. 

Bishop Wright was converted in 1843, 
and joined the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ. He was ordained 
in August, 1856, and in 1857 was sent 
by the church as a missionary to the ' 
Pacific Coast, going to the coast via the 
Isthmus of Panama. For two years he 
preached and taught in the region about 
Salem, Oregon. After his return to the 
east in 1859, he taught for a short time, 
and then served as pastor and presiding 
elder in White River Conference, his 
last pastorate being at the college church 
at Hartsville, Indiana, where, in connec- 
tion with his pastoral work, he was 
made a professor of theology in the col- 
lege. 

At the General Conference of the 
United Brethren church in 1869 he was 
chosen editor of The Religious Tele- 
scope, which position he held for eight 
vears. In 1877 he was made a Bishop of 
the church, and, with the exception of 
four years, was so continued for the re- 
mainder of his active ministry. 

Bishop Wright all his life was strong- 
Iv opposed to secret organizations, be- 
lieving them to be evil in their nature 
and tendency. When, in 1889, a division 
occurred in the church, largely because 
of this question, he remained with that 
branch which continued faithful to the 
original constitution and faith of the 
church. He was a man of deep convic- 
tions, and he had little sympathy for 
those whom he reg:arded as sacrificing 
principle for expediency. 



The evening before he died he was 
apparently in good health, reading the 
paper and conversing with his children 
until the usual hour of retirement. He 
was found apparently peacefully sleep- 
ing in the morning. It was evident that 
he had passed away during the night 
without struggle or suffering. His body 
was laid away beside that of his wife 
and son ^^'ilbur in beautiful Woodland 
Cemetery. His spirit is with his Heaven- 
ly Father, whom he loved and served so 
long. A great soul has gone to its re- 
ward. 

Bishop Wright was a lifelong friend of 
the National Christian Association, and 
at the time of his death he was the 
oldest corporate member. Bishop Wright 
and Hon. J. A. Conant, Eld. S. C. Kim- 
ball and Pres. C. A. Pilanchard, were the 
only members remaining of those who 
joined in the early days of the Associa- 
tion. 



LOST CIPHER KEYS. 

The officers of various lodges in Mich- 
igan must have felt humiliated and 
thought it a serious offense when they 
w^ere obliged to report to the Grand Sec- 
retary that they had lost their rituals or 
cipher keys to the esoteric work, in one 
way or another, and asked for another 
to replace the ones lost on railway trains 
and in other public places. What a sad 
commentary upon the fair name of the 
institution of Freemasonry. — Masonic 
Tidings. 

Why feel humiliated when they might 
have borrowed $2.50, if they did not 
possess that much, and have sent for 
another copy. 



BOOK NOTICE. 
The Holy Spirit. 

Eld. I. J. Rosenberger of Covington, 
Ohio, has written on the Holy Spirit as 
to his activities in the creation of the 
world, and in man's conversion and as 
man's partner. 

"The Holy Spirit" is the title of this 
book of 176 pages, and is for sale by the 
author at the above address, cloth, $1.00 
postpaid. It ought to find a place in 
many Christian homes. It is easily un- 
derstood and is also illuminating. The 
author turns over all profits from its 
sale to Christian Missions. 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



. 25 



j^ettig of 0UV OTorfe 

AN OLD TIME REVIVAL. 
Sin Rebuked and Sinners Saved. 



[The following extract from a letter re- 
ceived from our friend, A. D. Cline, a dry 
goods merchant of Pikeville, Ky., is a kind to 
rejoice the hearts we trust of every reader of 
the Cynosure.] 

''We have just closed a two weeks' 
meeting at Nigh, Ky., with great results, 
notwithstanding the rain poured down 
and the river and creeks were over their 
banks and there was a great overflow of 
water. Yet the people came for miles 
carrying lanterns, crossing the waters in 
small boats and on horseback. God 
poured out his Spirit upon them until 
there was a great coming together of 
neighbors, friends and enemies, until it 
seemed as though there would not be 
left in that section of the country any 
who had not accepted Christ as their 
personal Saviour, Sanctifier and Keeper, 
or who w^ere not moved to live a better 
Christian life than ever before. The 
whole country was stirred under the 
mighty power of God. Sin was unveiled 
in every form — especially the great lodge 
evil. It was wonderful how God hon- 
ored the preaching of his Word. It pays 
to obey him. 

''God has seen fit to let me pass 
through some great trials for which I 
give him my continued praise. I am 
pushing the battle against the lodge sin 
with all my power. They can hardly get 
enough together in our town to hold a 
meeting and many are coming out of the 
lodge, which has become so rotten in 
itself that it has almost fallen to pieces. 
I preach against it on the streets and in 
the church and wherever I am called to 
bear my testimony. People who w^ere 
changed. Bless God, I love to live his 
once bitterly opposed to me have 
life. Pray for me." 



West Med ford, Mass., March 13, 1917. 
Some time ago I got from you some 
interesting tracts on Masonry, which 
gave the oaths and some of the secret 
work of the institution. I distributed 
the same and thev caused consternation 



among some of the so-called elect. I 
want some more for distribution and I 
would like some tracts on the work of 
the Eastern Star to distribute among 
some of' the sisters who think more of the 
Star than they do of the Christ child 
of Bethlehem. 

I know of no institution in the coun- 
try that is doing so much subtle harm 
to the cause of the kingdom of God as 
are secret societies. 

I w^ant to congratulate the National 
Christian Association on the good work 
that it is doing in distributing this litera- 
ture. I see great need for the extension 
of the work you are doing. There are 
so many ministers who need .to have 
their eyes opened and so many laymen 
needing instruction concerning the pagan 
origin of Masonry that, if I could get or 
cause to be got from $50,000 to $100,- 
000, I would lay it in gratitude at your 
feet for a vigorous campaign from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, that would drive 
the thing to cover. 

I have said repeatedly that when we 
finish the saloon octopus it will be in 
order to clean out the secret society octo- 
pus. I love the brethren but God knows 
I hate the system that got me to swallow 
that damnable blasphemous oath which 
placed me on a level with all the pirates 
and murderers and cutthroats of the 
ages. It will take ages to fumigate my 
soul of its poison as it often took a week 
to fumigate my clothes from the nico- 
tine poison of the anteroom where I 
huno- mv coat and hat. 



Yours fraternalb 



F. A. Leitch. 



A SECEDER'S REASONS. 

■\Iy reasons for renouncing the Lodge 
were these : 

'T left the Masons after having read 
the exposures which showed that Ma- 
sonry was founded on a base fabrication 
from the start. Hiram Abiff, finished all 
the work that he was to do for King 
Solomon and was not slain during the 
building of the Temple. 

"I left the Knights of Pythias from 
the dictation or direction of the Holy 
Spirit. I realized that I was unequally 
yoked with unbelievers, and I did not 
care to be a member of an organization 
that continually gave balls when my 



26 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



church was hg-hting against it all the 
time. 

"The book 'Let There Be Light,' tes- 
timonies of the pastors of the Moody 
church, settled the Lodge matter with 
me forevermore. 

"H. J. McKlNNEY." 

ALarch 2:^, 1917. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

This finds me on my westward trip as 
far as Dayton, Ohio. The program 
given in my last report was carried out 
as planned. Rain prevented many from 
attending the ^lidland Park, New Jer- 
sey, meeting, hut those who braved the 
storm seemed thankful for the message. 
Rev. J. B. Hoekstra is to be congratu- 
lated for his large congregation of loyal, 
faithful workers. 

The audience that greeted me on Sab- 
bath evening in the Prospect Street 
Christian Reformed church, Passaic, 
Xew Jersey, was equal to that of a year 
since, as was also the offering given in 
aid of our work. This is doubtless due 
in large degree to the faithful work be- 
ing done by the pastor, Domine D. 
DeBeer. 

My lecture given in the Hall of St. 
Paul's Lutheran church, Paterson, New 
Jersey, was not as largely attended as 
Pastor Koenig thought it would be, but 
a number of the faithful gathered, and 
we comforted ourselves with the thought 
that Cjuality was more desirable than 
quantity. The pastor assured me that 
they "did most thoroughly enjoy the ad- 
dress." 

Addresses in the Second and Fourth 
Christian Reformed churches were also 
helpful. Weather conditions' lessened 
the attendance in the former meeting. I 
was assured that much good was accom- 
plished and more meetings of a similar 
nature were desired. 

Some days were spent in Washington, 
D. C, and vicinity. The war, of course, 
is the absorbing topic, other matters be- 
ing pushed largely to one side. A visit 
to Alexandria, Virginia, permitted the 
renewal of former acquaintances. There 
were several expressions of appreciation 
for meetings held there last winter in 
the Free Methodist church. In my west- 
ern trip I stopped at Braddock, Pa., New 



Concord, Zanesville, Columbus, Dela- 
ware, Leonardsburg, Cedarville, and 
Xenia, Ohio. Some good was accom- 
plished in each place, and many tracts 
were distributed. Those who have been 
keeping the Cynosure in schools and 
libraries were willing to continue. It is 
hoped much good may come to the young 
people thus receiving our important mes- 
sage. 

The pastor of the Radical United 
Brethren church at Delaware, Ohio, in- 
vited me to remain and preach to his 
people last Sabbath, but it seemed best 
to worship with our Free Methodist 
friends at Columbus. Brother E. D. 
Crane, the pastor, was called away, so 
the services both morning and evening" 
were given into my care. Truths along 
the line of our special work were pre- 
sented in both church and Sabbath 
school, and were welcomed by those 
seeking more knowledge on the lodge 
question. Brother E. D. Spencer, at 
whose home I was kindly entertained, 
is among those recently seceding from 
the Masonic lodge. 

My attention was called to several 
lodges making contributions to patriotic 
efforts. What a pity that such contribu- 
tions could not be made through more 
worthy channels ! As friends will doubt- 
less wish to read little, that they may 
work much, I make this report short. 
God help us to look up, move forward, 
and not grow weary in well doing! We 
have important truth, let us proclaim it ! 



REPORT OF SOUTHERN AGENT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

Since my last letter I have been privi- 
leged to visit and speak at four annual 
church gatherings : the Louisiana Freed- 
men's Baptist Association, the Women's 
First District Baptist Association, the 
First District Baptist Sunday School 
Convention, and the First District Bap- 
tist Association of Churches. Each 
body was largely attended by some of 
the strongest ministers and laymen of 
the negro race. Although secret lodge 
pins, lodge signs and on several occa- 
sions — and especially during my address 
at the Sunday School convention — the 
sign of distress was openly manifested, 
nevertheless, your representative was 
cordially received and extended cour- 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



27 



tesies and given a few minutes to speak 
of our work. 

At the Women's Association I suc- 
ceeded in getting the following resolu- 
tion passed : "We believe our people 
have been and are too keenly concerned 
in the organization of oath-bound secret 
societies and other worldy organizations, 
to the exclusion of religion and other 
necessary and beneficial interests, there- 
fore we advise and urge our people 
everywhere to look well before affiliating 
with oath-bound and other sinful organ- 
izations. Resolved that we heartily en- 
dorse the Anti-Saloon League, the W. C. 
T. U., the Civic League and other pa- 
triotic movements seeking for law en- 
forcement, Sabbath observance, the abo- 
lition of the debauching saloon and other 
places of vice. We hereby pledge our 
prayerful, moral and financial aid to help 
accomplish the desired results." 

I have just closed a week's Evangel- 
fstic services with the Austerlitz Baptist 
church, where several persons made pro- 
fession of faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. 
I attended services March 25 at St. 
Mark's Fourth Baptist Church. The 
Knights of Pythias were holding their 
annual thanksgiving service here. All of 
the speakers represented the organiza- 
tion as a religious institution, founded on 
the Bible, and next to the church. They 
said it is doing a great work to lift up 
humanity and make the world better. 
The speaker on Pythianism, after extol- 
ling Damon and Pythias and declaring 
that they were two of the truest charac- 
ters the world has even seen, declared 
that the order dated back three or four 
hundred years before the coming of 
Christ and finally wound up by telling 
his hearers that the first lodge was 
founded in 1851. This was too deep for 
me ! 

The pastor of the church who 
preached the sermon, introduced him- 
self, after the lodge dignitaries had con- 
sumed fully an hour and a half, by boast- 
fully declaring that he himself was one 
of their number and was fully in accord 
with each preceding speaker and that he 
had found nothing in the order against 
Christian principles and the teaching of 
the Bible. This pastor is an earnest, 
good man, but the crafty lodge has 
blinded his reasoning, and he does not 



understand the Word of God. ITow can 
blind guides and perverters of Bible 
truth lead the people to a higher reli- 
gious plane? "Like priest, like peo- 
ple" is -as true to-day as it ever was. 

I had an appointment on the same 
night to preach at Kennerville, Louisi- 
ana, but the Knights of Pythias sermon 
there took almost all of the congregation. 
Not even the officers of the church came 
to hear the gospel, but the whole town 
flocked to the Methodist church to wit- 
ness the lodge ceremonies. 

There are a great many negroes leav- 
ing this city for points in the North. If 
this continues as it has been in the last 
few weeks, it will cause a labor famine. 
The leading city papers, instead of help- 
ing the negro secure a square deal, are 
abusive and harsh and misrepresent him 
and try to mold bitter sentiment against 
him in his new field in the North. Some 
of the papers here are trying to stir up 
race feelings by publishing glaring and 
inflammatory headlines to the effect that 
the negroes are plotting to join the Ger- 
man forces to overthrow America. Such 
charges are absurd, for history proves 
that the negroes are the most loyal de- 
fenders of our flag from the battle of 
Bunker Hill to the slaughter at Carizal, 
Mexico, in 19 16. When all men accept 
the Fatherhood of God and the brother- 
hood of man in Christ, then, and not 
until then, will wars cease, and swords 
be beaten into plow shares. 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Argenta, Arkansas, April 11, 1917. 
Dear Cynosure: 

I have been in a great revival lasting 
nearly thirty days in Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas. I taught many lessons on the sin of 
secret societies in the meeting. 

One brother told me that he was a 
32nd degree Mason, and a little over a 
year ago he heard a young preacher, 
who had learned about secret societies 
through the tracts of the N. C. A., show 
the great sin of the lodges and make it 
plain from the Bible. He said : 'T was 
made to see how awful it was to sin like 
we Masons have to do in the oaths we 
take. I knew it was true that we do 
protect all kinds of secret deviltry. I 
prayed to God to help me to give up the 
Masonic lodge. It is a hard thing to do, 



28 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



for in some way tliere is a charm that 
holds a maji captive. But I got loose, by 
the help of God. I had a square and 
compass charm on my watch chain and 
the Lord troubled me until I took it off. 
Xow I am free from not only the lodge 
sin, but from all sin."' 

I said to the church, "There is no way 
to escape the great judgment that is 
come on us. \\'e need not g'o north, or 
east, or west, but go and pray as we are 
told to in Luke 21 -.^G. Do not you see 
men's hearts are failing? (verses 25, 26 
and 34). You may go to the secret 
chambers but He is not there. "If any 
man shall say unto you, Lo here is 
Christ, or there; believe it not" (Matt. 
24:23, 26). Y^ou need not go North for 
nothing will exalt a nation but righteous- 
ness (Proverbs 14:34). You' will not 
serve God. Every man seems to be 
joined to his idols. We see that peace is 
taken from the earth, and neither the 
Masonic god nor any other idol god can 
help us. The nations are angry and the 
time for judgment is come (Rev. 11 :i8). 
The safest thing for us is to be in a state 
of prayer. The Word of the Lord is a 
strong tower and the righteous run in 
and are saved. 

I had a great meeting at Dumas, Ar- 
kansas. I was there four days and did 
not forget to expose the secret work of 
the Devil. It seems as if the "indigna^ 
tion of the Lord is upon 'the nations'' 
(Isa. 34:1-4). God bless the N. C. A. 
If God is for us, wdio can be against us? 
I am praying for all who are in 
authority. 

Y^ours for Him who said: "I am the 
door." 

Lizzie Roberson. 



FROM ELD. G. B. CROCKETT. 

Dear Cynosure: 

Again I am permitted to write to you. 
I have been silent for some time, but 
busy. I was in Memphis in December, 
and on my way home I stopped at Craw- 
fordsville, which is the place where they 
wanted to kill me for preaching God's 
Word against secret orders. This tim.e 
I learned that one of our brethren, A. C. 
Murry, had spoken against the lodge 
and the people rose up against him 
and compelled him to leave. Another 
brother, 5lr. M. Saunders, testified to the 



truth, and they shot at him one night. I 
stopped with one of our sisters, whose 
husband is a strong advocate of the 
lodge. While there a Mr. Turner, a 
farmer came in, who was waiting for 
some goods from Memphis to take out 
to his farm. My host labored seriously 
with his friend Turner trying to influ- 
ence him to join the lodge, but without 
avail. I noted this with pleasure, and 
when I had an opportunity I handed Mr. 
Turner some of the tracts with the re- 
quest that he read them. I hope they did 
their work. 

While I am writing these words a man 
is standing in front of my window, who 
came to my house four days ago to kill 
me because I preached and his wife 
believed the message. He is a strong 
church man but a stronger lodge man, 
and when his wife repudiated the lodge 
the trouble began. Now the whole town 
is stirred up. Sister Roberson said in 
one of her letters that, if I am to stay 
here, I will have a hard time. Well, the 
hard time is here. I do not know what 
the Lord wills for the future, but please 
pray for me. God's way is right and his 
words are true. 

Some local preachers here, I under- 
stand, have been to the authorities to see 
if I can not be stopped from preaching. 
These fellows pretend to find some fault 
of the doctrine, but since I preach from 
the open Bible that cannot be true. 

The other day I was in a store when a 
young preacher came in. We talked 
quietly a few minutes of the reason why 
the people get angry when I preach. The 
proprietor brought the lodge question up, 
so I gave them both some lodge litera- 
ture that would answer the very points 
they wanted brought out. Then I left. 
Now, everything went through quietly 
and peaceably. There was no argument 
and no anger. Shortly afterward one of 
those who fight against me entered the 
store and poisoned this storekeeper's 
mind, and immediately trouble began 
between him and his wife, who has re- 
pudiated the lodge. Now she has left 
him, so there is more trouble, all because 
the blind guides stand in the door and 
will not go in or suffer those that would 
to go in. I do not know where this 
thing will end, but one thing I do know, 
that without holy lives no man shall see 
the Lord (Heb. 12:14). 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



29 



STANDARD WORKS 

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STANDARD BOOKS 



ON FREEMASONRY 



PINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
60 cents. 

FREEMASONRY: An Interpretation. 

• By Martin L. Wagner, pastor of St. Johns 
English Evangelical Lutheran Church Dayton, 
Ohio, with an introduction by the Rev. G. H. 
Gerberding, D. D., professor of Practical Theol- 
ogy in the Theological Seminary of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church at Chicago, Illinois. 
This is a new book, and is a candid discussion 
of the institution Freemasonry, and offers an 
Interpretation of its veiled expressions, art, 
speech, religion and ethics, and of its symbols, 
emblems and ceremonies. This interpretation 's 
based upon hints given and statements made 
by the highest Masonic authorities and tested 
In the light of sources from which these claim 
that Freemasonry is derived. Cloth, 560 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mall $1.65. 

MASONIC TEMPLES. 

A clear discussion of the religion of Masonry, 
by Pres. C. A. Blanchard. Contents: What is a 
Temple? Not Other Religions But the Christian 
Religion. The Lodge Bible Not the Christian 
Bible. The Masonic Religion Not the Christian 
Religion. Who or What is the Masonic God? 
The Roman Pantheon. Lodge Morals and Chris- 
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FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of Unity Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
Institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
lotee from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
ihe truthfulness of this work and show the 
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accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
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pages, cloth* $1.00; paper cover, 60 centB. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master oil 
Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book 
gives the work and ritual of Blue Lodge 
Masonry, the proper position of each officer 
in the Lodge-room, order of opening and clos- 
ing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry." Illustrated 
with 85 engravings. Contains the "unwrit- 
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to 275 pages; flexible cloth $1.00, paper 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and 
illustrations. It gives the correct method of 
conferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the 
oaths, obligations, signs, grips and passwords. 
All of which are correct and can be relied upon. 
The accuracy of this work has been attested, by 
high and unimpeachable Masonic authority. 
Cloth, $1.25; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to .33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furn-ishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
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work Is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), clotli, $3.00. Per 
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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Coniniandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master. Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages in cloth, $1.50: paper, $1.00. 

EXPLANATORY. 
"Handbook of Freemasonry" and "Chap- 
ter Degrees," and "Knight Templarism 
Illustrated" give the 13 degrees of the York 
Rite. There are 33 degrees In the Scotcrr 
Rite, but the first three degrees as given 
in the "Handbook of Freemasonry" belong 
to both the York and Scotch Rites. These 
five books give 43 different degrees without 
duplicating. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition. 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTL 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
;hree Masonic degrees, in cyplier, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

ADOPTIVE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the 
five degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas 
Lowe, comprising the aegrees of Jephthah's 
Daughter, Ruth, Esther, Martha, and Electa, and 
known as the Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, 
Wife's Degree. Sister's Degree and the Benevolent 
Degree. 50 cents. 

FREEMASONRY EXPOSED 

By Capt. William Morgan. The genuine 
old Morgan Book; republished with engrav- 
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didates, signs, due-guards, grips, etc. This 
revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
nurdered the author for writing it. 35 cents. 



MAH-HAH-BONE. 

Comprising "The Master's Carpet," which 
illustrates and explains the religious symbolism 
of the first three degrees of Freemasonry, and the 
"Hand-Book of Freemasonry," a complete and ac- 
curate exposure of the three degrees of Ancient 
Craft Masonry. By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master 
of Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago, Illinoirs. A 
volume of 679 pages. Cloth, $1.50; 

THE MASTER'S CARPET. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Eey- 
Btone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. Explains the true 
source and religious meaning of every symbol of 
the Blue Lodge, showing the basis on which the 
ritual is founded. By careful perusal of this 
work a thorough linowledge of the spiritual prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry can be obtained. Every 
Mason, every person contemplating becoming a 
member of the fraternity, and even those who 
are indifferent on the subject, should procure and 
carefully read this book. 406 pages, illustrated 
with 50 engravings. This book is out of print 
as a single volume. See "Mah-Hah-Bone" 
above. 

FREEMASONRY AT A GLANCE. 

Containing the illustrated secrets of thirteen 
degrees of Freemasonry; Blue Lodge, Chapter, 
Council and Commandery degrees. Also the 
ceremonies, signs, grips, passwords, etc., de- 
scribed and illustrated. 

Paper cover, 10 cents each. 



OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGPuEEf 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

AMERICAN FREEMASONRY 

"A Study in American Freemasonry," based 

upon Pike's "Morals and Dogma of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite," "Mackey's Masonic 
Ritualist," "The Elncyclopaedia of Freemason- 
ry" and other American masonic standard 
works. By Arthur Preuss, Editor of the Cath- 
olic Fortnightly Review. Among the chapters 
in this book are: "Is American Masonry a Re- 
ligion?" "The God of American Freemasonry," 
"Americarj Freemasonry and the Kabbalistic 
Jehovah," "American Freemasonry and the Bi- 
ble," "Masonic Morality," etc. Cloth, 433 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail 3)1.65. 

MASONIC OATHS NULL AND VOID. 

Or Freemasonry Self-Convicted. This is a 
book for the times. The design of the author 
(Edmond Ronayne) is to refute the arguments of 
those who claim that the oaths of Freemasonry 
are binding upon those who have taken them. 207 
pages ; 40 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF FREE- 
MASONRY 

As proved in court in the New Berlin trial. 
Also the letter of Hon. Richard Rush, to the 
Anti-Masonic Committee of York Co., Pa., 
May 4th, 1831. The New Berlin Trials began 
in the attempt of Freemasons to prevent pub- 
lic initiations by seceding Masons. These 
trials were held at New Berlin, Chenango Co., 
N. Y., April 13 and 14, 1831. General Augus- 
tus C. Welsh, Sheriff of the County, and oth- 
er adhering Freemasons swore to the truth- 
ful revelation of the Oaths and Penalties. 
Slngrle Copy, 10 cents. 

HISTORY OF THE ABDUCTION AND MXJR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 

As prepared by seven committee^ of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 25 
cents. 

HON. THURLOW WEED ON THE MORGAN 
ABDUCTION. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Captain Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal 
to Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario, the discovery of the body at Oak Orchard 
Creek and the two inquests thereon. Mr. Weed 
'testifies from his own personal knowledge of these 
:hrilling events. This pamphlet also con tains an 
mgraving of the monument and statue erected to 
the memory of the martyred Morgan at Batavid, 
N. Y., and unveiled in September, 1882, for which 
occasion Mr. Weed's statement was originally pre- 
pared 5 cents. 
EX-PRESIDENT JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
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these books in print, and they are not in the best 
condition. They can be furnished, in paper, at 
50 cents a copy. 

VALANCE'S CONFESSION OF THE MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 

This confession of Henry L. Valance, on« 
of the three Freemasons who drowned Mor- 
gan in the Niagara River, was taken from 
the lips of the dying man by Dr. Joftn C. 
Emery, of Racine County, Wisconsin, in 1848. 
The confession bears clear evidence of truth- 
fulness. Single copy, 10 cents. 



May, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



31 



WAS WASHINGTON A MASON? 

By President Charles A. Blanchard. This 
is the best contribution yet written on the 
question of Washington's relation to Free- 
masonry. 10 cents. 

WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIR CO- 
PATRIOTS OPPOSED TO SECRET SO- 
CIETIES. 

This booklet contains fifteen portraits of 
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10 cents. 

WASHINGTON. 

What kind of a Freemason was he? 4 pages; 
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STORIES OF THE GODS. 

By I. R. B. Arnold. Brief sketches from the 
mythology of Rome, Greece, Egypt, India, Persia, 
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the relation and unity of the past and present 
systems. The idolatrous worship of the Masonic 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 10 
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MISCELLANEOUS 

MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
Wheaton College, President National Christian As- 
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A brief treatise for busy people and especially 
Intended for ministers and teachers. 

Part first answers objections and clears away 
the obstacles to a candid consideration of the 
fundamental questions involved. Part second 
treats of Freemasonry as the key to the whole 
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other lodges. Part fourth considers important 
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FOLLY, EXPENSE AND DANGER OF SE- 
. CRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, President of Whea- 
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religious ; e, g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfel- 
lowship, the Knights of Pythias, etc. ; political, m 
the Know-Nothings, Knights of the Golden Circle 
the Order of American Deputies, the Ku Klvflt< 
Klan, the White League, etc. ; industrial, as thi' 
unions of carpenters, bricklayers, conductors, en 
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SECRET SOCIETIES ILLUSTRATED. 

Comprising the so-called "secrets" (the 
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REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP I L L U S- 
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The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, En- 
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over one hundred foot-note quotations from stand- 
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REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
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Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
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REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
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MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
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ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA 

) 1899 Ritual as printed by J. W. Franks JSs 
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BBVISBD RED MEN RITUAL. 

The compl«t« illustrated ritual of tha I»pff«ved 
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EXPOSITION OF THE GRANGE 

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FARMER'S EDUCATIONAL AND CO-OP- 
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A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
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THE FORESTERS ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ilustrated ritual with . Installa- 
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of Foresters. 

Paper cover, 35 cents each. 



32 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



May, 1917. 



KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES IL- 
LUSTRATED. 

The complete illustrated ritual and secr«ts of 
the order as used in 1S80. 
Paper cover, 35 cents each. 

LIGHT ON THE LAST DAYS 

A book for the times! Being- familiar studies 
in the boolv of Revelation. By President Charles 
A. Blanchard, D. D., of Wheaton College. We 
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particularly deals. God has written these words 
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are of special importance to us and those who 
succeed us. Cloth, 152 pages. Price 75 cents 
net. By mail 85 cents, 

SECRET SOCIETIES, ANCIENT AND MOD- 
ERN. 

Contents : The Antiquity of Secret Societies, 
The Life of Julian, The Eleusinian Mysteries, The 
Origin of Masonry, Was Washington a Mason? 
Filmore's and Webster's Deference to Masonry in 
the United States, The Tammany Ring, Masonic 
Benevolence, The Uses of Masonry, An liiustra- 
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COLLEGE SECRET SOCIETIES. 

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RONAYNE'S REMINISCENCES 

Being an autobiography of his life and re- 
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ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradlne, D. D., 
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THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
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By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages; 5 cents. 
ODD-FELLOWSHIP JUDGED 

by its own utterances; its doctrine and practice 
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This is an exceedingly interesting, clear dis- 
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SERMON ON SECRETISM 

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ent to all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
ACY. 

Address of President J. Blanchard. This is 
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SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

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PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
TIES. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
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ARE IMASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THB 
INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate them. 
5 cents. 

THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST 

By Richard Horton. The Secret Empire 
Is a subject of prophecy. "Examine," says 
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"History of Freemasonry" is the history of 
the Image. Cloth, 60 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SEORBT 
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A most convincing argument against fellow- 
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SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, pastor United Pres- 
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MASONIC SALVATION 

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religion that saves men from all sin, and purifies 
them for heaven." 20 cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THL 

CHRISTIAN REUGION. 

By "Spectator," Atlanta, Qa. 16 pas«Sf 
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SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. James Williams, Presiding Elder of 
Dakota District, Northwestern Iowa Conference 
of the M. E. church — a seceding Master Mason. 
5 cents. 

BETWEEN TWO OPINIONS. 

By Miss E. E. Flagg, author of "Little People," 
"A Sunny Life," etc. Every one who loves to 
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should read this book upon the power of secret 
societies in politics, and the remedy. 389 pages ; 
olotli, 50 cents. 

THE MYSTIC TIE; 

Or Freemasonry a League with the Devil. 
This is an account of the church trial of Peter 
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MOODY CHURCH TESTIMONIALS. 

This valuable booklet contains the brief testi- 
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first fifty years of it.a existence. 64 pages. 15 
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CONGREGATIONAL TESTIMONIES. 

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heavy paper cover, 15 cents. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

A discussion of their character and claims, 
by Rev. David MacDill, Pres. J. Blanchard and 
Rev. Edward Beecher. 96 pages; paper cover; 
15 tents each. 

THE LODGEVILLE CHURCH. 
or A Woman's Victory. 

A story of a church in which the lodge Influ- 
ence is felt in its prayer meetings and other ao 
tJvHleii. 24 pages and cover. Price 5 cents. 



SPECIAL BARGAINS 

Reductions on Antisecret 
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SEARCH LIGHTS ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 



Our InTcntory shows about forty differ- 
ent kinds of books and pamphlets — odds 
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This list offers a fine selection of litera- 
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SCRAP BOOKS 

Containing: 31 "Cynosure" (old series) tracta. 
A valuable collection of antllodge UteratUTe, 
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PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
THE SIXTH ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION, N. C. A. 

At Syracuse, N. T., 1874. Addresses by Rev. 

B. T. Roberts, Chas. D. Green (Mayor of Ba- 
tavla, N. Y., during Morgan excitement), Pres. 

C. A. Blanchard, Rev. D. P. Rathbun, Rev. J. 
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PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
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VENTION, N. C. A. 

At Pittsburgh. Pa,, 1875. Addresses by Rev. 
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R. W. Sloane, D.D., Pres. J. Blanchard, Rer. 
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others. Paper cover, 96 pages, price 20 cents. 



LIGHT ON FREEMASONRY, APPEI*- 
DIX TO 

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FIVE IN ONE 

Morgan's Ebcposltlon; History of the Abduc- 
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LETTERS ON FREEMASONRY TO 
THE FRATERNITY 

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RITUi^VLS. 



PATRIARCHS MILITANT 

Adopted by Sov. Grand Lodge, Independent 
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GOOD TEMPLARISM 

An exposition 
Council degrees. 



of the Lodge, Temple. 
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KNIGHTS OF LABOR 

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KNIGHTS OF THE ORIENT 

Ritual of the Ancient Order of the Orient; 
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BSMIMISCEKCBS OF MOBGAN TIMBS. 

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REVIEW OF TWO MASONIC AD- 
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CONDEMNATION OF SBCRST tO- 
CIETIBS 

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DIVORCE AND REMARRIAGE 

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SECRECY AND CITIZENSHIP 

"Prize SSssayfir" discussing the evils of secret 
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SERMONS AND ADDRESSES ON SE- 
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HOLDEN WITH CORDS 

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BROKEN SEAL, THE 

Personal reminiscences of the Abduction and 
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member with William Morgan of the Masonic 
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famous anti-Masonic lecturer and because of tt 
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MYSTICAL LIFE. THE, AND HOUSE- 
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GRAND LODGE MASONRY 

Its relation to Civil Government and jAe 
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CAN I BE A FREEMASON AND A 
CHRISTIAN? 

By J. J. Bruce, of Rolfe, Iowa. Tlie author 
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GURY'S DOCTRINES OF THE 

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"The Doctrines of the Jesuits, translated Into 
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SECRET INSTRUCTIONS OF THE 

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A PRIEST 

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THE OPEN CONFESSION. 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
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The relation of the Christian, and especially 
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A Personal Testimony. — Three things that 
kept Dr. Gray from joining a lodge. 

Attacking Principles, Not Persons. — ^Thls is 
within our guaranteed constitutional rights and 
is of fundamental importance. 

Describing a Mighty Adversary.— Not merely 
an evil influence, but a personal spiritual being 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beings like 
himself. And what this Bnemy can do and is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System. — Showing 
that it is truly contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 5 cents a 
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CHRISTIAN WORKERSr TRACTS. 

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Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
S50 W. MadisoB St CHICAQO. ILL, 




VoLL 



CHICAGO, JUNE, 1917 



Number 2 




Cbe Ciabtbearer of San Salvador 

mUburT. Cram 

Qlbo bore tbe llgbt Columbus sm. 
Pacing bis dec1( witb storm-tossea soul, 
fits bopes witb mutinous f tars at wan 
mben it was darkest ere tbe aawn unrolled? 

Some Indian toiler, early at bis cbores, 
l)is lantern rude sbining witb feeble ray; 
no tbougbt it leralded tbe long sougbt sbores, 
€be morning star of tbe world's coming day« 

$0 wbatm lowliness we do or bear 
Sends belpful ligbt to otber straining eyes; 
Tn beaoen at last we sball tbe story bear, 
Httd bear our bonors witb a glad surprise* 



no longer forward nor bebind 

T looH in bope or fear$ 
But, grateful, take tbe good T find, 

tbe best of now and bere. 

€ttougb tbat blessings undeserved 
l)aoe marked my erring track; 

Cbat wberesoe'er my feet baoe swerped, 
1)is cbastening turned me back; 

SCbat more and more a Providence 

Of lope is understood, 
[making tbe springs of time and sense 

Sweet witb eternal good. 

r-3. 6. UPblttier. 




OmciAU ORCS^AN* 
lOCENTJ" ACOPY 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN AJJOCIATION 
ZST/kBUSHED (8£>& k.00 AYEAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

PiibUshed Monthly by thm National Christian 
Association. 



JAMES EDWIN PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor. 

850 West Madiaoo Street, Chicago. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 
PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 
PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
'make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensumg 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. i. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
March 3, 1875. 



CONTENTS 



The Lightbearer of San Salvador, poem by 

Wilbur F. Crafts Cover 

Day by Day, poem by W. J. Swigart 33 

Wink by Juror Causes Mistrial — Boston 

Journal 33 

Elks Would Seize Boy Scouts 33 

American Society of Equity 33 

Disappointed 34 

Camels of the World 34 

Boy Scout Propaganda Going Before 

8,000,000 34 

Elks Convention Budget 34 

Death at Moose Initiation Costs $18,000... 35 

Leading Insurance Orders, 1916 36 

Killed in Frat Initiation — Detroit News... 37 
To Eradicate Frats From High Schools ... 38 

Matthew 16: 18-19 38 

Confucian Candidates Challenged, by "In- 
spector" 39 

Cabletow Fraternity — Quarterly Bulletin, 

Iowa Masonic Library 40 

Get Somebody Else, poem by Paul Law- 
rence Dunbar 41 

Effect of the Lodge on National Life, by 

Rev. E. A. Crooks 41 

Elk's "Lodge of Sorrow" — The Elks-Antler 45 
A "High Frolic" — Masonic Home Journal. 46 

Martin Luther 47 

Grange Secrecy, by J. C. Young 47 

Glimpses of the Secret World, by Mead A. 

Kelsey 49 

Labor Lodge Leaders on Liquor — Anti- 
Prohibition Manual 49 

Family Affairs of the Gompers — from the 

Daily Press 61 

Fraternity Scholarship 53 

John Quincy Adams, Letters of 54 

Dies After Initiation 66 



Editorial : 

A Bereaved Mother. ... , 55 

Masonry in Politics 66 

A Veteran Maccabee Vanishes 66 

Straws in the Wind 57 

A Credit to Princeton 67 

A Ball and a Squeal 57 

Here Are Seven Reasons 68 

Lax or Indifferent 68 

Confessedly Unusual 59 

What We Miss 69 

Beyond Computation 60 

News of Our Work: 

Report of Annual Meeting 60 

*Testimony of Rev. A. B. Simpson 60 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 61 

Report of Southern Agent, Rev. F. J, 

Davidson 62 

"Lizzie Woods* Letter" 63 

A Christian Worker— Mrs. Hannah 

Chandler 64 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 
GENERAL OFFICERS. 
President Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president. Rev. Thomas M. Slater; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomai C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kit- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H, Lea- 
man, George Slager and W. I. Phillips. 



LECTURERS. 



Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St, 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Qemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, EUendale, N. D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck, Grafton. Calif. 

Eld. G. B. Crockett. Dermott Ark. 



Vol. L, No. 2. 



CHICAGO 



June, 1917 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 


him: I 


spake 


openly 


to the 


world. 


and in 


secret 


have 1 


said nothing. 


—Joh 


n 18:20 



DAY BY DAY. 

BY W. J. SWIGART. 

'Tis evening now. The day is done ; 
Its toils were hard, with burdens 
pressed. 
I'm tired now — my strength well 
gone — 
I thank thee, Lord, for night and rest. 

The night is gone. 'Tis morning now ; 
My rest was sweet — no toil-pangs 
lurk. 
My mind refreshed, my strength re- 
newed : 
I thank Thee now for day and work. 
— Siinday School Times. 



WINK BY JUROR CAUSES MISTRIAL. 



Judge King Takes Away Damage Case in 
Superior Court. 



An indiscreet wink by a juror, as he 
was passing out of the Superior Court 
yesterday, caused Judge King to take 
away the $30,000 suit brought by John 
McAleer against C. N. Kimball & Co., 
arising out of injuries received by Mc- 
Aleer in being struck on Charles street 
by an automobile owned by the defend- 
ants. 

Incidentally, the insignia of a secret 
order had something to do with the case, 
although it was not the proximate cause 
of a mistrial. One of the jurors and a 
witness called for the plaintiff wore sim- 
ilar fraternal badges, and an attorney 
says he saw a wink exchanged between 
the juror and the witness. 

This led Judge King to remark that 
hereafter all jurors and witnesses should 
refrain from wearing anv insig^nia of 



fraternal associations while on duty. 
Boston Journal, April 26, 191 7. 



ELKS WOULD SEIZE BOY SCOUTS. 

Scoutmaster Charles D. Chase of Lo- 
gansport Boy Scouts of America will 
appear before the regular meeting of 
Logansport lodge No. 66, B. P. O. Elks 
to-night and present the matter of the 
Boy Scout movement. The Elks have 
under consideration the taking of the 
Boy Scouts under their wing as a part 
of the Big Brother program of the B. 
P. O. Elks. — Pharas Reporter, Logans- 
port, Ind., Apr. 26, 1917. 



"AMERICAN SOCIETY OF EQUITY." 

This is an organization that teaches 
co-operation among farmers. Its Na- 
tional Headquarters are at Wausau, 
Wis., where its constitution and by-laws 
may be obtamed, if the reqtiest be ad- 
dressed to Secretary, Mr. H. G. Tank. 

So far as I am informed there is no 
objection to this organization, but on 
the contrary it is to be commended. The 
members do not have to take an oath 
or obligation, neither is there any re- 
Hgious service in the local Union. The 
only thing of a religious nature is that 
at the opening of the state or national 
conventions some one is asked to lead 
in prayer. They do not have any chap- 
plains. There are no secrets and non- 
members are welcome to its meetings. 
The Union may hold executive meetings 
to which only members are invited if 
there are good reasons for doing so. A 
member is not obligated to sell his prod- 
uce through the association, nor to buy 
through them. He is left free to Iniy 
or sell as he or she sees fit. 



34 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



We are under obligations to Rev. A. 
W. ^[eyer. of Pease, Minn., for the in- 
formation which we are able to give our 
readers of this co-operative society 



DISAPPOINTED. 

An editorial in the February Odd-Fcl- 
lozi' Reviezv says in part : "Observation 
and information from widely extended 
sources create the conviction, that in all 
parts of the country there are a great 
many men — perhaps many thousands — 
of intelligence and character, influential 
in their communities and interested in 
the higher purposes and ideals of fra- 
ternity, who are either still members of 
our order — but never, or very rarely, at- 
tend — or have lapsed from membership, 
for reasons primarily not because of the 
burden of paying dues. . . . They 
entered with an impression of the order's 
great purposes and high ideals ; but, in 
the lodge they joined, they found much 
of the coarse, sordid, petty things, of a 
temporarily dominant, ignorant element. 
They found little or no uplifting senti- 
ment ; they found an atmosphere without 
warmth, or the promise of helpfulness to 
anything worth while. Disappointment 
was natural, and was speedily followed 
by indifiference — perhaps, even contempt. 
This is no conjectural answer, but the 
fairly composite reply of many explana- 
tions. Great and strong as we are, we 
may be palsied, or even utterly broken 
down, by the mere dead weight of 
ignorant members." 



"CAMELS OF THE WORLD." 

We were about to say that this was 
one of the newer insurance lodges, but 
if we had, how we would have exposed 
our ignorance, for the first thing that 
it says about itself is that it is "the old- 
est and best" and continues to enlarge 
upon its age. "The Order of Camels 
was established in Arabia in pre-historic 
times ; it crossed the waters and was 
established here ; and to-day the Temples 
know the sands of the Desert, even as 
we work them to-day." 

"The regular initiation fee is $30, 
but by special dispensation from the 
Supreme Temple the initiation fee has 
been reduced to $5 for a short time." 

The Camels of the World "invites all 



good men to membership" providing 
they are white and "twenty-one years 
of age and believe in a Supreme Being." 
It has "for its cardinal principle the 
Fatherhood of God and the Brother- 
hood of Man." 

Its printed matter says, ''Hey, Jerry ! 
Get a hump on you. You'll feel young- 
er, healthier and more manly after a 
Camel initiation. The Camels take care 
of its members — morally, physically and 
socially. They certainly are a lively 
bunch." 

The Supreme Commissioner of the 
Camels of the World is C. Herbel Mor- 
ris, address. Camels' Building, 45 South 
Fourth street, Minneapolis, Minn. 



BOY SCOUT PROPAGANDA GOING 
BEFORE 8,000,000. 

New York, March 19. — Inauguration of a 
movement through which the Boy Scouts of 
America hope to place the benefits of the or- 
ganization before 8,000,000 boys of scout age 
was announced here today. Field secretaries 
are to visit cities and towns throughout the 
country to carry on organization work. 

At the close of 1916, 245,073 boys and men 
were registered as scouts and scout officials, 
as compared with 181,522 on Dec. 31, 1915. Of 
these 54,345 were adults. — Chicago Herald, 
March 20, 1917. 



ELKS' CONVENTION BUDGET. 

Past Grand Exalted Ruler James R. 
Nicholson is devoting many hours to his 
duties as president of the Boston Con- 
vention Association, and has burned 
many quarts of midnight oil. That the 
1917 convention will be the greatest con- 
vention in the history of the Order is 
nov^ an assured fact ; here is the tenta- 
tive budget of expenditures : 
Decorations and illuminations. . .$20,000 

Entertainment I5»ooo 

Prizes 76^ 

Publicity and printing 7^500 

Office expenses 7yS^^ 

Headquarters and registration.. 2,500 

Halls 2,000 

Badges 6,000 

Reception, bands, etc 5»o<^ 

Miscellaneous 2,000 

Total .....' $75,000 

From that $15,000 entertainment 
fund they ought to buy enough booze 
to at least tickle the palates of the 
thirsty herd. 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



35 



DEATH AT MOOSE INITIATION 

COSTS $18,000. 

Initiate Killed by Electric Shock From 

"Branding Board." 

Washington, May 7, 191 7. — By refus- 
ing to review Alabama court proceed- 
ings, the supreme court to-day put into 
effect decrees awarding $18,000 damages 



That this feature was not a regular part 
of the initiation, but impromptu "horse- 
play" of local lodge members, was con- 
tended, unsuccessfully by the supreme 
lodge. 



We reproduce herewith pictures and 
description of the branding outfit, to- 




against the supreme lodge of the Loyal 
Order of Moose for the death of Donald 
A. Kenney during initiation at the Bir- 
mingham, Ala., lodge. 

Kenney died after receiving an elec- 
tric shock from a ''brandino^ board." 



gether with the "suggestions" for using 
it, found on pages 26 and IX of the De 
Moulin Bros. & Co.'s catalogue. The 
outfit costs $17.00. 

"The Branding and Whirling Table." 
''Jtist think of a candidate being brand- 
ed with a hot ( ?) electric brand and 



Ob 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



when the shock is supposed to have killed 
him, to drop him, table and all, into an 
old well, 'end over end,' and then bring 
him up uninjured. This beats riding the 
fuzzie-backed goat or sliding down the 
cellar steps." 

Then follows the ritualistic ceremony 
of branding, ''suggested" on page IX : 

A More Severe Way of Using the Branding 

Outfit — With Operating and Whirling 

Table. 

Officer: "]\Iy friend, you have so far 
proved yourself worthy of becoming a 
member of our Order. Some of the tests 
were to teach you valuable lessons which 
you will no doubt not soon forget. Oth- 
ers were to amuse our brothers, but you 
will now have to undergo a painful or- 
deal before registering your name on our 
records. This Organization is probably 
the onlv one which brands each of its 
members." 

(The attendants will prepare for the 
branding.) 

''Now, my friend, let me assure you, 
while the branding is painful, it is not 
dangerous. We have had but one die 
from the results of blood poison and one 
of heart failure, but your blood is in good 
condition, and judging from your nerve 
in withstanding all former tests, I do not 
think there is any danger of blood poison 
or heart failure." 

Officer: ''Attendants, prepare the can- 
didate to be branded ; fasten him securely 
to the operating table and have the brand 
heated red hot so it will burn our mark 
well into his flesh." 

(Attendants hoodwink candidate and 
strap him securely to whirling board pre- 
pared especially for the purpose. Unbutton 
candidate's shirt so as to brand him on the 
breast.) 

Officer: "Chief Brander, is the iron 
good and hot, and are you ready to per- 
form your duty?" 

Chief Brander: ''Officer, the iron is 
hot and I am ready to perform my duty." 

OfRcer: "Then apply the brand." 

(Chief Brander advances and applies the 
Electric brand.) 

"Great horrors! He is dead! He has 
been unable to withstand so severe a test, 
and he lies dead upon the table !" 

(Much confusion and many suggestions 
as to better way to dispose of body, it be- 
ing finally decided to bear it away and de- 
posit it in an old well near the hall. After 
marching several times around room and 
through doors, carrying candidate with 



whirling board on their shoulders, a halt is 
called at the place where frame work for 
"whirling board" is placed, and the hooks 
are quietly attached to the rings at ends. 
Attendants whisper to each other to drop 
body head first into well, when, at a given 
sign, candidate is given a whirl which sends 
him spinning "end over end." The board 
is then stopped and attendants quietly walk 
a little distance away, discussing in a low 
tone, so that candidate can hear, whether 
or not he was really dead. One will saj^ 
that he thinks he saw him move, etc., etc. 
Finally they decide to draw him up out of 
the well and return him to the lodge room 
for careful examination. They quietly step 
up to candidate, give him another whirl and 
then take him on their shoulders again, 
walking around lodge hall a few times, 
when they come to a halt and lay him down. 
One then addresses Ofiicer:) 

"We took this body to the old well, 
and, after letting it down, some of the 
brothers had good reasons to believe that 
the candidate was not dead, so we drew 
him up again and brought him back for a 
careful examination." 

Officer: "You did well under such cir- 
cumstances to return wdth him, as in the 
event that he might have life, he could 
have called assistance by loud cries, and 
the discovery of our deed would end in 
serious results." 

(Officer advances, feels candidate's pulse 
and places his ear over candidate's heart 
and exclaims:) 

"The heart still beats, and he is now 
breathing!" "Attendants, unbind him." 

(Attendants unbind, remove hoodwink, 
and stand him on his feet.) 

Officer: (Shaking hands with candi- 
date, says:) "My friend, I congratulate 
you on your nerve through this test. We 
are always glad to have men of iron 
nerve to become members of our grand 
Order." 



LEADING INSURANCE ORDERS 
1916. 

From records furnished The Fraternal 
Monitor, it is seen that Modern Wood- 
men of America, as usual, leads all other 
fraternal beneficiar\^ societies. During 
the year 19 16, IModern Woodmen of 
America wrote 125,822 new certificates. 
The next highest was the Woodmen of 
the World. Sovereign Camp, which wrote 
121,617. The third in the list was the 
Brotherhoood of American Yeomen, Des 
Moines, 48,284. Fourth in the list was 
Royal Neighbors of America, Rock 
Island, 42,646. — Modern Woodmen Mag- 
azine, April, 19 1 7. 



JiwnKi, 1'917 



CHJRI'STiAiN' CYNOSURJ 



KILLED IN FEAT miTIATIOM. 



ScxEi Gif Meckko^ist Mjoccister ILo^jiiDed IDiimis 

SiUikdaj IiuBtiiaTaQciL 

EsltI B,. Rice, v ■ .- - • •. "ii»rfakefc 

m a faJl dinriocifg: .a ftca- 

termiiity r ' "\ -t.s. 

.:...:'.._. ibe''^'-'- -"-oiflii (ieprariw silaerTjffis 

wtemit to Ea<.: scbool acnd asked 

few J.ack \^\.jt..z /'ibn Heinin' Lsi'ioffibs, 

Jr.. Fred Libbe anc Ecwajpd Geisft, said 

■■: ■■ -■- .-ears Oif tine fn-aitennnitjy iortiiD 



: -•:}' was 

Gra<ae rocunii piiadipail^ started tbait lHae 

first two uaaotted weire .mcit im sdaood anofd 

rtflaait tlline cAers wea^ 'ginatdnttartted lasft 

T 

- " ^ l^iem^s&Bi [BiisliWDfp., prinaciipall of 
sdaool, who is rmmvdmrrtnnrtg- 

: . „ . -.^jm of Ms G^wii, wbdch s® 

lar Jaas beem fmniitiiess., said itot Ibe 
woiraiid .gjet m t-mA wMd. ^tOne jxn-osecm- 
T-^ir's fitffice iiTEEmediraitieilnr .anad jxTtsdiice Hloe 

.'■- ce ^^as 17 f«eaDTS <qM, ittoe stiBii -of libe 

'<ev. E. S.. IRace, ^275 Bd^^tere a^'eBniKL, 

r-ecretairx^ -oif Hike emfdovwamemt cotniDDnnrtifeee 

f Ihs MetllntodirSt Eipiscoipail dnnnircin anad 

-•'— .erlj pastor otf nii^ ©iimnii^ Av'einnne 

•r. dnnnrrda. 

-:h Mrr. Kiice 'hs.^s said Hbait "be 

A j)iiT06ecnflfte rtibe Ibo'^s,, Cbaffiies 

■-'ixwskii, jwni>sec.init]iE!Kg: ailitoiiiiaeT, 

-,^.,;.- ur:ait bee wM see tbe nuaititier 

y.TnTO(Tn;|^ik to tbe fed^. 

Wtfll Wagae Oat Fcttjs. 

■"[[ft iw: Terr laeairl}- marnsiitiri^biiKr.r' hs 

-•■ jit a :iniiaittifir to be tireattijed 

^ ; li n^fiMm^ wl&t^ caun be 

: w^ carm ^ait feast dfeann mat I&k liira- 

• >'- iRibidb e^ist coanttiWT t© Hskw iim 

•--raitiGiin was eibtaiinaed Twr iSiGiberr 

^ '-:■-.■:■. assistannit jxrfj>sec!i]r!rOT:. isiibo "t^s- 

'-0(ce air tbe bospittail. Mqiid- 

/T. stml canttscionas. said "ttot 

a^seed to cliimb ,a iaddeer.. 

- - anad atbonnt ihs ei^jbcfti rrm^ 

•ed amxd Iscttdeed (ml bis ibead. 

•nt. Mi. Sipeed sa3"s.. he was 

■r -g -rrrrmrt;*. vho iitrnfelTed bilS: 

,- to fea^^. Hte 
- "WTas caOIied to 
■ ^nBtnrGiin:? esKntted 



noft taSssBL Mr. Speed, ib©we\'er. <(^ 
tained "aaora^fb fniaflaaes otf libe 'bo^vs to es- 

ablte ibim to §0 albead w-irtib tbe ,i©-\"esti- 
.gaitioffli,. ;bnDft these sanaes are tor the 
,ptFeseiDit wrthhel-d. 

jQnesckms Masgr Boys. 

[Dr.. BttAop im bis innvestigaitionD ^xkas 
mmrmsx^ qnaestaoiiaed UQOire than a doaen 
(bcKv^ beilieved to be 'lonrtimabers of fra- 
ffeeomtaes. bust aill dtemed the^- wrere p^es- 
eiDit ait tbe :k!DJtiaitiQn. He asked a©y boy 
m tbe scbooil who was presei!n: to ctame 
ioirw^ajFd, brat mort onae so far has adniiit- 
ted ;k]a(ixwled^^e oif the nuartitier. 

Fraitenmities in .bagb schools are barred 
.by state law, bnnit the machiaaerT^ 5i»r 
.their exminctioiia is said to be so coiDaber- 
soinae since the :ia\w was passed I>r. 
;Bi-sho[p ;bas .iaboired in ^Taim to siiop< se- 
•crert oirgaonizaitioffiis. The wsMonty fic 
discipliine lies m tbe :bauads Oii the sxi- 
perimieiadteiDrt -of schools amd the boai^d 
<©if ■ednacaticm, but lit ha^ been posaibie 
£oir the stnadtenn:s to targam^e wiiih coicn- 
pairam^e impTanrifty becaiise 011 the disc- 
cniM^ 'Of (nbtaaimnag: ^ahd eT-idence agaimsr 
:thena. 
f^cxDOpaib Accept HanoEarj Iflfixnoerships. 

Pmpiis at Zasiiem •b:i:^r. saic ::^a: ::rter^ 
wenre ait feast iiaree \»(ei-4c!ao\^m xra-aerrdi- 
tfes :in the school, tlhe Deliiia Gmmsxs.. the 
Ki Si^jma iKi.-and the Phi Ki. Mai^y 
asserted posiiiiwtely thai yoirsa^ Si'je was 
to .havi"<e been initiatted m the Sir si ^laraec.. 
bintt (Siscjaikned an^i- knaov^ifedt^ ?ii \Ti:he:::- 
■er ithis iraiieCTniB- aGtinaill.T had rmiiaied 
ikmsi. IDb^y said that :5raienj3iiies e^nst- 
•■ed imder toieranace .in al DeuTuini hi^r 
sohodis anad thai an sossk cases prraci- 
jpails ibax^^e .aceeplted .honrOTrar}" memiter- 
shiips. 

Accocnfei^ to itlhe sKiry .as pfeced iiir 
aitter lihe 'hm- Sell, !his cosupaaioirs 
picked boBD vip .and aSier a ie.w mo- 
memts oii ffiisbeSi^f f-amid nhsr: he was 
mrabie to stand aione. F-rigmened. "hey 
carried .him lO' the hoir-se of a pbj-si-zrian 
wihose nasae has .not jiTet been asce*"- 
'tainEed. anad .mrtanc 'ilhere. tvtio of the 
oflcder bofx^ 'took him honie. Eie -wras a: 
that 'tinsK pacal^^'i^ed beirz^w ihe shoniders. 

Dtr. A'eimon I. Hooper, the Si^ fair- 
!% jpiw^cian. iound that the .rniii -^-er- 
teteaee iiTas Sracrnred. r>r. Eace "w^bo 
v:a£^ mxt 'OC the city., -w-as called home. 
anxd Moncte" iftK 'hm- wrsts taken tt- Har- 
dier lh(&6pbail. vihe!^ X^ray ,photqgraph^ 



38 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



by Dr. C. D. Brooks confirmed Dr. 
Hooper's diagnosis. An operation was 
performed, but the chances of recovery 
were found to be slight and the boy 
never rallied. His parents and Dr. H. 
Lester Smith, pastor of the Central M. 
E. church, were with him when he died. 
The boy was a senior at school and 
would have been graduated in June. 
He was a member of the track team and 
popular among the students. — Detroit 
Xe-a'S, April 24, 191 /. 

TO ERADICATE FRATS FROM HIGH 
SCHOOLS. 

Springtield, May 16. — The house, in 
the face of bitter opposition of thou- 
sands of high school students of the 
state, is about to place on the statute 
books of the state, the Turnbaugh bill 
which eradicates fraternities and sorori- 
ties from the high schools of the state. 
The opposition in the house to secret 
organizations in high schools was al- 
most unanimous. 

The bill will be sent to the senate, 
where the house amendments — all mi- 
nor changes — undoubtedly will be con- 
curred in and the bill sent to Governor 
Lowden for his signature. 

The victory of the antifraternities fol- 
lows several unsuccessful battles in the 
general assembly. Conditions, however, 
have been growing steadily worse, it is 
contended, and victory from the begin- 
ning was certain. 

The main provisions of the bill fol- 
low : 

Prohibits any student or pupil en- 
rolled in the common free schools of 
this state from joining, becoming 
pledged to, or promising to join any fra- 
ternity, sorority or other secret society, 
the membership of which is composed 
wholly or in part of students or pupils 
enrolled in such school, and prescribing 
that school directors and boards of edu- 
cation, school inspectors, and other cor- 
porate authorities, managing and con- 
trolling any of the common free schools, 
shall enforce the provisions of the bill. 
Prohibits any person from soliciting any 
such student or pupil to join, pledge 
himself, or promise to join, any such 
fraternity or sorority or secret society, 
and provides that any person violating 



any of the provisions of the bill shall 
be fined from $25 to $100 for every 
offense. — Journal-Standard, Freeport, 
111., May 16, 1917. 



'Anti-Fraternity Bill" Passed at Springfield. 

Springfield, 111., May 17. — The House 
to-day passed Senator Turnbaugh's bill 
prohibiting fraternities in high schools. 
— Chicago Examiner, May 18, 19 17. 



MATTHEW 16:18-19. 

Professor G. Frederick Wright, D. D., 
LL.D., geologist and archaeologist of 
Oberlin, in a recent lecture at The 
Moody Bible Institute of Chicago on the 
Historic Evidences of Christianity, re- 
lated an interesting find in the cele- 
brated Spanish manuscript of the New 
Testament owned by the late J. Pier- 
pont Morgan, and whose worth is esti- 
mated at $30,000. In its recent decipher- 
ment by the Latin expert, Rev. E. S. 
Buchanan, of England, the celebrated 
passage, Matthew 16:18, 19 about Peter 
and the keys of the kingdom of heaven, 
is found to read, "on this rock, the Holy 
Spirit will build up my church," and 
again "whatsoever the Holy Spirit shall 
bind on earth shall be bound in heaven." 

Dr. Wright added, that the same ex- 
pert had more recently been engaged by 
Colin Huntington of New York, to de- 
cipher a similar manuscript in the costly 
collection in his museiim, in which he 
found the same reading. And he said 
that this gave new interest to what Bible 
scholars know as the "Western manu- 
scripts" in distinctions from the text of 
Westcott & Hort. 



The second Annual Missionary Rally 
of the Moody Church under pastorate 
of Rev. Paul Rader will be held in the 
Moody Tabernacle, corner North Clark 
and North avenues, from Wednesday 
evening. May 30th, to Sunday, June 3d. 
About a dozen Boards will be repre- 
sented with missionaries from some of 
the fields. It is expected that this gath- 
ering will be much greater than that of 
a year ago, when over two hundred 
young people volunteered for the for- 
eign field and over $10,000 in cash and 
pledges were raised. The rally is open 
to all who may wish to attend. 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



39 



Confucian Candidates Challenged 



The Masonic grand master of Massa- 
chusetts seeks to justify chartering a 
pagan lodge in Pekin, China, by assert- 
ing that "We may find Monotheism pro- 
claimed ... in the Book of Kings of 
the Chinese." There is no Chinese Book 
of Kings, but he obviously means the 
Shoo King (Shu King), ''Book of His- 
tory," and not the She King (Shi King), 
''Book of Poetry," nor Yih King, "Book 
of Changes." The Shoo King history 
beginning 2356 B. C, ends 781 B. C, 
exactly 230 years before the birth of 
Confucius. If this ancient book, writ- 
ten in his own language and carefully 
cherished and "transmitted" by him to 
his followers, "proclaims Monotheism," 
it is surprising that the famous phi- 
losopher himself practiced polytheistic 
worship, and advised the practice of 
polytheism. 

The very first reference to worship to 
be found in Chinese literature occurs 
near the beginning of the Shoo King, 
to which the grand master appeals. It 
not only fails to "Proclaim Monothe- 
ism," but even includes as objects wor- 
shipped, "The Six Honoured Ones, the 
hills, the rivers, and the host of spirits." 
It also includes Shang-te, which modern, 
native Chinese commentators incline to 
interpret as signifying the azure sphere, 
with its included rotation of seasons, and 
production, and life. This is first in 
rank, and "earth" is second. The phe- 
nomena and separate objects which each 
includes, are also worshipped. Such are, 
for instance, stars above and streams be- 
low. The rank of Shang-te is supreme 
among objects worshipped ; but the 
grand master forgets that rank among 
divinities implies plurality, while plur- 
aHty is itself the distinctive essence of 
polytheism. A more personal concep- 
tion of Shang-te still makes him one 
among objects worshipped, leaving rank 
and plurality unaffected. 

Monotheism is hardly "proclaimed" in 
the Shoo King midway between the 
foregoing period and that of the New 
Testament, where the leader of a rebel- 
lion denounces the ruler for not serving 
Shang-te, nor the Spirits of heaven and 
earth, nor his ancestors, whose temple he 



neglects. This re1)ellion occurred six 
centuries before Confucius saw the Shoo 
King; but though he became its recog- 
nized editor, aware of what it "pro- 
claimed," still it made no Monotheist of 
him. He worshipped as a polytheist, and 
also advocated polytheism, as if he had 
never heard of Monotheism or found it 
"proclaimed" in the Shoo King. 
Animism. 

There remains a fundamental theory 
which is more comprehensive than many 
of the particular features that actually 
fix the plain brand of plurality of gods 
on the brow of every Confucian. For 
example : ancestor worship, alone, would 
completely exclude Monotheism. And, 
again, that complete coalescence of the 
"Three religions," Confucianism, Tao- 
ism, and Buddhism, which leaves 
them three sects of "One religion," 
as the Chinese truly claim, makes 
the plural worship of each the 
common polytheism of. all. This 
threefold cord binds all, Confucians in- 
cluded, to a common paganism. But to 
worship in any temple or with any ritual 
that happens to be convenient, indis- 
criminately, or to employ now one priest 
now another haphazard, is apparently a 
somewhat exoteric feature of Chinese 
religion. There is nevertheless a funda- 
mental theory or esoteric principle, on 
whose broad foundation Confucianism 
immovably stands planted where Mono- 
theism cannot come. .That theory is 
Animism.. Every Confucian must be- 
lieve that objects in nature called inani- 
mate are animate. As such, he worships 
them. To him, the running river lives ; 
the fixed mountain also is alive ; and 
both are divine. 

An Impossible Combination. 

Since Animism is fundamental and in- 
separable, while its inevitable effect ap- 
pears in plural worship, no Chinese can 
truly adopt Monotheism and retain ac- 
tual Confucian existence for an instant. 
He could as truly be dead and alive at 
the same time. Yet the grand lodge 
proposition is, that this impossibility is 
not only possible, but actual.. It ante- 
dates Confucius and many of the ances- 
tors he worshipped if it appears in the 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



"Book of History," the SJioo King. A 
Confucian can be a Mason if he is a 
Monotheist ; but he cannot be a Mono- 
theist without, in the act, ceasing to be a 
Confucian. Animism kncws no Mono- 
theism : ^lonotheism instantly annihil- 
lates animism ; noonday and midnight 
will sooner exist together. The Chinese 
should therefore have sent their belated 



"Alpha Chapter, the Cabletow Frater- 
nity, was organized April 6, 19 16, and 
absorbed the Masonic Club at the Kansas 
City Dental College. The Masonic Club 
had tried for several years to acquire an 
Acacia charter, but on learning, over a 
year ago that v/e need never expect to 
receive one, and feeling the need of an 
orpanization such as ours is, we founded 




petition in those earlier days of Free- 
masonry when, as the grand master 
shows by a quotation which says, 'Tn an- 
cient times Masons were charged in ev- 
ery country to be of the religion of that 
country or nation, whatever it was," they 
would have been charged to be polythe- 
ists because Masons, and also as Con- 
fucians. 

Inspector. 



CABLETOW FRATERNITY. 

A new fraternity under the above title 
was organized the past year at Kansas 
City, Missouri. In order to acquaint our 
readers with the objects and aims of the 
fraternity, we quote from a communica- 
tion received from the Secretary of the 
extension work. This fraternity will 
doubtless be organized in many institu- 
tions of learning where the Acacia does 
not exist, and we trust will prove of 
lasting benefit to young men who become 
members thereof. 



the first chapter. The Vice President of 
the Acacia Fraternity in charge of the 
extension work advised us that they 
could not grant a charter to any school 
with an attendance of less than 2,500 
students, or to any school teaching only 
one subject, or science. At that time we 
had some twenty students in the school 
here who were members of the Masonic 
Order. We found on investigation that 
the membership of the Acacia Chapter at 
one of the nearby State Universities 
(with a total student enrollment of 2,- 
800) was 13 ; we, at present, have ^y 
members in a school with 250 students 
enrolled. 

''According to our constitution, the 
purpose of the order is 'the spread of the 
precepts of Freemasonry among Master 
Masons who are students in the profes- 
sional and denominational colleges, in- 
cluding as professional, schools of den- 
tistry, medicine, law and theology.' We 
have three other schools of dentistry or- 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



41 



g'anizing, and one denominational and 
one medical. 

"The government of the fraternity is 
vested in a Supreme Chapter, of which 
Dr. F. G. Hagenbuch, Eudora, Kansas, 
is S. W. iVi.; Dr. H. L. Blachly, 
Drumwright, Oklahoma, S. S. W. ; Dr. 
F. B. Misse, Highland, Kansas, Supreme 
Treasurer, and H. Morton Helzberg, 806 
Waldheim Bldg., Kansas City, Mo., Su-. 
preme Secretary. Extension work is 
being handled by the council of the local 
chapter, of which George Tinslar is W. 
M., L. D. Gray, S. W., R. C. Shaver, 
J. W. Vere Lane, Secretary and Hub- 
bard B. Whiting, Treasurer. 

"The emblem is a triangle formed by 
the Cabletow, with a knot in each corner, 
edged with twelve pearls, with a ruby at 
each corner of the triangle with the 
square and compasses on a red field, with 
the all-seeing eye in the center. 

''Each chapter must be absolutely self- 
supporting, as we will not allow any out- 
side financial assistance to be given 
them." — Quarterly Bitlletin, Iowa Ma- 
sonic Library, April, 1917. 



GET SOMEBODY ELSE. 

PAUL LAWRENCE DUNBAR. 

The Lord had a job for me, 

But I had so much to do 
I said: "You get somebody else 

Or wait till I get through." 
I don't know how the Lord came out, 

But He seemed to get along ; 
But I felt kind o' sneaking like — ■ , 

Knowed Fd done God wrong. 

One day I needed the Lord, 

Needed Him right away ; 
But He never answered me at all, ; 

And I could hear Him say 
Down in my accusing heart : 

"Nigger, Fse got too much to do. 
You get somebody else 

Or wait till I get through." 

Now, when the Lord He have a job 
for me, 

I never tries to shirk ; 
I drops what I have on hand 

And does the good Lord's work. 
And my afifairs can run along 

Or wait till I get through. 
Nobody else can do the work 

That God marked out for you. 



EFFECT OF THE LODGE ON NA- 
TIONAL LIFE. 

REV. E. A. CROOKS, NEW CASTLE, PA. 

"The lodge" is a collective name for 
numerous organizations of the same 
general character. Their common fea- 
ture is secrecy. Their ritual, their busi- 
ness, and to a considerable extent at 
least, the very purpose of these organ- 
izations are concealed from the un- 
intiated. Their inner purposes are 
guarded by oaths, or sacred promises. 
They exist ostensibly for a variety of 
purposes — fraternal, protective, benevo- 
lent, patriotic, political, reformatory, 
moral and religious. Their name is 
legion and their membership is reck- 
oned by millions. 

The Most Extensive and Intensive Rela- 
tionship. 

The term nation describes a very 
definite relationship of human beings. 
It is the most extensive relationship 
known to men. It brings into contact 
more individuals than any other form of 
association. It is also the most intensive 
relationship. It makes . demands of 
property, of service and of life made by 
no other association. It is brought into 
being in the providence of God who 
holds it to a strict account for its moral 
character. The government of a nation 
is a divinely instituted instrument for the 
administration of the authority dele- 
gated to it from God through Jesus 
Christ. 

This brief description of the lodge 
and this summary definition of the na- 
tion will give us our bearings in dis- 
cussing the efifect of the former on the 
latter. 

How Enjoy Democratic Institutions. 

The lodge affects the life of a nation 
injuriously because it is an undemocratic 
institution. Democracy is the ideal of 
all national life. It means equality in 
opportunity and privelege for every one. 
If it is to be realized there must not 
exist favored classes, enjoying special 
immunities and privileges. It matters 
not whether these specially favored 
classes exist by the act of sanction of 
the government, or whether they have 
sprung up as a part of the social fabric: 
thev are inimical to democracy. 

When we charge the lodge with being 
undemocratic we bring two counts 
against it. First it is undemocratic in its 







2E;_ -trr- 



Mn^ 



-ail ^ 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



. 43. 



tions logically they will be satisfied with 
a Christless political philosophy. A 
Christless lodge makes for a Christless 
nation. 

Weakens the Power of the Oath. 

The lodge is injurious to^ national life 
because it employs the oath in an un- 
justifiable way. The oath is the chief 
instrument of the state for securing in- 
tegrity on the part of its citizens. It is 
used universally to secure fidelity in 
office. Every step in courts of justice 
is safeguarded by the oath. The finan- 
cial soundness of our banks is vouched 
for by their officers under oath. The 
citizen makes a return of his property 
under oath. By his oath the soldier 
pledges his hfe to his country. Any- 
thing that w^eakens the force of this in- 
strument of public welfare is injurious 
to the national well-being. 

There are only two institutions that 
have a right to administer the oath, and 
they administer it publicly. The church 
uses it in her judicial processes and in 
declarations of her fidelity to her Lord. 
The church is a divinely commissioned 
agent of God. The state is the other or- 
ganization having a right to employ this 
conscience-binding instrument. A 1 1 
oaths adiministered by other agencies 
are extrajudicial. Private individuals 
and officers of voluntary organizations 
have no right to adiminister an oath. 
The oath is misused when it is admin- 
istered by an unauthorized person. It 
is misused when it is administered for 
private ends. It is misused when it is 
employed to bind one to conditions not 
plainly set before him. An oath in ad- 
vance to conceal secrets is unlawful. No 
one has a right to bind the conscience 
of another in this way. An oath is 
wrongly employed when used to invoke 
penalties on the swearer. The extra- 
judicial use of the oath by the lodge for 
the furtherance of its concealed aims 
and purposes is opposed to the high- 
est welfare of the state. Such use off 
the oath weakens its force and turns it 
aside from its original purpose. 

It Is a Power in Civil Affairs. 

The lodge affects injuriouslv the life 
of the nation because it interferes with 
the free exercise of its political func- 
tions. The assurance sometimes given 
the candidate that the obligations he is 



asked to assume will in no way inter- 
fere with the obligations he owes to his 
Ciod, his family or his country is a tacit 
admission that there is a danger lurking 
in secrecy to these vital interests. How- 
ever honest the assurance may be it can- 
not be a positive guarantee against such 
interference. Many, perhaps a major- 
ity, of secret societies in this country 
disclaim any political purpose. This 
does not guarantee that the influence of 
the lodge will not be brought to bear 
on the selection of public officials where 
the choice is between a member of the 
lodge and one who is not. It does not 
mean that there will be no favoritism in 
the courts of justice. 

Numerous secret societies have exist- 
ed and do exist in this country for po- 
litical purposes. The New International 
Encyclopedia, under the heading Secret 
Societies, Patriotic and Political, says : 
"Extended inquiry based on original and 
other data shows that a broad, if not a 
deep influence has been exerted over the 
political life of the U.^S. for 150 years 
by secret societies which form a chain 
extending practically from 1776 down 
to date." 

In the list that follows the above quo- 
tation are such societies as ''Sons of 
Liberty," ''Society of Red Men." later 
developing into the Improved Order of 
Red Men," "Know-Nothing," "Junior 
Order of American Mechanics," "An- 
cient Order of Hibernians," imported 
from Ireland, and the "American Pro- 
tective Association," the A. P. A. To 
this list should be added Knights of the 
Gold Circle, Ku-Klux Klan, Molhe 
Maguires. Night Riders ; numerous 
farmers' organizations, such as the 
Grange and the Farmers' Alliance : Black 
Hand societies among the Italians and 
Highbinders among the Chinese. Some 
of these have had laudable aims : others 
are recognized as enemies of the public 
good. However highminded any of 
them may be the method of secretism 
is markedlv out of harmonv wnth demo- 
cratic institutions. The Masonic order, 
which is in this country avowediv non- 
political, is a recognized political agent 
in France and other Latin speaking 
countries. During the third and fourth 
decades of the last centurv Masonry 
was a political issue in this country. 



44 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



Many men of enduring national fame, 
such as John Ouincy Adams, Thadeus 
Stevens, Charles Sumner and Daniel 
Webster, were pronouncedly opposed to 
it as the enemy of republicanism. Se- 
cret oath-bound associations of men are 
out of harmony with the genius of free 
institutions. 

Mormonism. 

The greatest danger that confronts 
the American nation to-day is from an 
organization of this character. As a di- 
recting force it binds together 3,000,000 
people. It controls more wealth than 
any financial institution in this, country. 
It exerts tremendous political influ- 
ence. It has its recognized representa- 
tives in the hahs of Congress, men who 
are the sworn enemies of the U. S. gov- 
ernment. This organization is the priest- 
hood of I^Iormonism, the oath of which 
is as follows: ''Therefore, we do 
covenant and promise, each and every 
one of us, that we will avenge the blood 
of the prophets on this nation, that 
we will teach the same to our children 
and our children's children unto the 
third generation, and that we will pray 
and never cease to pray Almighty God 
that he will guide the hand of the 
prophet against this nation." (Oath 
taken by Attorney Vernon J. Danielson 
in the Alormon Temple, Salt Lake City, 
Utah, in 191 1.) 

The penalties invoked for revealing 
the secrets of the Mormon Temple are 
very similar to those invoked on him- 
self by the Master Mason. Brigham 
Young was a Mason. It is also inter- 
esting to know that every Mormon of 
any consequence to-day is a Maspn. 
From its very nature secretism is inim- 
ical to the free institutions of repub- 
licanism. In practice it frequently 
proves a menace. 
Interferes with Administration of Justice. 

The Lodge affects the life of the na- 
tion injuriously because it interferes 
with the administration of justice. How 
generally this is true no one is able to 
say. The methods of procedure makes 
general detection impossible. Sufficient 
cases of actual, or would-be interfer- 
ence, come to light to make one wonder 
what are the actual facts. I shall not 
attempt to go into the evidence that has 
been accumulated on this point. In- 



stead I shall sight certain instances that 
have come to my personal knowledge. 
I have not been especially alert in this 
matter, nor have I had any opportunity, 
other than such as come to the average 
man, to note such occurrences. I relate 
them in substantiation of the possibili- 
ties of the interference of secretism with 
the administration of justice because 
they are incidental and commonplace. 

When I was a boy of about twelve 
years of age there occurred the murder 
of a man in a neighboring county. The 
two sons of the murdered man were 
tried, convicted and executed for the 
crime. The murdered man was pos- 
sessed of considerable means and was 
a man of influence in the community in 
which he lived. The mother sided with 
her sons in the trial. Naturally the oc- 
currence was much talked of in all the 
surrounding territory. One day I heard 
a group of men discussing the trial at 
the neighborhood blacksmith shop. One 
of them remarked incidentally that he 
understood that the Talbot boys were 
Masons. A neighbor who was a Mason 
replied, 'Tf they are they will never 
be hanged." Unwittingly he was de- 
claring what would have been his ver- 
dict had he been on the jury and the 
accused Masons. Would a Republican, 
a Democrat, a Presbyterian, or a Meth- 
odist have felt under a similar obliga- 
tion to a fellow politician or a co-relig- 
ionist? 

About twenty years ago a defaulting 
city treasurer was on trial in the city 
of Pittsburgh. At the time a young 
lady of my acquaintance was stenogra- 
pher for one of the leading attorneys 
of the city, a man who subsequently 
represented the U. S. government in 
the Bering Sea controversy with Great 
Britain. He was regarded as a man of 
honor and integrity. One day when the 
office force was talking about the prob- 
able conviction of the defaulting treas- 
urer the distinguished attorney broke 
into the conversation with ''1 hope he 
will be acquitted." In answer to the 
question ''Why"? he replied, "He be- 
longs to several lodges of which I am 
a member, and I hope he will be ac- 
quitted." The young: lady who report- 
ed the occurrence said, "But what if he 
is guilty?" To this the attorney replied 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



45 



that he did not care about that, but 
wanted to see his fellow lodge man ac- 
quitted. One cannot refrain from ask- 
ing what would have occurred if this 
attorney had been the judge before 
whom the defaulter was being tried, in- 
trusted with the instruction of the jury. 

During my residence in La Junta two 
negroes, father and son, were on trial 
for killing two police officers in a neigh- 
boring town. The son was charged with 
the killing and the father with being ac- 
cessory to it. At a certain point in his 
testimony the father was asked by the 
prosecuting attorney what he did then. 
He replied, "I threw up my hands and 
exclaimed, 'Lord, God, is there no help 
for the widow's son?'" In his address 
to the jury the prosecuting attorney said, 
referring to the old negro's testimony, 
''This is a pretty cute old negro. If any 
of you jurors are Masons you will prob- 
ably have noticed that he made use of a 
Masonic expression. (He did not quote 
the expression.) He probably belongs 
to some clandestine lodge." The old 
negro was wearing a Masonic badge. 
Two things may be fairly inferred from 
the incident. First, the old negro evi- 
dently indulged the hope of influencing 
the jury by advising them of the fact 
that he was a Mason. Second the pros- 
ecuting attorney considered it worth 
while to warn any Masonic members of 
the jury that they were not to take the 
accused lodge relationship into consid- 
eration, he being a member of a clan- 
destine lodge. As I Hstened to this I 
could not refrain from wondering what 
would have been the situation had the 
accused been a white Mason on trial 
before a jury on which there were Ma- 
sons. Had he made a similar appeal 
would the prosecuting attorney who was 
himself a Mason have called attention 
to it and warned the jury against be- 
ing influenced by it? 

These incidents are confessions that 
men are susceptible to lodge influences 
in the court room. These influences are 
not_ such as are exerted by the ordinary 
political, social or religious ties of life. 
Would men thus confess their bias if 
there is not something in the obligations 
of the lodge that binds them to this un- 
democratic discrimination ? 

An institution that is capable, accord- 



ing to confession of its members, of in- 
terfering with the administration of jus- 
tice is antagonistic to the welfare of a 
nation. Opposition to these institutions 
is a patriotic duty. 



ELK'S "LODGE OF SORROW." 

Frequently we hear from some lodge 
of our order inviting a stranger, a non- 
Elk, to give the address on Memorial 
Day, although experience again and again 
has made manifest that such an address 
is very seldom, no matter how gifted the 
orator, a success, that is, from an Elk 
point of view. As a rule such a speaker 
knows little or nothing about the fra- 
ternity, mere hear-say, knowledge ; and 
cannot possibly appreciate its whole- 
soul comradeship outside of its conviv- 
iality, or fully understand that its all 
abiding companionship and brotherly- 
love is founded upon certain ethical prin- 
ciples taught in its ritual of initiation, 
principles, it is true, as old as the human 
heart, yet, interpreted in a new way; and 
above all he is rarely in sympathy with 
its spirit of toleration, for- the average 
man is not broad enough to forget re- 
ligious, political and racial prejudices 
and antipathies; and scarcely is he ever 
willing to admit that Elk charity "is 
broader, its humanity deeper, its pur- 
poses nobler, its aims higher than those 
of any other social or fraternal organ- 
ization with which he is acquainted.'' 
Consequently, is it any wonder that his 
address has little or no value, often of- 
fends and generally has nothing to do 
with Elkdom? 

An Elk memorial service "does not evi- 
dence any particular system of faith or 
worship, its exercises have no religious 
signification." The word religion in its 
larger sense implies a love of God and 
ones own neighbor, and in that sense only 
are Elk memorial ceremonies devotional. 
To be an Elk, a man must believe in the 
existence of a Supreme Being, and in 
the immortality of the soul — here we 
draw the line, here we stop on the re- 
ligious highway. 

As Bro. Charles L. Jewett expressed 
it, "We leave the matter of religion and 
pious care of the soul to the church. \\'e 
remit the conduct of a man's private af- 
fairs and the question of his morals and 
his habits to himself, satisfied that these 



46 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



things must thus be conserved and cared 
for if at all. Wg require only an ac- 
knowledgment of the omnipotence and 
divinity of the Father, obedience to our 
laws, and substantial conformity to those 
regulations of society which are essential 
to the life and character of a gentle- 
man." 

In speaking of memorial services he 
said : "The members assemble not to 
bewail the fate of those wdio have fallen, 
but to witness their triumph in that they 
have risen ; not to regret the end of the 
race, but to gladly recall the manner in 
which it was rim." 

Elk Memorial Day Echoes. 

"\\'e represent a body of men who be- 
lieve in doing unto others what we would 
have them do unto us. We are men seek- 
ing the same end, possibly by divergent 
routes, but as a body standing shoulder 
to shoulder in the Fatherhood of God 
and the Brotherhood of Man. The prac- 
tical way to honor our dead is to model 
our lives after theirs." — P. G. E. R. Wil- 
liam J. O'Brien, Baltimore, Md., Lodge 
Xo. 7 — Scranton, Pa., Lodge No. 123. 

''Their fidelity, their discipline and 
patience are even more valuable qualities 
and more highly honored than when they 
w^ere on earth. Their honesty is still 
honesty; their fidelity is still passing as 
current coin ; their patience is still wait- 
ing upon God with his approval ; their 
faith, their hope, their love, and all their 
little nameless unremembered acts of 
kindness (and that is the best portion of 
any life) and whatever of them was 
precious will abide victoriously in that 
world to which God takes every trustful 
and loving child." — Rev. Louis Vanden 
Burg — Paterson, N. J., Lodge No. 60. 

"We have gathered, brethren, and good 
people all, to reverence those of our or- 
der who await our coming to the land 
of light. "^ '^ '-^'^ If we, as Elks, pro- 
tect those among us, should we none the 
less protect the memory of those who 
have passed behind the curtain into the 
Grand Lodge of eternity? Yea, and be- 
fore those names the tear mist rises and 
in calling them the voice is caught and 
held, and to keep those names in re- 
membrance we hold this, our sacred 
tryst." — Rev. Wyatt Brown — Asheville, 
N. C., Lodge No. 608. 



"Oh, yes, my friends, there are many 
lessons which we may draw from the 
example of these our departed brothers, 
and may we ourselves so live that when 
we shall reach the valley of the shadow 
and when we shall cross the dark river, 
we may hear the welcome of well-known 
voices and feel the clap, warm and ten- 
der, of well-known hands ready to take 
us and lead us as brothers through the 
eternal mystery." — Bro. Overton G. 
Ellis — Tacoma, Wash., Lodge No. 174. 

"In no sense are the principles of this 
order used or urged as a substitute for 
religious faith and yet, in large degree, 
they embody or crystallize the best ethi- 
cal elements in all religions and in all 
philosophies. Charity, justice, fidelity 
and brotherly love spell fraternity and 
the fraternal spirit is the great ideal 
which men and nations have been striv- 
ing to attain or acquire since the begin- 
ning of civilization." — Frank H. Matt, 
D.D., E.R., N.Y., West Jamestown, N. 
Y., Lodge No. 263 — Raleigh, N. C., 
Lodge No. 735. — The Elks-Antler, Jan- 
uary, 1917. 



A "HIGH FROLIC." 

Any Mason who has received the de- 
grees of Royal, Select and Super-Excel- 
lent Master Mason in the Council, par- 
ticularly the latter, according to the beau- 
tiful ritual of these last few years, must 
feel greatly mortified that a view of them 
could be taken by the writer of a news 
item in a Detroit newspaper, if he is a 
Council Mason. It is no wonder that 
some Grand Lodges are taking steps to 
prohibit the publication of any news of 
lodge activities. It was said : 

"Detroit Masons and companions from 
throughout the state joined in high frolic 
at the Masonic Temple Saturday after- 
noon and evening. The occasion was 
the exemplification of three degrees of 
the order, the Royal and Select Master 
degrees in the afternoon, and the Super- 
Excellent degree in the evening. 

"The affair was given under the direc- 
tion of Monroe Council, which has been 
in existence sixty-six years. The pro- 
duction of the symbolic shows cost more 
than $2,000. Seven hundred persons d.t- 
tended.^'— Masonic Home Journal, Jan. 
I, 1917. 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



47 



MARTIN LUTHER. 

Luther was in the very highest sense 
of the word a hero. No man ever en- 
tered the Hsts of mortal combat against 
more fearful odds. No man was ever 
so left to depend under God on his own 
single judgment and personal courage. 
The leading acts of his life startled and 
alarmed alike his friends and his foes. 
When he nailed his ninety-five theses to 
the door of the church at Wittenburg, 
not one of his most intimate friends was 
made aware of his intentions, and all 
stood aghast at his audacity. When he 
burned the papal bull and excommuni- 
cated the Pope and denounced the hier- 
archy of Rome as the Antichrist, the 
world raised its hands in holy horror, 
and his nearest friends trembled at the 
temerity of the fearless monk. And 
when at the Diet of \Vorms he stood 
alone before the Emperor Charles V., 
whose kingdom extended across both 
liemispheres ; his brother, the Archduke 
Ferdinand and six electors of the Em- 
pire ; twenty- four dukes, among them 
many whose names excite horror in our 
minds wdien we recall their bloody 
deeds ; eight margraves ; thirty archbish- 
ops, bishops and prelates, seven ambas- 
sadors, incluciing those of France and 
England ; deputies, princes, counts and 
barons and the Pope's nuncio — two hun- 
dred magnates, the highest dignitaries of 
Europe — when Martin Luther, warned 
at every step of his danger, resolutely 
marched to Worms ; entered that Diet ; 
humbly, calmly but firmly acknowledged 
his writings ; reverently declared his be- 
lief of their truth and his refusal to re- 
tract ; and pronounced his solemn warn- 
ing to the Emperor and his council to 
beware lest they be found fighting 
against God, we have before us the 
grandest spectacle of moral heroism of 
modern times. For moral grandeur and 
sublimity it approaches nearest to that 
incomparable glory of the God Man in 
meeting the wrath of heaven, earth and 
hell for the redemption of our race. 
Luther w^as not dragged in chains before 
that tribunal ; bonds stronger than iron 
chains held him ; the love of Christ con- 
strained him : the glory of God and the 
salvation of souls were at stake, and 
his faith did not falter, "l neither can nor 



will retract. I stand here and can say 
no more. God help me. Amen.'' 

That heroic act of the intrepid monk 
struck terror to the hearts of his many 
and -mighty foes. Pallid with mingled 
fear and wrath they looked at each other 
in mute astonishment and realized their 
ignoble defeat. 

The news of this daring and success- 
ful stroke spread through the world and 
like an electric spark awoke the nations 
from the lethargy of ages, kindled a 
gleam of hope in the breasts of the en- 
slaved millions, and made tyrants trem- 
ble on their thrones. A. M. M. 



GRANGE SECRECY. 

[An Open Letter.] 
Degolia, Pa., Jan. 8, 1917. 
Mr. Mortimer Whitehead, 

Compton, Cal., R. R. 2. 
Dear Sir:— 

Y^our circular, "Secrecy in the Order 
— The Grange,' " presumably a reply, or 
perhaps only an acknowledgment of my 
note to you of the 14th ultimo, is very 
disappointing. The old sophistical stock 
arguments are musty with age ; the 
''Come into my parlor, said the spider 
to the fly'' coaxing ; a trap set for the 
unwary, and to fool the unthinking. 

The circular refers to the "Good 
Book." It -is hard to understand what 
other use the Grange has for the Bible, 
than for a blind for simple souls. "Its 
(the Grange) teachings are the loftiest 
that man can seek." Its patron goddess 
is that filthy goddess of the Eleusynian 
mysteries; see Ephesians V; 6-13. "Can 
tw^o w-alk together, except they be 
agreed?" Jesus Christ and Ceres, the 
concubine of Zeus-the-sun are not in 
agreement, hence do not associate. The 
"Grange" ritual provides for its dead to 
be taken to — (we are presumed to sup- 
pose Heaven) because all dues have been 
faithfully paid, and the secret, fore- 
sworn oath (see Levi. A'; 4-5) is unvio- 
lated. The Christian's necessary atone- 
ment for sin, Jesus Christ, is deliberately 
repudiated, but the Christian's Bible fills 
its lodgely place as lodge furniture only ! 
No. sir, I do not forget that the congre- 
gation at the grave's mouth is dismissed 
with the Christian dismissal for effect. 
A society born of selfishness, its mem- 
bers foresworn to selfishness, trying to 



48 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



Tune. 1917. 



prove its charity because of the presence 
of the Bible on Ceres' altar, is too far- 
fetched : it has no part in the economy of 
the Lord Jesus Christ. Ceres knew, and 
knows no charity. She and "Therefore 
all things whatsoever ye would that men 
should do to you, do ye even so to them," 
have nothing in common : they are as far 
apart as East is from \\'est ; the dis- 
tance is unbounded. 

Your circular questions, "\Miere would 
our Christian religion have been if it had 
not been a thousand times more secret 
than the Grange?" Then it speaks of 
Xero's persecutions and the persecutions 
of the Scotch Covenanters. The "thou- 
sand times" is open to question : but if 
the cases do parallel, it would be inter- 
esting to be informed what martyrdom 
the "Grange" oath is to ward off ; per- 
haps its terror is as great a wretch as 
Xero? The methods of the early Chris- 
tians to preserve their lives and the reli- 
gion they held most dear : or the methods 
of the Scotch Covenanters to outwit 
their persecutors, and to keep alive that 
religion : these are the bulwark of all 
liberties needing no defense. A secret 
system that resorts to the subterfuge of 
attempting to put itself on a level with 
self-sacrificing Christians is beneath con- 
tempt. Pledged assistance and help paid 
for in advance is not the spirit of the 
Good Samaritan (stolen and hypocritical- 
ly used by secret societies to hide selfish- 
ness), he who aided Jiis enemy in dis- 
tress ; not a man bound to him by lodge 
ties, and whose dues were surely paid to 
date, and sworn to him against all com- 
ers. I have no desire to be sarcastic, 
disrespectful in my language nor un- 
charitable in my feelings : but, sir, I must 
positively assert, without fear of suc- 
cessful contradiction, that the eilort of 
the tract. is to catch the unwary. 

Apropos the paragraph speaking of 
"the grand people who have made your 
state — the Quakers or Friends." etc.. I 
now quote to you from a tract issued by 
''The Tract Association of Friends:"" — 
"That men should organize secret socie- 
ties for evil objects can be readily un- 
derstood ; but why good objects — charity, 
temperance, or the reformation of evil 
doers — should recjuire the cover of a se- 
cret organization is not so clear to many 
minds. Such a societv. in the hands of 



evil and designing men may readily be- 
come a powerful agency for the accom- 
plishment of the basest of purposes. 
However good the avowed object of 
such society may be, it might easily be 
perverted, so that its very existence 
arouses mistrust among fellow-citizens, 
and becomes a menace to the liberties and 
rights of all \\ho are not members." 

The paragraph concerning the family 
is an insult to all decent families. J 
challenge proof of the assertion, with its 
insinuation, that any family except it be 
oathbound to itself, is a secret society. 
A family oathbound against every other 
family outside its doors would smell very 
strongly of criminal instincts and need 
very close watching. That a family is a 
secret society was worn threadbare 
many years ago : and. sir, it is not con- 
ceivable that it is advanced now in good 
faith. Such a suggestion is an insult to 
our fathers and to the mothers that bore 
us. I again quote from the Friends' 
tract: '''We should carefully discriminate 
between that voluntary privacy which 
belongs to the family, and many other 
proper relationships of life, and that 
enforced secrecy which properly belongs 
to evil doers to cover up their evil deeds. 
The family is not a secret society : the 
home of the family is private, not secret. 
The individual firm and corporation 
doing a legitimate business may choose 
to keep their aftairs private : but if their 
business methods are honest, they will 
not be guarded by an oath of secrecy 
from their employes. The business meet- 
ings of religious societies are often se- 
lect, only members being expected to at- 
tend them. If each member were re- 
quired to make a solemn promise ever 
to conceal and never to reveal any busi- 
ness transacted, then might such a so- 
cietv be called a secret society." 

Thousands of Grangers are known, 
outside the lodge, to be honest people: 
their live? and dealing- are above re- 
proach : but in the sacredness ( ?) of 
the Grange precints, "it is necessary that 
vou give us a solemn pledge" to obey 
irresponsible superiors, and unknown 
laws, enacted and which mav be enacted : 
free born but lodge enslaved. 

Except for clandestine assistance. I 
sug^gest that farmers can get as good re- 
sults in open farmers' clubs as in the 



Tunc. 1917 



CHRISTIAN' CYNOSURE 



secret Grange : and without being com- 
promised as citizens, or Christians. Re- 
spectfully submitted. 

J. C. Young. 
— Christian Consenotor, Jan. 31, 1917. 



GLIMPSES OF THE SECRET WORLD. 

BY MZ.\D A. KELSEV. RICHMOND. IND. 

Things are coming to Hght all of the 
time that reveal the true inwardness of 
the secret lodge system. A woman writ- 
ing in the Indianapolis A'rzior and signing 
herself "A Lodge Man's Wife." tells 
some ver\' startling things. She does not 
regard the lodges as essentially bad. but 
rather put to bad uses. She says : 

■"Lodges have done a great deal of good in 
the land, but the late hours which they keep 
have offered opportunin- for a great deal of 
harm. It is not kno\\Ti at large that lodge 
rooms are being a den for sports. * * * It is 
verv- common now for fast women to saunter 
past the lodge headquarters, watching and 
waiting for their prey. And it is loiown. 
without a doubt, that men. not in small num- 
bers, but large numbers, go to the lodge, not 
for die good tliey may do their fellowmen. 
but to be able to meet these women without 
being called in question by wives and friends. 
* * * It would surprise people to know how 
many broken-hearted wives are in the city 
of Indianapohs. all because their companions 
have chosen the lodge room in preference to 
the home."' 

A somewhat prominent lawyer, who 
was also a Mason but not a Christian, 
said to President Blanchard: *The 
trouble is not with what happens in the 
lodge but with that which comes after." 
Then he went on to tell how tliat in al- 
most even,- lodge there would be found 
one or two moral lepers whose delight it 
was to invite innocent young men to go 
with them after lodge to the house of 
the strange woman. And he said that 
he had seen young man after young man 
go down in this way like lead in the 
water. And yet we are told in the face 
of all this that it is not best to say any- 
tliing about it. But who says so? And 
I press that question — Who? Our God 
says. '"CrA- alotid and spare not." There 
are really but two voices in the world 
to-day and we must choose which we 
will obey. 

Of course. Zi-e do not admit that there 
is no evil in the lodge itself, for we know 
that there is one evil that is ever present 
— being the practical denial of our Lord 
and blaster. We know this not onlv 



from their lodge rituals, but from the 
admissions of those who practice the 
secret arts. An intelligent Odd-Fellow 
who knew full well that it was contrary 
to the rules of their order to otTer prayer 
in the name of Christ, told me that he 
met that difticulty by praying in the name 
of the Father, the Messiah and the Holy 
Ghost. And he found that the use of 
the tenii Messiah pleased the Jews who 
would not tolerate the name of Jesus 
Christ. \\'ell. we may fool ourselves and 
we may fool men. but we cannot fool 
God. At die laying of a cornerstone of 
a Masonic temple in Indianapolis a year 
ago last summer the benediction was 
pronounced in the name of the Father 
and the Holy Ghost, the omission being 
made doubtlessly out of deference to 
those who were unbelievers in the Xame. 
A minister witli whom I talked in an 
Illinois tOAxii admitted this practice and 
defended it stoudy. "This is diat spirit 
of anti-Christ whereof ye have heard 
that it should come, and even now is it 
already in the world." \Mien will the 
Church arise and separate herself from 
the unclean thing? — T/ic Frjctid's Miu- 



LABOR LODGE LEADERS ON 
LIQUOR. 

[Exiracrs from The Ann-Prohirirlon Man- 
ual," 1917. published by the National \Miole- 
sale Liquor Dealers' Assoc:a:ic:: o: Amer- 
ica.] 

Prohibition Wrong, Says Darrow. 

"Clarence Darrow. the labor attorney 
of national note, has frequently taken 
the stump against Prohibition. On one 
occasion he gave utterance to the fol- 
lowing : 

" 'Xow there is one rule of life. It 
you give men opporttmity. give them 
food and clothing and drink and sunlight 
and homes, they can look after their own 
morals, and they cannot do it any other 
way. The whole theory of Prohibition 
is wrone.' 



Gompers on Prohibition. 

"Satiiuel Gompers. president oi the 
American Federation of Labor, in a tele- 
gram to Peter Schaetfer. president of the 
Trades Union League of Dtiluth. Minn., 
thus gives his position on Prohibition : 

" 'Replying to your request for an ex- 
pression of an opinion on the subject of 



50 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



prohibition, beg to say, as a result of 
my travels in several countries, my ob- 
servation and study of prohibition by 
law of the liquor business, is not a bless- 
ing, as its advocates declare, but a curse. 
Prohibition has not, and does not, make 
men abstainers or even temperate, but 
in addition to increasing intemperance, 
makes men, otherwise law-abiding, law- 
breakers. There is no power more po- 
tent to make men temperate, not only 
in drinking, but in all things of life, than 
the organized labor movement, which 
secures for the workers the shorter work 
day, higher wages, better w^orking con- 
ditions and better surroundings in their 
homes. The liquor business requires 
just and fair regulation — prohibition is 
unfair, unjust and makes for unfreedom 
and is anti-Americanism.' 



Labor Opposes Prohibition. 

''Realizing the failure of Prohibition 
as an aid to real temperance, and con- 
scious that dry legislation is a detriment 
to the worker, throwing hundreds and 
thousands out of employment, labor or- 
ganizations in all parts of the country 
have repeatedly gone on record as op- 
posed, in any such laws. Their journals 
have consistently fought this propa- 
ganda, and their leaders have openly ar- 
raigned themselves on the wet side of 
the controversy. 

''A few of the Labor Unions which 
have within the past year passed resolu- 
tions condemning Prohibition, are : 

''The Pennsylvania State Federation 
of Labor. 

"The New Jersey Council of United 
Brotherhood Carpenters and Joiners. 

"Convention of Labor Editors at St. 
Louis. 

"^lontana State Federation of Labor. 

"San Francisco Labor Council. 

"American Federation of Musicians. 

"Detroit Federation of Labor. 

"^lassachusetts State Federation of 
Labor. 

"Michigan State Federation of Labor. 

"Building Trades Council and Unions 
of California. 

"Baltimore Federation of Labor. 

"The resolution adopted by the Balti- 
more Federation of Labor was also en- 
dorsed by the building trades, steam fit- 
ters and helpers, cigarmakers, granite 



cutters, hoisting portable engineers, 
boiler makers and iron ship builders, 
bottlers, cap, cork and stopper workers, 
sheet metal workers, paper hangers and 
decorators, structural iron workers, 
painters, clothing cutters, tinners and 
plumbers of Baltimore." 



All reforms that are either genuine or 
perament are the outgrowth of Chris- 
tianity, said Rev. Dr. J. R. W. Sloane : 
even those which apparently have but 
slight 'connection with religion, such as 
sanitary, political, educational, labor 
reforms, etc., draw their inspiration 
either directly or indirectly from this 
source. Society has made no progress 
during all these eighteen hundred and 
more years except as moved by this im- 
pulse, as breathed upon by this wind 
from heaven. Those movements which 
are specially designated "moral re- 
forms" are simply bringing out into new 
light, emphasizing and making practical 
and effective some Scriptural principle, 
the leaven affecting a portion of the 
mass which has not heretofore felt its 
operation. 

The world has been resounding these 
few months past with the name and 
fame of Martin Luther ; but who was 
Luther? A follower of "Him who be- 
ing the holiest among the miehty, and 
the mightiest among the holy, lifted with 
his pierced hand empires off their hinges, 
and turned the stream of centuries out 
of its channel and still governs the 
ages." What was the Reformation of 
the sixteenth century? A mighty move- 
ment toward primitive Christianity ; first 
of all, religious: secondarily, as religion 
and politics will always be found hand- 
in-hand, political. 



John Milton said, "Reformers look 
small in the eyes of the world, they are 
so far in advance, but large in the eves 
of God, they are so much nearer him ; 
for all real reform is Godward." 



Zions Watchman is a "full salva- 
tion," "separate from the world." un- 
denominational, non-sectarian religious 
weekly paper. Write for free sample 
copy. Address L. H. Higley, Publisher, 
Butler, Ind. 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



l^t 



51 



Family Affairs of the Gompers. 

Clipped from the Daily Press. 



Bomb in Flat Building. 

Chicago, May 3. — An apartment building of 
56 flats at 115t) East Sixty-second street was 
slightly damaged by a bomb explosion last 
night. It is l)elieve(l the l^omb was placed as 
a result of the janitors' war. It shattered 
seven windows, causing a loss of $25. A non- 
union janitor, it is said, is employed. 

Garment Workers' Strike Called Off. 

Chicago, April 24. — Discouraged because of 
the upholding of an antipicketing injunction 
against them by Judge Baldwin, and his ac- 
tion in sentencing a number of them to jail 
for violations of it, members of the Interna- 
tional Ladies' Garment Workers' Union called 
off their strike yesterday. 

Wage Increase to Miners. 

Philadelphia, Pa., April 30. — Concessions 
which will mean an increase of more than 
$26,000,000 a year in wages were granted to- 
night to the 55,000 mine workers in the bitu- 
minous tields of central Pennsylvania by a 
committee of operators who had been in con- 
ference with representatives of the men for 
more than a week. The advance in wages for 
all classes of labor ranges between 20 and 
30 per cent. 

Nonunion Diesetters in Can Factory. 

Chicago, May 18. — Nonunion diesetters were 
placed at work yesterday in the plants of the 
American Can Company, to replace union die- 
setters who went on strike, together with 800 
machinists. Girls employed in the can com- 
pany's factories received a 10 per cent increase 
in wages. 

End of Bakers' Strike. 

Chicago, May 2. — The strike of the bakers 
is likely to be settled wathin a few days. Un- 
official overtures from some of the union lead- 
ers were met yesterday, unofficially, with 
sympathetic interest by the committee of 
bakery owners. 

Plainly the differences between the two par- 
ties have dwindled to a point where it needs 
only the forceful action of someone in author- 
ity to bring them together. 

The employers are beginning to see that 
public opinion will not be likely to support 
them in inflicting suffering or even serious 
inconvenience on a large part of the popula- 
tion over such a comparatively unimportant 
matter. 

The bakers, now that their demand for an 
increase in wages has been granted, are also 
feeling that to hold out in their position of 
refusing to compromise on other matters may 
reflect against them. 

The fact that the country is at war and that 
any prolonged strike is likely to result in 
dractic action by the national government is 
also having its effect. 

Street Car Strike Threatened. 

Chicago, May 9. — Chicago again is confront- 
ed with a transportation employes' contro- 



versy, with another strike on all the elevated 
■and surface lines as a possibility in the back- 
ground. 

The chief demands of both the elevated and 
surface lines car men are for higher wages — 
amounting to an increase of aljout 40 per cent 
— ^and shorter liours, to go into effect on June 
1, at the expiration of the present agreement. 
This was formulated as the result of the strike 
two years ago 'and has been in effect since 
that time. 

The chief clauses in the new agreements 
the company officials will l)e asked to sign are 
as follows : 

Wages — Increase of from 36 cents to 45 
cents an hour during the first year of the 
agreement, and from 45 to 50 cents during the 
second year. At the present time the mini- 
mum wage is 27 cents, and the maximum 36 
cents, on the basis of a four year scale. 

Hours— To be on a basic eight hour day 
with a nine hour maximum. Under the pres- 
ent agreement the men work under a basic 
ten hour day. Night car runs not to exceed 
six hours, and the men operating on them to 
receive $3.50 a run. "In case the company op- 
erates any runs of less than eight hours," 
reads one clause, "the company shall pay eight 
hours' time therefor." This also applies to 
extra trips. 

Overtime — Those on runs necessitating work 
over eight hours to be paid time and one-half 
for overtime. 

Movie Unions in Dynamite Outrages. 

Chicago, May 9.— City-wide dynamiting of 
moving picture theaters and apartment build- 
ings by a ring of labor unionists, who are said 
to have extorted money from nearly all of the 
large theater owners and many building con- 
tractors in Chicago, has been revealed in all 
its details by Assistant State's Attornev Nich- 
olas Michaels. 

Perhaps the largest "shakedown," evidence 
of which is in the hands of the state's attornev, 
is said to be that of Albert Fuchs, proprietor 
of the Chateau Theater, Broadwav and Grace 
streets, who, reports have it, paid $30,000 when 
the alleged extortionists demanded that sum 
or a higher one on the threat that his theater 
would be blown up. 

Fuchs is said to have yielded to this kind of 
extortion and to have paid the monev. The 
blackmailers are then said to have demanded 
$3,000 more. Fuchs, then went to the state's 
attorney's office with his son and made a state- 
ment. Hearing of this, the extortionists dam- 
aged his theater with a bomb. It was said 
yesterday that had not a mistake been made 
the theater would have been wrecked. 

The reign of blackmailing, vandalism, dyna- 
miting and even shooting, which saw their 
climax in a feud between the two rival organ- 
izations, locals 157 and 110, was described 
yesterday by a man high in authoritv. 

Previous to 1914. Local 110. the rank and 
file of whose members are and alwavs have 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



been above suspicion, had certain members of 
influence who started a blackmail campaign on 
movie owners, he said. In 1914 Local 157 
was formed at the instigation of the electrical 
workers, and the organization was builded 
from the eunmen and sluggers in the ranks of 
Local nor 

Macaroni Workers Strike. 

Chicago, ^Ma}- 8. — One hundred and seventy- 
five macaroni workers, members of the Chi- 
cago ^Macaroni Union, declared a strike yes- 
terday against ten macaroni manufacturers. 
The strikers demand higher wages. They 
have been receiving 30 cent's an hour for a 
ten and twelve hour day. 

Chicago Labor Decides to Support the Gov- 
ernment. 

Chicago, May 21. — After a bitter fight, con- 
suming the most dramatic session it has held 
in years, the Chicago Federation of Labor 
yesterda}- determined the position that organ- 
ized labor of the city is to take with regard 
to the war. 

The question was brought before the dele- 
gates in the form of a report by the executive 
committee, recommending that the position of 
the national labor executives be adopted as 
that of the local body. 

For hours before its passage a number of 
the delegates hurled fiery denunciations at a 
proposal that the federation indorse the stand 
taken by the heads of the national labor or- 
ganizations at a meeting held in Washington 
on March 12th when they pledged themselves 
on behalf of organized labor of the country 
to ''defend, safeguard and preserve the re- 
public of the United States of America." They 
declared the stand taken at the Washington 
conference to be a misrepresentation of the 
beliefs of the rank and file of labor, and that 
labor, if it ever goes to war, should fight for 
itself and not for the country. 

But just in the middle of the attack, at a 
time when the delegates were shouting that a 
vote be taken and defeat of the proposal 
seemed certain, a Mark Antony for the occa- 
sion arose in the person of Victor A. Olander, 
secretary of the Illinois Federation of Labor. 

"Stop and think what you are about to do," 
he said. 

"The question that is before 3-ou now is the 
most important that has ever come before this 
body. It affects the future of organized labor 
in Chicago more vitalh^ than an3^thing you 
have ever had to decide. Can you afford to 
decide it in the mood you are now in? 

'T have no SA^mpathies one way or the other 
with any of the foreign nations involved in 
this war. I believe that labor should go to 
almost any length to avoid war and its hor- 
rors. But this country is now facing, not the 
possibilit\- of war, but war itself — and this is 
my country. I'm an American and I intend to 
do what I can to safeguard Amicrica as T 
would my own family. 

'■'For, after all, this country is but an ex- 
tension of our families. True, there are a 
number of black sheep in it, but this is my 
home and these are my people, and by them 
and for them I stand." 



When a rising vote was called for, 144 dele- 
gates stood for the measure's passage and 59 
against it. 

Would Demand Irish Freedom. 

Chicago, May 7. — A debate over whether 
the United States should demand that Great 
Britain "grant to the Irish nation full and 
complete independence, with the right to form 
an Irish republic," occupied part of the time 
of the Chicago Federation of Labor's meeting- 
yesterday. 

It was finally decided that a resolution fa- 
voring the question be adopted, and that 
copies of it be sent to President Wilson. 

Gompers Warns Russian Labor. 

Washington, D. C, May 7. — The seriousness 
of the Russian situation was emphasized to- 
da}-, when, with the sanction of the govern- 
ment authorities, Samuel Gompers, president 
of the American Federation of Labor, ad- 
dressed an emphatic appeal to the executive 
council of workmen and soldiers' deputies at 
Petrograd. 

In the name of American labor, Mr. Gom- 
pers urges the Russian workmen to stand firm 
against the plottings of the central powers for 
an abortive peace. He warns the Petrograd 
labor leaders to beware of the eft'orts to bring 
about a settlement of the conflict between 
Russia and Germany favorable to the contin- 
uation of Prussian miltarism. 

]\Ir. Gompers also expresses complete con- 
fidence in the purposes and opinions of the 
American war mission soon to go to Russia. 
He denounces as criminal and pro-German 
any suggestion that the members will seek to 
interfere in Russian's internal affairs or will 
give any advice except with the purpose of 
combating the common enemy. 

Labor Would Cripple the Courts. 

Two bills whose passage by the Illinois legis- 
lature would have exceedingly grave conse- 
quences in their effects on good government in 
Chicago are to come up for a final vote in the 
House on Wednesday. They are the anti- 
injunction bill and the contempt case trial bill. 
The first named measure is intended practi- 
cally to prohibit court injunctions in labor 
disputes and the second provides trials by 
jury in cases of contempt of court for viola- 
tion of court injunctions. The first bill pre- 
vents interference with picketing, sympa- 
thetic strikes and boATotts ; the second takes 
from state courts the power to enforce com- 
pliance with their orders and requires judg- 
ment to be passed by juries in contempt cases 
instead of by the courts. 

Tht rights of the people of Illinois are not 
imperiled by their judges. Rather are they 
imperiled by acts of intimidation or violence 
which just and fearless judges are required 
to condemn under existing law. To make 
contempt of court a safe and profitable pastime 
by depriving judges of their power to enforce 
their own orders would be a lamentable de- 
parture from wise policy. 

It is fairly certain that the contempt case 
trial bill if made into law would practically 



Tune, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



nullify injunctions against the illegal sale of 
liquor and against disorderly houses. 

Both bills are dangerous and unnecessary. 
Thev ought to be defeated. — Editorial, Chicago 
Daily Xeu^s, May 15, 1917. 

[Both bills, against which the yeu:s pro- 
tests, failed to pass when put to vote. — Ed.] 
Rebuke to Teachers' Union. 

Chicago, May 1. — Jacob M. Loeb's reap- 
pointment as a member of the board of edu- 
cation was confirmed yesterday afternoon by 
the cit\- council. The vote was 42 to 24, re- 
corded after a series of verbal attacks on 
President Loeb's administration by Socialist 
members and other allies of the Teachers' 
Federation. 

At the same time the council conlirmed the 
reappointment of Mrs. Frances E. Thornton 
to the board. 

Both appointments are for the new nve-year 
terms provided by the Otis-Mueller law. There 
are to be eleven members of the school board 
under this new law, the number being cut from 
twent}--one. 

The big ma:orit>- by which President Loeb 
won, after a continuous nght waged by Mar- 
garet Hale\- and her allies, was regarded the 
severest rebuke yet administered to the Teach- 
ers" Federation's attempt at union labor con- 
trol of the schools. 

It was the general verdict that the issue of 
school government determined the battle. It 
was accepted that the council by a large ma- 
jority approved the policies of Mr. Loeb. 

Teachers Quit Labor Unions. 

Chicago, May 21. — The Chicago Teachers' 
Federation, one of the chief storm centers in 
the school system of the cit\- for nearly two 
decades, severed its connection yesterday with 
organized labor. 

*Tn view of the cit}- council's action in re- 
appointing Jacob Loeb as head of the schools, 
and because of the Supreme Court's action in 
sustaining the Loeb rule, it is the only thing 
that can be done," explained John Fitzpatrick. 
president of the Labor Federation. "With- 
drawal from the union labor movement is the 
only way that the teachers' organization can 
remain intact. They have a chance to stay 
together in that way, and the principles of 
unionism will remain imbedded in them." 

Mr. Fitzpatrick then presented a report rec- 
ommending the withdrawal. By action of the 
delegates in 'concurring in the report the 
teachers' organization became a thing of the 
past. 

Six reasons were given by Mr. Fitzpatrick 
in his report for recommending the with- 
drawal. They were : 

1. Because of the Loeb rule, orohibiting 
membership by teachers in labor unions. 

2. Because the Supreme Court of Illinois 
reversed the opinion of the Superior and Ap- 
pellate Courts of Cook Count>- and ordered 
the injunction dissolved which had restrained 
the board of education from enforcing the 
Loeb rule. 

3. Because, while the teachers" federation 
was testing the validitv* of this rule in the 
courts, Loeb dropped from the service 38 effi- 



cient teachers who were officers and members 
of the federation, all of whom were recom- 
mended for re-election by the superintendent 
of schools. 

4. Because the city council, by a vote of 42 
to 24, confirmed the reappointment of Loeb. 

5. Because all of the 3S teachers dropped 
are still out of their positions and the board 
threatens to drop more teachers. 

6. Because the Supreme Court has held that 
boards of education in Illinois have the abso- 
lute right to refuse to employ as teachers any 
one who is, or is not, a member of a labor 
union. 



FRATERNITY SCHOLARSHIP. 
\\'orce5ter Pohtechnic Institute is one 
of the important educational institutions 
devoted to science and technical skill. It 
is located in the same city with Clark 
L'niversity. although independent of that 
or any other educational tDundation. 
Scientific tests and methods of a strict 
and reliable sort would naturally be ex- 
pected to make any self-examination the 
basis of a reliable report. The annual 
report of its president for the year 1916 
contains facts and figures justifying that 
expectation, and these include some that 
pertain to the relation of Greek letter so- 
cieties to scientific and technical scholar- 
ship. The Institute having received 
many inquiries about the eltect of frater- 
nit}' membership, a member of the fac- 
ult}- took pains to lay out a table of av- 
erages for all students of the Institute, 
which disclosed the difi'erence between 
fraternit}- members and other students, 
making obvious the superior success of 
those who did not join secret societies. 
They are found to do better work in 
classrooms and laboratories. The table 
was prepared at the request of students, 
who are said to have had no purpose of 
comparing between societies ; but the re- 
ported results do actually reveal some 
difference between them. Our own read- 
ers, however, will be chiefly interested in 
a more general comparison. This may 
be stated as follows : Average scholar- 
ship of students who are not Greek let- 
ter men, 71.4. (Seventy- one and four- 
tenths.) Average scholarship of those 
who are such, 69.1. Lowest average of 
any society, 67.6. 



It isn't enough to beat the fruit from 
an evil tree. It should be cut down or 
dug out by the roots. 



54 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



3lol|n(f mnrg Aiama — i^txtJiPrfatJiptttlmtf Ji i^tat^a 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literar}- or a historic standpoint.] 

Ouincy, 19 August, 1832. 
\\'iLLiAM L. Stone, Esq. 

Dear Sir : ■ 

(Concluded) 

There is a lingering attachment 
to the institution, as it had been 
in better days, — like the affection of a 
parent discovering in bitterness of 
soul the profligacy of a favorite child, — 
which adds a double seal of confirma- 
tion to the disclosures which you have 
had the intrepidity to make and to sus- 
tain. There are many things in the vol- 
ume which I do not see as you do ; but 
the sincerity of your own conviction of 
the truth of all that you affirm is appar- 
ent in every page. I speak of the in- 
trepidity of your disclosures, because I 
have not dissembled to myself the pe- 
culiar position in which you stand to- 
ward the institution, both as a man and 
as a member of a responsible profes- 
sion. I see you as neither an adhering 
nor a seceding Mason. I think I per- 
ceive the conflict in your own mind be- 
tween the obligation of Masonry which 
you had taken upon you and the duties 
of your profession as the editor of a 
public journal — duties to a community 
at large, which you had resolved never 
to compromise or to betray. I think 1 
see that when you took the oaths of 
the Entered Apprentice, the Master 
Mason, the Royal Arch, and the 
Knig-hts Templars, you little imagined 
the temptations, the trials, and the dan- 
gers into w^hich they were to lead you 
by their conflict with your duties as a 
man, a Christian, and a citizen. You 
seem scarcely to be aware even now 
that the trials through which you are 
passing originated there. You are un- 
willing to acknowledge it to yourself. 
But the trials are around you. You 
have betrayed no Masonic secret. You 
have forfeited no obligations of your 
own. But you have justly concluded 



that of what had been divulged by 
others it would be absurd to make 
longer a secret, and dishonest to deny 
it as false. Yet you are in the midst 
of brother Masons, — men whom you 
respect and esteem, who still hold them- 
selves bound by the ties which you con- 
sider as dissolved, who still tyle the 
lodge and swear the candidates, upon 
horrible penalties, to keep secrets now 
as common as the stairs that mount the 
capitol. These men look upon you as 
an unworthy brother, even if they have 
not dared to expel you. How will these 
men tolerate your exposure of the con- 
trast between the public proclamation 
and the secret appropriation of the 
Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the State 
of New York, at which upward of one 
hundred and ten subordinate chapters 
zvere represented in February, 1829, as 
detailed in your twenty-first letter? 
How will they endure your confirma- 
tion of the essential facts in Avery Al- 
lyn's affidavit, that Richard Howard had 
confessed himself the executioner of 
Morgan ; that he made this confession 
at an encampment of Knights Templar 
at St. John's Hall, in the city of New 
York, under the sealed obligation, and 
had then been furnished with money 
and means to abscond and go to Europe, 
as related in your twenty-second let- 
ter? How will they bear the twenty- 
fifth letter? The account of the un- 
blushing grant of money by the grand 
lodge of the State of New York to one 
of the most active conspirators? of the 
debates in which you bore a part? and 
of the appropriations, since which you 
have never crossed the threshold of a 
lodge-room? You are still surrounded 
by members of the grand lodge, of the 
grand chapter, and of the encampment 
at St. John's Hall. And although per- 
haps you may receive no more letters 
from Washington like that of the 25th 
of February, 1827, there are other 
modes of hostility in which we well 
know that the Masonic power can make 
itself felt. 

But if the boldness with which you 
have dared to speak is not without its 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



55 



perils now, neither will it, I trust, be 
without its remembrance or its recom- 
pense hereafter. I believe your letters 
to be well adapted to promote a great 
national reform of morals in the abo- 
lition of Freemasonry; and the more 
extensively they are read the more 
l^eneficial will be their effect. 

This letter is confidential, and if sat- 
isfactory to you may be followed by 
others suggested by the information 
contained in your book, and perhaps 
discussing some of your opinions. The 
Masonic controversy will form a large 
chapter in the annals of this Union 
probably for several years to come. It 
presents already a prominent feature in 
the canvass for the presidential elec- 
tion, and that is precisely the reason for 
wishing- to meddle as little with it as 
possible until that question shall have 
been settled. It will assuredly survive 
that event, and in all probability will 
form an essential ingredient in more 
than one quadrennial choice of presi- 
dent, if more than one we are destined 
to have. It is my deliberate opinion 
that the Antimasonic party ought not to 
subside, or to suspend its exertions, till 
Freemasonry shall have ceased to exist 
in this country. The career before 
them is long and dreary, but not dis- 
couraging; the object is single, just, 
and honorable. You have put your 
hand to the plow. Let it not be with- 
drawn. For contributing so largely to 
the end you w411 deserve to be ranked 
among the benefactors of mankind. 

I am, very respectfully, your friend, 
John Quincy Adams. 



lEittnnaL 



John D. Caldwell, Grand Secretary of 
''Select Masters" in Ohio, said to Jona- 
than Blanchard, former editor of the 
Cynosure : 

"We respect such gentlemen as you. 
because you are sincere ; and you must 
be aware that we are disintegrating 
your churches." 

The pastors of foreign-born congre- 
gations realize the truth of the words 
of Grand Secretary Caldwell. Within a 
few blocks of the place where our An- 
nual Meeting gathered are thousands of 
Swedes who have forsaken the Church 
for the Lodge, 



- We call the special attention of our 
readers to the article ''Confucian Can- 
didates Challenged," appearing in this 
number. It will be remembered that 
the grand master of the Massachusetts 
Grand Lodge authorized the establish- 
ment of a lodge in Pekin, China, (see 
Cynosures of December, 191 6, and Jan- 
uary, 1917), and based his right to do 
so on the report of a committee, headed 
by Roscoe Pound, Dean of the Harvard 
University Law School, that the relig- 
ions of Confucious and Buddha are 
monotheistic, and that, therefore, wor- 
shipers of them are fit material to be 
received into Masonic lodges. 

The very able article in this number 
shows how completely the Massachu- 
setts committee w^as governed in their 
findings by what they zvished to have 
true. There seems to be no real evi- 
dence that the ancient religions of 
China are or ever were monotheistic. 



A BEREAVED MOTHER. 

"I am going right to the college as 
soon as my poor boy is buried." his 
mother is reported to have said, "and I 
am going to tell the faculty just how 
my son was treated and the condition 
he was in. There is no chance of bring- 
ing him back to life, but it may serve 
as a warning to others if the heads of 
the institution exercise more precaution 
in the matter of the boyish pranks 
of the students." The night before the 
funeral, officers of the Phi Sigma Kappa 
could not be reached. The chancellor 
of Alpha Phi threw doubt on the story 
of roughness or risk; citing the tradi- 
tion of the fraternities of the College 
of the City of New York, which ex- 
cluded initiations from college grounds 
and the vicinity, and alleging that there 
was not grass enough on the campus to 
verify an important feature of the story 
which w^as told. 

No one denies that for several da^•- 
this first-year student had not been per- 
fectly well, although until the initiation 
he had been alile to attend classes. On 
returning home after initiation he said 
he felt worse, and from that time he 



56 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



remained in beci until he died. The boy 
told his mother that the other boys han- 
dled him roughly and rolled him in wet 
grass on the campus. His cold rapidly 
developed into meningitis, but the phy- 
sician refused to discuss the case. If the 
slighter preceding ilhiess was the begin- 
ning of what would have terminated in 
the same way, whatever happened, it is 
unfortunate that the initiation occurred 
just when the fear that recovery w^as 
prevented fell as a life-long burden on 
members of his society. Too many col- 
lege graduates must carry memories, 
that in like manner darken the recollec- 
tion of college days. Besides the imme- 
diate victim there are the other boys — 
and the mother. 



DIES AFTER INITIATION. 

A grieving mother bowed her head 
over the body of her student son in 
Flushing, L. L. last night and vowed 
amid her tears that after he was buried 
she would w^age a war to purge college 
life of the dangerous excesses of fra- 
ternity initiations. 

Her son — William Ashcom Bullock, 
nineteen, a freshmen at the College of 
the City of New York — had died of 
spinal meningitis following a severe 
cold he caught soon after being soaked 
to the skin in the course of his induction 
into the mysteries of a student Greek 
letter society. — Nezv York American, 
May lo, 191 7. 



MASONRY IN POLITICS. 

The old delusion that Freemasonry 
should be kept out of politics is fast fad- 
ing away. — Inter-State Freemason. 

It is wTong to mix politics into Ma- 
sonry, but eminently proper to mix Ma- 
sonry into politics. — Ten'as Freemason. 

The Masonic Home Journal of Louis- 
vile, Ky., is among the conservative, yet 
one of the most able Masonic publica- 
tions of the country, and, like the other 
far-seeing craft papers, it has come to 
realize that Masonry must practice as 
well as preach ; that to accompHsh the 
greatest good to mankind it must enter 
more into the practical affairs of Hfe.^ — 
Masonic Chronicler. 

The place of Masonry in politics be- 
comes more and more the question in the 
minds of this greater number of crafts- 



men. And by ''politics" we cannot be 
misunderstood to refer to partisan or 
factional politics, but that which the 
Century dictionary dehnes as "the the- 
ory and practice of obtaining the ends 
of civil society as perfectly as possible." 
* * '•' In fact, the active participation 
of Masonry and Masons in politics is not 
a new departure even in this country. — - 
Masonic Flome Journal. 

This last quotation would appear to 
deny that Masons seek to control par- 
tisan politics.. And why should they 
have control when they are a minority 
of the voters? It is, however, a well 
known fact that, outside of the large cit- 
ies, pubhc offices are generally filled by 
Masons, no matter which party is in 
power. That is mixing Masonry into 
poitics in the most pernicious way, call it 
what you please. 



The preparation of a candidate for the 
ceremonies of initiation symbolizes one 
of the principles of our fraternity — that 
a man is taken in on his character and 
personal moral worth, and not on his 
external honors and rank. He is stripped 
of all distinctions, and comes in on the 
level with all who have gone the way 
before, no matter what may be his status 
in the outer world. — Texas Freemason. 

We have never known of Masons to 
be stripped of anything but their clothes. 
If they are stripped of their distinctions 
too they must be queer looking birds. 



A VETERAN MACCABEE VANISHES. 

Beyond the report given by a daily 
newspaper, March 23, we know little 
about the merits or outcome of a case 
of alleged dishonesty. As the story 
goes, a man disappeared from the city 
where he had been financial secretary 
of a lodge of Maccabees a quarter of a 
century. It transpired that $9,000 had 
probably been collected on forged cer- 
tificates, and had certainly disappeared, 
like the secretary responsible for them. 
When found in an adjoining state, he 
had been working for two weeks under 
an assumed name, but under the ques- 
tioning of the city marshal, denial of his 
true name broke down. Admitting at 
length that the name in the warrant was 
his own, he returned under arrest with- 
out objecting. Of course it would be 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



-57 



rash to draw the widest inferences — 
possibly almost as rash as to entrust 
life insurance to the care of secret so- 
cieties. 



STRAWS IN THE WIND. 

"Devoted to the interests of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd-Fellows, the 
Fraternal Record is in a position to indi- 
cate which way the prevailing wind 
blows. For instance, it reports that 
''Rep.'s Parker and Baumes, under in- 
structions from the Grand Encampment 
of New York, asked to correct ritual for 
installation of Subordinate Encampment 
officers, and make the same non-sectarian 
by striking out the word 'Christian' and 
inserting the word 'religious.' " 

An incorrect ritual ought surely to be 
made correct. Since it is well recognized 
by the order that ''Christianity is a sect," 
it must be unavoidable to strike out so 
objectionable a word as Christian. 



"Our order bars from within its coun- 
cils both politics and religion." 

Must we, then, be careful not to slip 
into the error of miscalling it a "good 
enough religion" ? 



"It is now permissible for a subordinate 
encampment which pays sick benefits, to 
provide for the admission of non-bene- 
ficial members, provided the constitution 
or general law of the jurisdiction author- 
izes such action." 

Will they now talk of lodge charity 
and non-charity? 



A CREDIT TO PRINCETON. 

Richard Cleveland, son of the late 
president, is a leader among five promi- 
nent sophomores at Princeton wdio re- 
fuse to be club members in 191 7, pro- 
testing chiefly that the club system is 
undemocratic. The protesting five are 
said to represent more than fifteen mem- 
bers of the sophomore class who enter- 
tain the same objection. It is not often 
that students or college faculties com- 
plain of open literary societies as dis- 
orderly, demoralizing, or undemocratic, 
but both men's and women's colleges 
secret fraternities have invited serious 
objection. Students themselves have 
shared the adverse opinion, and it is 



easy to imagine that the stand taken by 
these prominent sophomores has de- 
lighted not a few of the Alumni who 
vividly recollect undergraduate condi- 
tions at Princeton. 



A BALL AND A SQUEAL. 

We are not responsible for the truth 
of a hardly credible report sent to a Bos- 
ton newspaper, apparently by a Saugus, 
Massachusetts, news correspondent. Ac- 
cording to the report, Saugus Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, held a New Year 
ball in the town hall, at which the com- 
mittee in charge had promised to give 
five babies to persons desiring to take 
children into their homes. The same 
committee also promised to find a home 
for a beautiful little three-year-old girl 
whose name was Dorothy. Pictures of 
children were published. Announcement 
of the fortunate names would be made 
from the platform. 

The newspapers and their readers 
were in expectation of an interesting 
scene in connection with the" annual ball, 
and the Knights were already credited 
with an almost unprecedented act of pe- 
culiar beneficence. Judge of the sympa- 
thy felt for the wife of one of the com- 
mittee's own members — a lady in no way 
responsible for the result — when she was 
made a partner in receiving the only in- 
fant given ; namely, a three-months '-old 
pig. Sympathy for the couple and con- 
tempt for the donation is credited to 
residents of the town. But, after all, 
how much does this dififer in spirit and 
method from a good part of lodge 
promise and performance? 



An oak at Mt. Vernon, said to have 
been a favorite of Washington, fell in 
1882 in a storm, and -was devoted to the 
encouragement of theft and lying. How 
so ? Thus : Freemasons got the tree 
and made it into jNIasonic gavels for dis- 
tribution among the lodges. That was 
theft, morally, for the tree belonged to 
the American people, if to no individual. 
It was also an attempt to steal from 
Washington's reputation to make some- 
thing for the lodge. 

It was lying in that it was an attempt 
to deceive the country lodges, and the 
dupes outside them, into believing that 



58 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



Washington was a great patron of the 
order. \\'ashington left such evidence 
of his opinion of Freemasonry behind 
him that were he now Hving he would 
be a good candidate for the president of 
the National Christian Association. 



HERE ARE SEVEN REASONS. 

There are seven reasons why every 
blaster Alason should apply for and re- 
ceive the degrees of Scottish rite free- 
masonry : 

1. Scottish rite Masonry offers an 
unsurpassed field for study. 

2. It presents an unexcelled oppor- 
tunity for the practical demonstration of 
the teachings of Freemasonry. 

3. It gives you a fellowship with the 
deepest minds and the purest characters 
of Freemasonry in its literature. 

4. It allows you to participate in the 
glorious work of spreading the propa- 
ganda of the "Fatherhood of God and 
the Brotherhood of A-lan." 

5. It gives you a greater incentive to 
higher thoughts and nobler deeds, be- 
cause of a greater knowledge of your 
responsibilities, and of the history of the 
institution of Scottish rite Masonry. 

6. It creates within you a greater love 
for your fellowman ; a more lofty patri- 
otism, and a deeper love for your Crea- 
tor. 

7. It creates within you a greater love 
for chivalry ; a greater respect for phil- 
osophy, and a never-ending love for your 
mother lodge. — Brotherhood. 

The most important reason is omitted 
— the Scottish Rite of thirty degrees of- 
fers an 4jinprecedented opportunity for a 
large income to the lodge. Count the 
initiation fees ! 



LAX OR INDIFFERENT. 

Caution against indulging too vision- 
ary ideas of what is inside the lodge, 
may be wasted on fascinated candidates 
waiting in anxious hope of not being 
blackballed. Even if candidates stood on 
their heads, all knowledge would not set- 
tle in their brains ; and if they rode the 
goat around a ring hung with Bible pic- 
tures, including that of the Good Samar- 
itan, they would not encompass within 
their personal experience and character 
all virtues possible to man ; but don't 
waste breath repeating this to a would- 



be Mason, or an outsider dazzled by 
glaring Odd-Fellow red. All within 
must be serene. Some others who still 
retain their senses may regard with cau- 
tion — not exaggerated but reasonable — 
representations made by enthusiastic ad- 
vocates of their order, when they con- 
sider possibilities betrayed by a report 
of incidents cited by the Odd-Fellow Re- 
view of June, 1916, in an article urging 
that "More prompt attention be paid to 
communications in. regard to sick mem- 
bers of other. lodges." 

Case A. While absent from the place 
where his own lodge was located, a mem- 
ber was sick three weeks. His own 
lodge, being notified, returned its report 
of his standing, and stated that he was 
entitled to sick benefits for two weeks. 
For this amount his own lodge also sent 
the other one a check, which the secre- 
tary receiving it turned over to the treas- 
urer, failing at the same time to record 
it. The following week the beneficiary 
was in the lodge, where he asked if his 
own lodge had sent his sick benefits. 
The secretary reported in the negative. 
After waiting four weeks longer, he 
communicated with his own lodge, find- 
ing then that the check had been sent 
six weeks ago and had been returned. 
We judge that the return had been 
through the bank in due course. The 
disgusted member announced his inten- 
tion of leaving the order. 

Case B. Two lodges were but few 
miles apart, and a member being sick 
sent word to the nearer one, which sent 
notice to his home lodge, awaiting in- 
structions two weeks. An order for sick 
benefits was then drawn, and of this his 
home lodge was notified. It was at the 
same time asked to forward the benefits 
at once. Then followed six more weeks, 
at the end of which the money at last 
came. Seven weeks of delay in a case 
of sickness must have strained the three 
links pretty hard. 

Case C. Like case B, this also relates 
to a "transient Brother." After a lin- 
gering illness he died, A prompt answer 
came when the first communication was 
made. Then while he was still living 
his wife died, leaving 'no one in the 
house to take care of him. This made 
fresh communications necessary, but they 
elicited no response. At length the sick 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



59 



man wrote directly to his own lodge, ob- 
taining the reply, "We will give instruc- 
tions to the lodge at once." But none 
came before he died. An appeal regard- 
ing funeral expenses brought payment 
two months after this member's death. 
These instances are offered here only for 
what they may be worth. They may 
happen to check a growing and unwar- 
ranted outside fascination. 



CONFESSEDLY UNUSUAL. 

''An unusual gathering this last Fri- 
day evening will be little known in the 
citv, but as being unique deserves spe- 
cial mention," writes a contributor to 
a leading denomination organ, when 
speaking of the Sunday meetings in 
Buffalo. 

''Mr. Rodeheaver, who is himself a 
Mason, has spoken at nearly every lodge 
in the city. Finally the commander of 
the Consistory of thirty-second degree 
Masons 'hit the trail.' He then invited 
Mr. Rodeheaver to speak to the Con- 
sistory members at a gathering which 
followed one of their degrees and was 
after the evening tabernacle meeting. 
At the beginning of the meeting the com- 
mander said that in all his life he had 
never been so enthusiastic over any 
movement as this revival. Mr. Rode- 
heaver then gave a forty-five minute ad- 
dress which was a straightforward 
appeal to the men to be real not nomi- 
nal Masons and to follow the Bible that 
they placed on the altar. At the close 
he gave rhe invitation and eighty-five 
men stood up and gave their allegiance 
to God. The past grand master of the 
Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, who 
was present, said that he had attended 
lodges in every part of the United States 
and in Europe and South America, but 
that he had never before been present 
at so sacred a Masonic meeting. Per- 
sonally, I was more impressed by that 
Masonic meeting than by any of the 
tabernacle meetings, as great as they 
have been. The meeting broke up after 
midnight." 

The first effect of this paragraph is 
sorrow, which ameliorating second 
thoughts cannot wholly remove. That 
this gospel worker lends the prestige 
of his name to an order that suppresses 
his Master's name, while a religious 



journal of wide influence spreads the 
report, is indeed deplorable. Yet in- 
congruity between lodge and tabernacle, 
hoodwink and gospel lamp, together 
with the crushing implication of the 
words "unique" and "unusual," may 
offset part of the evil influence. And, 
then, it may not wholly evade attention, 
that nowhere along the row of thirty- 
two lodges, had the Commander noticed 
the trail which he hit when he arrived 
at the tabernacle. Back from tabernacle 
to lodge he hurried, bringing a mission- 
ary to lingering devotees of supersti- 
tion. Why persist in reporting as "so 
sacred a Masonic meeting" if it had 
ceased froni being pagan, and had given 
place to a "sacred" Christian gather- 
ing? - ^ 



WHAT WE MISS. 

It is truly melancholy to reflect that 
the intellectual and cultured, the religious 
and moral classes so largely fail to 
broaden, enlarge, and dignify their mode 
of living by neglecting to become Re- 
bekahs and Odd-Fellows. We hate to 
tantalize our intelligent readers, not to 
mention actively religious ones, yet we 
cannot forbear culling a few delightful 
items revealing secret society felicities. 
Excuse the construction of the first item ; 
we must follow copy and, moreover, 
could not venture to revise language 
conformed to grammar that 'is obviously 
broad and liberal. 

"The Rebekahs of Fergus Falls had 
a pleasant social at their hall Nov. 2ist. 
There was dancing, cards, and supper, 
about seventy-five being present." 

"The Rebekahs of St. Cloud gave the 
first large social function of the season 
last month. They conducted a fish pond, 
much to the merriment of all assembled. 
This was followed by dancing, and an 
inviting repast was served." 

"The dancing party and lunch given 
by the Rebekahs of Willmar Tuesday 
evening, Nov. 2ist, was very well attend- 
ed. A lunch was served, tables were 
provided for progressive cinch players, 
and the younger generation passed the 
time with dancing." 

"For three years, the ladies of the 
Woman's Relief Corps have been given 
free rent of the I. O. O. F. hall at Ait- 
kin. Monday night, Oct. 30th, the ladies 



60 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



showed their appreciation by serving 
the local Odd-Fellows with a banquet. 
The tables were handsomely trimmed 
with decorations customary to a Hal- 
lowe'en occasion and, following the ban- 
quet, all joined in a social time playing 
cards and dancing." 



BEYOND COMPUTATION. 

"An official certificate," remarks the 
Calif or n la Odd-Fcllozv, ''is but a small 
piece of paper, but when properly sealed 
and attested its value is beyond all com- 
putation." This comment it appends to 
a little anecdote relating to the collection 
of a postal money order. 'T do not know 
a soul in the city to identify me," 
lamented the stranger bringing in the 
money order. Asked, ''Have you your 
official certificate with you?" he showed 
one acknowledging payment of dues to 
a current date. His order was thereupon 
cashed. As its own value was not 
"beyond computation," it must have 
drawn but slightly upon the exhaustless 
treasury of an official certificate. 

We are reminded of a similar incident 
that happened in a state belonging to the 
opposite shore of the continent. A check 
was brought to a bank to be cashed, and 
the stranger presenting it cited a com- 
paratively new pastor in town as a per- 
son to whom he was known. "Do you 
happen to have any letters in your 
pocket?" After this, no further question 
was asked. The title "Rev." may have 
helped, but without that the check would 
probably have been cashed. The same 
person was identified at another bank by 
a postmaster through whose office he had 
but lately received mail. Both checks 
were cashed, not for an Odd-Fellow but 
for a contributor to the Christian 
Cynosure. 



Knight Templars are like those Philis- 
tines (I Sam. 5:3) who set up the Ark 
of God in the temple of their Dagon, 
to make God "Serve with their sins," 
Isa. 43:24. That is to say, these Tem- 
plars think to make Christ subserve Ma- 
sonry. 

But the Ark overthrew Dagon and 
shattered him in his own temple. So 
will Christ shatter the lodge. 



i^etos! of #ur Work. 

REPORT OF ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Cynosure goes to press just pre- 
vious to our Annual Meeting, which 
precludes any report of that gathering 
in this number. In the July Cynosure 
we will give as full an account as pos- 
sible of the sessions, together with re- 
ports and other items of interest. 



Rev. a. B. Simpson^ 
Pastor Gospel Tabernacle, 
President Christian & Missionary Alli- 
ance, 692 Eighth Ave., New York. 

New York, April 18, 1917. 
My dear Brother : 

Replying to your kind letter, I am 
happy to say that I have always been un- 
compromisingly opposed to secret socie- 
ties. But I have no "experience" on the 
subject, as I have always been "con- 
verted." 

Yours in His service, 
(Signed) A. B. Simpson. 



A party who is having missionary 
work done throughout his community 
from this office, writes : "Things are go- 
ing along nicely. The books and tracts 
are doing the work. And the beauty of 
it is, those receiving the literature can- 
not fasten the blame on anyone in par- 
ticular, since each gets his portion 
through the mail from the National 
Christian Association." Reader, is there 
any suggestion in this to you? 



In a letter containing a remittance 
from William K. Bareman, Zeeland, 
Michigan, we quote the following help- 
ful words: "I am sorry that I cannot 
send you more money for the support of 
this worthy cause, but God is able and 
willing to bless the little that is given 
with a true heart ; and my prayer is that 
God may bless you and all of those who 
are working for the advancement of his 
kingdom to the glory of His name." 



A letter received by Secretary W. L 
Phillips, dated May 2nd, 1917, from J. 
H. B. Williams, Assistant-Secretary of 
the General Mission Board of the 
Church of the Brethren, Elgin, Illinois, 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



61 



has these encouraging words: "Please 
tell the Editor for me that he is getting 
out a splendid magazine. The Chris- 
tian Cynosure should have a hundred 
thousand readers." 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV^ W. B. STODDARD. 

I am glad again to report success in 
my department of the work. No town 
of its size does more for the Cynosure 
list than Berne, Indiana. It is always 
a pleasure to visit our many friends in 
the Mennonite Missionary, and other 
churches there. I was given a hearing 
in the largest church in the town and 
also in a large church in the country 
near. There were probably one thou- 
sand persons present at the meetings it 
was my privilege to address while 
there. It is cheering to note the thrift 
and progress of this people as I meet 
them from year to year. They know 
me as "the Cynosure man" and gladly 
respond with their annual contribution 
to what they believe to be a worthy 
cause. 

At Fort Wayne, Ind., I found the 
Bible Training School, as usual, glad 
to get my message. The students were 
called together, and a class period given 
for my address. The student body, 
though not quite one hundred, was 
larger than last year. 

Another pleasure was experienced at 
Huntington, Ind., in my welcome to the 
new home of Brother J. W. Burton, a 
former president of our Pennsylvania 
Association, but now pastor of the Rad- 
ical United Brethren church, at Cen- 
tral College, Ubee, a suburb of Hunt- 
ington. The way being opened, I ad- 
dressed the students and others gath- 
ered in the college chapel there. An in- 
vitation to speak on May second, at the 
dedication of the splendid new publish- 
ing house, recently erected by the Rad- 
ical United Brethren, at Huntington, 
was an undeserved honor. God bless 
this faithful band. This new building 
is undoubtedly destined to be a great 
light center. 

My visits to Flora, Logansport, and 
Lafayette, Ind., were rewarded in many 
ways. I found Elder S. T. Fisher at 
his post of duty at Peru, Ind., and 



when I suggested spending a Sabbath 
with him we were both glad. The serv- 
ices in the Church of the Brethren, to 
which he ministers, were turned over 
to me morning and evening. Several 
spoke of being helped by the antilodge 
truth the Lord enabled the writer to 
make clear. 

A fast express brought me to Chi- 
cago in the midst of a downpour of cold 
rain, but I was glad to see the old 
Prairie State again and to jostle with 
the multitudes that crowd the streets of 
the great city where the Cynosure is 
published. 

I found, as usual, missions and 
churches open for the gospel of the 
antilodge worker. Though not the 
largest in attendance, all were helping 
precious souls for whom Christ died. I 
have spoken in four or five branches 
of Mennonite missions in Chicago, but 
this year I found and addressed a new 
one — a mission on Lincoln avenue sup- 
ported by western churches whose 
founders came from Russia. Some 
praised the message I brought. I was 
told others especially needed it. One 
man said I told the truth, but he had 
put too much money in the Lodge, he 
thought, so he could not afford to give 
it up, though,' had he known what he 
now does, he would never have joined. 

Friends of the Central. Free Metho- 
dist church, Chicago, took good care of 
me and I spoke to unusually large audi- 
ences at that church. Owing to the 
holding of a quarterly meeting I did not 
get a large hearing for my address in 
the Free Methodist church. Glen Ellyn, 
111. I was entertained at the home of our 
president. Rev. D. S. Warner. Dear old 
Wheaton College, where I spent several 
years, rings the -same bell to-day to 
gather the student body to their daily 
work as it did then. It was my privi- 
lege, as in years gone by, to address 
friends new and old who assembled in 
the chapel. I discovered no desire on 
the part of those in authority to give 
up or pass over the antilodge testi- 
mony. While antilodge teaching is not 
a part of the college course, any student 
at Wlieaton who so desires can get 
plenty of good reasons why Christians 
should keep out of the lodges. I no- 



62 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



ticed a full line of N. C. A. tracts dis- 
played in President Blanchard's office. 
Pleasant visits were had with friends 
in Batavia, Elgin and other cities ad- 
jacent to Chicago. 

I love the freedom and comfort of 
tliC Illinois prairie, perhaps because I 
was born in this state and my earliest 
recollections are centered here. Com- 
ing on the trolley into the beautiful, 
busy city of Rockford, 111., I saw an 
untidy sign that read, ''Owls' Nest," 
and I thought surely this is no place 
for "Owls and Bats," but when I came 
to the hotel, I discovered there an agent 
for ''the Camels." He was distributing 
circulars which claimed that the "Cam- 
els" are of ancient origin. They desire, 
it seems, to take care of people morally 
and in other ways. One could now 
get for five dollars, that which would 
cost thirty dollars later on, etc., ad 
nausenm. Why can't people be serious 
and sensible ! It seems there are some 
ready to join every bird and animal out- 
fit that comes to town. Will there never 
be an end to people who are willing to 
be humbugged? 

I am writing from Freeport, 111. 
Notwithstanding that farmers are 
working early and late planting corn, 
there was a good attendance at my lec- 
ture in the Mennonite church last eve- 
ning. Friends have kindly put their au- 
tomobiles at my service. Eleven 
Cynosure subscriptions were obtained 
yesterday. To-night two Lutheran 
churches unite in sending the people 
which they expect to gather earlier in 
their respective churches to the hall 
where at 8 130 I am to open the Ma- 
sonic lodge for their inspection. vSab- 
bath evening I speak (D. V.) in a 
Christian Reformed church, some ten 
miles out in the country. 

The bright sunshine calls forth the 
opening flovs^er and cheers all nature 
into newness of life and beauty. We 
may shut our eyes and forget for the 
moment there is war^as again we hear 
the birds warble their praise to the 
Maker of all. There must be light and 
praise for God is not detroned. In love 
he would bring sweetness to this sin- 
cursed earth. • . • 



REPORT OF SOUTHERN AGENT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

I am still in the thick of the battle. 
Since my last letter I have both lectured 
and preached at the following churches : 
St. Paul M. E. and the First Baptist, 
Pass Christian, Mississippi ; St. Mark's 
Fourth Baptist, Second Zion Baptist, 
Austerlitz Baptist, Progressive Baptist, 
Tulane Baptist, Amozion Baptist, Mount 
Hermon Baptist of New Orleans. All 
of these churches are strongly infested 
w^ith secret society members and senti- 
ment seems to be blending more and 
more toward the lodge, but thank God 
there are a few in each of the churches 
who have not bowed their knees to Baal, 
and others whose eyes are becoming 
open. The large emigration of negroes 
to the north is being felt with some 
alarm, many of the churches are feeling 
it severely. More empty houses are to 
be found here now than in twenty-five 
years. I pray God that those who do 
go North seeking to better their condi- 
tion may prove themselves trustworthy 
in every respect and thereby gain and 
retain the respect and confidence of 
those with whom they are going to live 
in a strange clime. Since the govern- 
ment has authorized the enlistment of 
negroes, a great many are offering them- 
selves to defend the flag of their coun- 
try. I think the editorial in the May 
Cynosure on the war very timely. I 
have several engagements to conduct 
ministers' and deacons' institutes in sev- 
eral leading churches here. Pray for 
the outpouring of the Holy Spirit and I 
may have powder to speak the whole 
truth. 

I was invited by Brother Lewis Jack- 
son, a young man whom I baptized at 
Progressive church, While Castle, La., 
in 1914, to visit Moberly, La., and 
preach a special sermon against the 
lodge and other vices. I responded and 
found a good congregation, very nearly 
all lodge people. The Holy Spirit was 
present and several manifested earnest- 
ness and seemed willing to separate 
themselves and live a pure gospel life. 
Brother Jackson lias renounced all oath- 
bound secret societies and is now preach- 
ing a whole gospel. By special invita- 
tion of Rev. Samuel Smith, pastor of the 



June, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



63 



First Baptist Church of this place, I 
have just closed a very blessed and well 
attended Ministers' and Deacons' In- 
stitute here in St. Bernard. Rev. Mr. 
Smith is a veteran minister of the gos- 
pel and an antilodge man. He founded 
this church here forty years ago and 
has been its continuous pastor. He has 
done and is still doing a great work 
for the uplift of his race. He has 
kept the lodge cactus from taking root 
here. It is indeed wonderful how this 
aged and almost uneducated man of God 
has succeeded so well. He has the re- 
spect of everybody, colored and white, 
old and young, rich and poor. Two 
very wealthy life-long Catholic white 
farmers here refused sacrament from 
the Priest on their deathbed and sent 
ior Rev. Mr. Smith to read, sing and 
pray for them. They accepted Christ by 
faith and died triumphant. 

Many of the colored people of this 
section own from ten to forty acres of 
land and are engaged in truck farm- 
ing. Many of the large sugar cane plan- 
tations have been cut up into small 
plots and sold to the laborers. The 
parish furnishes the colored people with 
good intellectually prepared teachers 
and nine months of schooling. Mrs. 
Priestly is the faithful principal of the 
school at this place and she is doing a 
good work and wonderfully improving 
her pupils. Her school won the prem- 
ium last week in a parish spelling match. 
Just a few miles above here at Terre 
Aux Boeuf the pastor permitted a lodge 
to be organized in his church which has 
since wrecked the church, thus proving 
conclusively, "Ye can not serve God, 
and Mammon, neither can ye serve two 
masters." The secret lodge, the saloon 
and gambling are twin evils akin and 
each imdermining and sapping the life 
out of the church and gradually under- 
mining our Republican institutions. 

"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Forrest City, Ark., May 8, 1917. 
Dear Cynosure : I am yet on firing 
lines, standing in the trenches, a soldier 
for Jesus having on the whole armor 
(Eph. 6:10-17). We must have the 
eight pieces of armor noticed in verses 
14 to 18. This is preparedness day for 
God's soldier. 



I left Brinkley, Ark., last Friday, hav- 
ing taught Bible lessons there for two 
weeks. Nine were converted and many . 
testified how the Lord had saved them 
from the secret lodge. One of the brothers 
testified and said: "When Sister Woods 
came here some years ago, I wanted her 
killed and tried to find a way to have 
it done, but, thank God, to-night I am 
saved from the lodges." Many of the 
sisters also testified to being saved. I 
told my people to come out of secret 
orders and bow down at our Heavenly 
Father's altar. 

I said, Once upon a time we could call 
on some human governor or some great 
man of the nation to help us, but God 
has let all of us know now that his Son 
is governor of the nation. I said to 
them God is a God of peace, and while 
we now have peace let us pray, for the 
great day of God's wrath is coming and 
who will be able to stand ; let us stretch 
forth our hand to God. Let us pray for 
the nation, for righteousness exalts a 
nation and sin is a reproach to any peo- 
ple. Well, here at Forrest City I am 
telling them the same thing and they 
say to me, ''Save time, Sister Roberson. 
Whose side are you on — the Germans?" 
I said, I am a citizen of the United 
States and honor our flag, but I am on 
the Lord's side and I am praying for 
Mr. Wilson, the President, and I am 
praying for the Kaiser, for God told me 
to pray for all men and for kings and 
all that are in authority (I Tim. 2:1-4). 
If God accepts my prayer then I must 
do what he wants me to do, that we may 
lead a quiet and peaceful life. Well, 
we fired into all kinds of sin last night. 
I told all the black men that these secret 
orders would get them into trouble. 
Every riot and every kind of deviltry 
and uprising is planned in some secret 
order. I said, Your lodge god can not 
do you any good. You had better be 
peaceable and look to God. He is our 
peace. Follow peace with all men and 
holiness without which no man shall 
see the Lord (Heb. 12:14). The Word 
of the Lord is right (Ps. 33:4)- I am 
praving for God to bless the Cynosure 
and all its readers. Let us all pray for 
the whole- nation. 

Yours for Him who said, 'T am the 



64 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



June, 1917. 



door; by me if any man enter in he 
shall be saved." 

Mrs. Lizzie Roberson. 



A CHRISTIAN WORKER. 

^Irs. H. Chandler was a prominent 
organizer of lodges in the state of Texas 
up to the time she learned to "abide in 
Christ." Now she is a witness for him 
and does not hesitate to follow where 
he leads. She writes from Dallas, 
Texas, under date of May 9th, 1917: 

"Dear Cynosure: I want first to 
thank God for Jesus. I am saved and 
under the blood. 

"I stopped in Marshall, Texas, and 
held a two weeks' meeting. No one was 
saved, though many seemed to believe. 
Then I went to Palestine, Texas and 
held a five weeks' meeting. There I 
taught many lessons from the Holy 
Bible. Thank God that there the Devil's 
lodge-kingdom felt the power of the 
sword of the Spirit and souls gave them- 
selves to God, receiving the Holy Spirit. 



One man was a prominent Knight of 
Pythias and a drunkard. This man was 
saved from all lodges, all whiskey, snufT 
and tobacco. He is indeed a saved man. 
Many of the women laid off their lodge 
badges and quit the thing for good, and 
accepted Jesus. 

"From there I went to Granger, Tex- 
as. Many were saved. In Tempel, 
Texas, three were saved from sin and 
came out of the Daughters of Tabor. 
In Waxahachie P held a workers' con- 
ference and in that meeting fifteen were 
saved. One was an influential preacher 
who was wearing his Masonic pin. I 
am glad to report to you that he now 
is a saved man, and his Masonic pin is 
seen no more. He now is preaching the 
pins oiT from his brethren. Amen! 

"I have held meetings in eleven towns 
and I have not failed to expose the Devil 
in his secret lodge masks. Pray for 
these people. They tried to mob one 
brother. Pray for me. Jesus said, T 
am the way,' so I am going that way.' 
^^(Mrs.) Hannah Chandler."'' 



Four Hundred Years 

Commemorative Essays on the Reformation of 
Dr. Martin Luther and Its Blessed Results 

IN THE YEAR OF THE 
FOUR-HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE REFORMATION 

By Various Lutheran Writers 
Retail Price jpi.lO, Postpaid. 

We recommend this book to pastors and heads of families as not only one of the latest, but 
one of the best accounts of Martin Luther and the Reformation. Though published in 1917, 
the second edition is already off from the press, and over fifteen thousand copies in all have 
been sold. 

Address: NAT'L CHRISTIAN ASSN., 8.50 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

The author, Mr. B. M. Holt, was for many years a lodge member. He resigned his lodge- 
connection in all due form on account of scruples of conscience; he was not dropped on account 
of delinquency, but voluntarily resigned and received his regular "letter of dimission." 

The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World in particular, 
shows almost exclusively from quotations of prominent Woodmen, official publications, supply 
houses, and others, what the Woodmen teach and do, and points out wherein their teachings and 
practises disagree with Christian principles. The little booklet is sure to be of inestimable value 
in the hands of pastors and others that have occasion to warn a Christian brother against 
joining a lodge, and should be available also in persuading those who have already taken this 
step, to leave the lodge. 

The little paper-covered book comprises 72 pages, size 5x7%. It contains four illustrations of 
secret society paraphernalia. The list price is 25 cents, postpaid. 

Address NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 850 W. Madison St., Chicago 



SPECIAL BARGAINS 

Reductions on Antisecret 
Books 



Our Inyentoiy shows about forty diflFer- 
ent kinds of books and pamphlets-^dds 
I and ends — ^which, on account of the limited 
I supply, it will not pay to advertise in our 
I general catalog. 

While they last we offer them at reduced 
prices. Some are in perfect condition, 
while others are shopworn or slightly dam- 
aged. We have made our prices according- 
ly and will give you the best copies we can. 



SEARCH LIGHTS ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 



SCRAP BOOKS 

Containlncr 31 "Cynosure" (old series) tracts. 
A valuable collection of antilodge llteraturs. 
Paper cover, price, 20 cents. 



PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
THE SIXTH ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION, N. C. A. 

At Syracuse, N. Y., 1874. Addresses by Rev. 

B. T. Roberts, Chas. D. Green (Mayor of Ba- 
tavla, N. Y., during Morgan excitement), Pres. 

C. A. Blanchard, Rev. D. P. Rathbun. Rev. J. 
R. Balrd (ex -Mason). Mrs. C. B. Miller, Elder 
David Bernard, and others. Paper cover, 160 
pages, price, 20 cents. 



This tist offers a fine selection of litera- 
ture on reform lines and after our supply is 
gone, much of it will be impossible to ob- 
tain. 

Terms—Cash with order. If you order 
something which has been sold out we will 
refund your overpayment unless you au- 
thorize us to substitute at our discretion. 
This is distinctly a cash proposition; do not 
order C. O. D. or on approval. 

Cynosure Subscribers, new or old, who 
pay their subscription one year in advance 
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»or any old subscriber who sends in a new 
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($1.50 in all), may select one dollar's worth 
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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 

TION, 

850 W. Madiion St., Chicago, HI. 



PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
THE SEVENTH ANNUAL CON- 
VENTION, N. C. A. 

At Pittsburgh, Pa., 1876. Addresses by Rev. 
D. R. Kerr, D.D., Rev. B. T. Roberts, Prof. J. 
R. W. Sloane, D.D., Pres. J. Blanchard, Rev. 
A. M. MllUgan, D.D., Rev. C. A. Blanchard, and 
others. Paper cover, 96 pages, price 20 cents. 



LIGHT ON FREEMASONRY, APPBIf- 
DIX TO 

By Eld. David Bernard, who was the first 
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FIVE IN ONE 

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LETTERS ON FREEMASONRY TO 
THE FRATERNITY 

By Eld. John G. Steams. Paper' cover, 182 
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Adopted by Sov. Grand Lodipe. Independent 
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KNIGHTS OF THE ORIENT 

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BEMINISCENCES OF MORGAN TIMEa 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
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REVIEW OF TWO MASONIC AD- 
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By Bid. John G. Steams. Paper cover, 72 
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CONDEBffNATION OF SECRET SO- 
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DIVORCE AND REMARRIAGE 

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SECRECY AND CITIZENSHIP 

"Prise Essays" discussing the evils of secret 
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SERMONS AND ADDRESSES ON SE- 
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Cloth cover, price* 60 cents. 

HOLDEN WITH CORDS 

By K. B. Flagg. A thrlUlng narrative which 
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have been damaged by water, but the pages are 
In good condition. 884 pages; cloth cover, price, 
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BROKEN SEAL, THE 

Personal reminiscences of the Abduction and 
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MYSTICAL LIFE, THE, AND HOUSE- 
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GRAND LODGE MASONRY 

Its relation to Civil Government and J^e 
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CAN I BE A FREEMASON AND A 
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By J. J. Bruce, of Rolfe, Iowa. The author 
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on attempting to bring a Masonic criminal to 
histloe learned the evil character of the order, 
^aper cover, 15 pages, price, 2 cents. 

THE CARPENTER BOOKLET 

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cover; 612 pages, price, 50 cents. 

SECRET INSTRUCTIONS OF THE 
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Both books are by Thomas E. Leyden, 
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THE OPEN CONFESSION. 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
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The relation of the Christian, and especially 
the Christian minister, to the secret oath- bound 
lodge. 

A Personal Testimony. — Three things that 
kept Dr. Gray from joining a lodge. 

Attacking Principles, Not Persons. — ^This is 
within our guaranteed constitutional rights and 
is of fxmdamental importance. 

Describing a IViighty Adversary. — ^Not merely 
an evil influence, but a personal spiritual being 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beings like 
himself. And what this Enemy can do and is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System. — Showing 
that it is truly contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 6 cents a 
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CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS. 

These consist of 20 different tracts, envelope 
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Col. Geo. R. Clark, seceder, on Why I Left th« 
Masons. Experience of Stephen Merritt, the 
Evangelist. Graciously Delivered from Seven 
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Oddfellows? The Worship of Secret Societies 
Offered to Satan. Sketch of National Christian 
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The Secret Foe of the Sabbath. How to Save 
Christians from Lodges. Lodge Burial Services. 
Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
surance Lodges? Ethics of Marriage and Home 
Life. Washington, What Kind of a Freemason 
Was He? College Fraternities. Fraternities in 
State Schools. For Women Who Think — Wom- 
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Each, 2 cents; an assortment, 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
gSO W. Madison St CHICAQO, ILL, 




Vol. L. 



CHICAGO, JULY, 1917 



Number 3 




m Praise T$ in the mratb of man 

3, 6, mMftlcr. 

Bcross the sea t heard tbe groans 

Of natfons in the intert^als 
Of wind and wat)c. tbeir blood and benc$ 
Cried ont in torture, crushed by tbrones, 

Jind sucked by priestly cannibals* 

1 dreamed of Treedom, slowly gained 
By martyr meekness, patience, faitb, 
Hnd lo ! an atblete grimly stained, 
Klitb corded muscles battle strained, 
Shouting it on the fields of death. 

T turn me, awe-struck, from the sight, 
Jlmong the clamoring thousands mute; 

T only know that God is right, 

Hnd that the children of the light 
Shall tread the darkness under foot. 

f}: * * * 

6od reigns, and let the earth reioice ! 

T bow before fiis sterner plan, 
Dumb are the organs of my choice; 
f)t speaks In battle's stormy coice, 

1)is praise is the wrath of man. 

Vet, surely as i)e lives, the day 
Of peace f)Z promised shall be ours, 

to fold the flags of war and lay 

Its sword and spear to rust away, 
And sow its ghastly fields with flowers. 



OFFICIAU ORGAN. 
jOCENTJ" ACOPY 



NATIONAL CHRIJTIAN 
ESTABUSHKD 1968 



AJJOCIATION 

1.00 AYEAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



JAMES EDWIN PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor. 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 
PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 
PRESENTATION COPIES—Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, . and to send no bill for the ensumg 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phi Hips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



His Praise Is in tiie Wrath of Man, poem 
b\- J. G. Whittier Cover 

Annual Meeting and Convention : 

Notes on the Annual Convention 65 

Heathen Shrines — Address of Welcome, 
by Rev. John F. Heemstra 67 

Seceders' Testimonies : Greek Letter 
Fraternity, Modern Woodmen of 
America, The Royal Neighbors, Farm- 
ers' Alliance, A. O. U. W., Free- 
masons, and Odd-Fellows 69 

The Church vs. the Lodge, address bv 
Rev. E. J. Cryer 73 

Report of Board of Directors 75 

The Editor's Annual Report 77 

Annual Report of Eastern Secretary, 
Rev. W. B. Stoddard 80 

Annual Report of Southern Agent, Rev. 
F. J. Davidson 81 

Annual Report of "Lizzie Woods" 82 

Convention Letters 82 

Knights of Columbus Invite Shintoist. — 
The Fortnightly Review 84 

The Strike Breaker, by W. H. Morse, 
M. D.— Herald of Gospel Liberty 84 

A Great Missionary Rally 86 

The Bible vs. the Lodge, by Carl L. 
Anderson 86 

"Largeness of Heart," poem by O. G. 
Adams 88 

Policy Holders Would Block Attempted 
Merger, — Chicago Tribune 88 



The Lion of the Tribe of Judah, by Mead 

A. Kelsey 89 

Lodge Statistics 89 

Editorial: 

Passed Along .... ^. . . 90 

Crescent and Scimeter Dulled 90 

Bread on the Waters 91 

News of Our Work: 

Testimony of Mrs. Alice E. Randle 91 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard .92 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 93 

Report of Southern Agent, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson 94 

Contributions 95 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president, Rev. Thomas M. Slater; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomas C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kit- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Lea- 
man, George Slager and W. I. Phillips. 



LECTURERS. - 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St, 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Geraens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck, Grafton, Calif. 

Eld- G. B. Crockett. Dermott. Ark. 



Vol. L, No. 3. 



CHICAGO 



July, I9I7 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, w^hereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have I 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 



ANNUAL MEETING AND CONVENTION 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



Report of Addresses, Testimonies of Seceders, Reports of Officers, etc., and 

Notes on Convention Held in First Reformed Church, 

Chicago, May 28th, 1917. 



NOTES ON THE ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION. 

We owe a debt of gratitude to the 
Consistory and members of the First 
Reformed Church, Roseland, Chicago, 
and to their pastor, Rev. John F. Heem- 
stra, for the use of their church build- 
ings for our Annual Meeting and Con- 
vention on May 28th last. To the cor- 
dial spirit of fellowship and co-operation 
of this and neighboring churches is due, 
in large measure, the success of the 
Convention. 



The morning and afternoon sessions 
were held in the Sunday school building 
adjoining the church. The morning ses- 
sion and part of that in the afternoon 
were devoted to business reports of the 
officers, field agents and the editor of the 
Cynosure and the election of officers for 
the coming year. 

The officers elected to guide the work 
of the Association for the current year 
are: Rev. D. S. Warner, president; 
Rev. John F. Heemstra, vice-president ; 
W. L Phillips, secretary and treasurer ; 
Mrs. N. E. Kellogg, recording secretary, 
and James E. Phillips, assistant secre- 



tary and editor of the Christian Cyno- 
sure. 

The Board of Directors consists of 
Rev. P. A. Kittilsby, Rev. A. H. Lea- 
man, Pres. C. A. Blanchard, Mr. G. 
W. Bond, Rev. D. S. Warner, Rev. G. J. 
Haan, Rev. T. C. McKnight, Air. George 
Slager, Rev. M. P. F. Doermann, Mr. H. 
A. Fischer, Jr., and Rev. Wm. M. Trap. 



Friends voted into corporate mem- 
bership at the Annual Meeting were : Dr. 
J. Ball, Hanover, Ontario, Canada ; Miss 
Laura L. Heath, Chicago, 111. ; I\Ir 
George W. Pike, Chicago, 111. ; Rev. J 
J. Van W^agnen, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Rev 
Edwin T. Preston, Kelseyville, Cal. 
Rev. A. M. Malcom, Albia, Iowa ; Rev 
A. H. Brat, Otley, Iowa; Rev. J. \N 
Sanderson, York, N. Y. ; Rev. ]\Iartin L 
Wagner, Dayton, Ohio, and Prof. Enos 
H. Hess, Grantham, Pa. 

Mrs. Ruth H. Phillips, of Wheaton, 
111., was voted a life membership. 



At the conclusion of the business pro- 
gram, in the afternoon session, the ad- 
dress of welcome was given by Rev. 
John F. Heemstra, pastor of the enter- 
taining church. This address will be 
found elsewhere in this number of the 



66 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



Cynosure, and will serve to introduce 
our readers to Rev. I\Ir. Heemstra, who 
is the newly elected vice-president of the 
National Christian Association. 



from judgeships, from juries and from 
other positions where their lodge rela- 
tions may interfere with their civic du- 
ties. 



Rev. P. A. Kittilsby responded to the 
welcoming address. He showed that the 
opposition of the National Christian y\s- 
sociation to lodges is based on moral 
grounds ; that the lodge is deistic and is 
opposed to every article of the deca- 
logue. "Christ," said he, ''did not come 
to abolish the moral law." Our work is, 
therefore, of fundamental importance. 



"The N. C. A. Work and How to Do 
It" was the subject of an address by 
Rev. W. B. Stoddard. He briefly re- 
viewed the causes that brought about the 
establishment of this association in 1868 
and its history to date. He said that if 
the real object of our work — to get men 
to have a saving knowledge of Christ — 
is not lost sight of, then we will never 
speak in a spirit of antagonism, but of 
love. The way to do antisecret work 
effectively is to use the printed page and 
the spoken work in season and out of 
season, but always with the purpose to 
win men to Christ. 



Among the resolutions adopted was 
the following: Resolved, that the 
lodge oaths and pledges frequently nul- 
lify the civil oath, and defeat justice in 
civil courts. This had been manifested 
repeatedly from the trial of Morgan's 
abductors to the present day." 

Rev. M. P. F. Doermann, one of our 
Directors, spoke very forcefully on this 
resolution. He showed how the lodge 
man is taught to hold his obligations as 
more binding than family ties, and how 
natural it is then for judges, juries, and 
public servants who are lodge members 
to feel bound by their oaths to come to 
the help of brothers in distress, even 
though it cause miscarriage of justice. 
He told of a case which came under his 
personal knowledge where a criminal es- 
caped the just punishment of his crime 
because he was a Mason. That this was 
the reason of the miscarriage of justice, 
was openly declared even by lodge men 
in that community. Lodge men, said 
Rev. Mr. Doermann, should be barred 



Another of the resolutions adopted 
was: "Resolved, that secret fraterni- 
ties, in their rituals and burial services, 
teach a way of salvation without Christ, 
and a code of morals not in accord with 
the Word of God, and hence are inim- 
ical to the soul's highest interests." 

Rev. T. C. McKnight, also of our Di- 
rectors, spoke on this resolution. He had 
a copy of Ecce Orienti, the cypher ritual 
of the Blue Lodge, published by a Ma- 
sonic publishing house for the use of 
Masons. Rev. Mr. McKnight read pas- 
sages from this cypher work to prove by 
their own publication that the religious 
teaching of the lodge is antichristian and 
contrary to the Scriptures. He also 
showed that it is also immoral in that its 
morality is partial and by implication 
does not apply to those outside of the 
order. 



President Blanchard spoke on the fol- 
lowing resolution: "Resolved, that the 
obligations imposed upon members of 
secret societies to conceal the teachings 
and practices of the lodge from husband, 
wife, or child, is contrary to the divine 
constitution of the family, and tends to 
discord, divorce, and the disintegration 
of the home." 

He showed that the family, a divine 
institution, is fundamental to the wel- 
fare and purity of both the church and 
the state. Organizations composed of 
men alone tend to deteriorate in charac- 
ter, as is illustrated by the history of the 
Jesuits and by the vices that attend 
armies. Secret lodges, as illustrated by 
the Freemasons and Odd-Fellows, for 
these and other reasons, tend to lower 
the character of their members and con- 
sequently to disintegrate the home. 



The evening session of the Confer- 
ence was held in the main auditorium of 
the church and was attended by between 
six and seven hundred. Two anthems 
were well rendered by the choir of the 
church. The address of the evening, by 
Rev. E. J. Cryer, District Elder of the 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



67 



Free Methodist Church, and the testi- 
monies of seceders are given elsewhere 
in this number of the Cynosure. A gen- 
erous offering of $36.81 was taken to de- 
fray the expenses of the Conference. 



We regret that more of our friends 
could not have been present with us. It 
would have done you good and it would 
have done us good, too. 

If you want a great inspiration, plan 
to come to the Semi-Centennial Confer- 
ence of next year. We are working on 
the program now and can promise you 
something well worth your while to plan 
to come and stay the three days of the 
Conference. 



HEATHEN SHRINES. 

[Address of Welcome by Rev. John F. 
Heemstva, Pastor of First Reformed 
Church, Roseland, Chicago, to National 
Christian Association Convention, May 
28th, 1917.] 

I realize more and more as I look into 
this thing, that the work of the National 
Christian Association, the Christian 
work that this association stands for in 
rescuing people from the grip of the 
lodge, and keeping others from getting 
into that grip, is of the nature of mis- 
sionary work. 

I want to tell you about a statement 
that I read in a letter that came to me 
very recently from our missionary in 
Japan, Albertus Peters, who is trying to 
reach people wdth Christian truth 
through the newspapers. In the last let- 
ter he sent me, there was this statement. 
A young Japanese who formerly had 
professed Christianity, had fallen away, 
but was again won for the faith by the 
work that Mr. Peters is particularly 
prosecuting. This young man became 
an inquirer, and wanted to again become 
a member of the church. He appeared 
before what we would call a Consistory 
meeting, and they heard his confession, 
and decided that it was all that could be 
desired, until they asked him on one 
point, and here, Mr. Peters said, they 
ran up against a snag. The question was 
as to his position on the matter of ances- 
tral worship : the Buddhist ancestral 
worship and the Shinto ancestral shrine 
in the village in which he lived, and he 
replied that it was his purpose to keep 



up the ancestral worship at the Buddhist 
and Shinto shrines ; that he thought it 
might be done, and he be a merriber of 
the Church of Christ at the same time. 
Only at stated seasons would he worship 
at those other shrines. He thought that 
ancestral worship was not a matter of re- 
ligion, but was simply a patriotic way of 
showing his sympathy with, and his at- 




REV. JOHN F. HEEMSTRA. 

tachment for the great deeds of the fore- 
fathers. In fact, he said that the gov- 
ernment had declared it to be a patriotic 
duty and not a matter of religion. And 
so he proposed to keep that up. 

Mr. Peters wrote in his letter that they 
were astonished at his stand and that it 
was a comparatively new phase of the 
matter with which they had to contend. 
Formerly, twenty or thirty years ago, 
when a person was converted to the 
Christian faith, there was no question 
but that he would break away from idol- 
atry of every kind, but sentiment had 
changed now and people were asked, for 
patriotic reasons, to maintain their rela- 
tions with the glorious past of the Jap- 
anese people, by continuing their wor- 
ship at these ancestral shrines-, and so it 
was a new thing they had to contend 



6S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



with to 
point. Well 



enlighten 



the people on this 
to make the story short, 
they did succeed in getting this young 
man to see the untenable character of his 
position and he gave it up and declared 
he would have nothing more to do with 
ancestral worship. 

Xow. I was thinking as I read Mr. 
Peters' letter how verv similar that sort 



and at the same time and at stated sea- 
sons, whenever it may seem fitting to 
them, also to worship at other shrines. 
They say, "That is all right. Surely the 
Church ought to be satisfied with that." 
They think that they are all right when 
they are in the church — if they conduct 
themselves properly as church members, 
and that the church has no concern with 




FIRST REFORMED CHURCH, ROSELAND, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



of argument is to what we have to con- 
tend with, all through the Christian 
Church, in the matter of the position that 
people take with respect to the lodge. 
There is no question that anyone who 
wdll inform himself on this matter, will 
see that those people who are lodge 
members and who go to lodge meetings 
and take part in their rites and cere- 
monies are worshipping at shrines that 
are other than the Christian altar. This 
is what people w^ant to do ; they want to 
do both ; they want to be considered 
Christians — be members of the Church, 



them outside of that. Oh. my friends, 
this is the thing that we have to con- 
tend with. We have heathenism about 
us of which people must be advised. 

Verily, this work of the National 
Christian Association, in spreading this 
light, and getting people to see these 
things, is missionary work. It seems to 
me that, however one may be called by 
the name Christian and with whatever 
church he may be connected, if he, in 
addition to his relation to that church be- 
longs to an organization that is maintain- 
ing a worship that is not Christian, that 



July, ]917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



69 



is a species of heathenism which he is 
maintaining, just as much so as was that 
young man in Japan who wanted to con- 
tinue the old relations with the heathen 
religion — the ancestral worship — and at 
the same time be a member of the Chris- 
tian Church, for reasons that he had in 
his own mind, but which were not con- 
sistent with the Word of God. Oh, I 
pray that our people may see these 
things, and break away as this young- 
man did. 



SECEDERS' TESTIMONIES. 

[Given in the evening session of the An- 
nnal Convention, Alay 28th, 1917.] 

Dr. Blanchard : We shall now have 
the pleasure of listening to a number of 
our brothers who have been lodge mem- 
bers, but who have been led by the Spirit 
of God to abandon secret associations. 
Greek Letter Fraternities. 

Before calling upon those who are 
present, I will read a letter from one 
who is not able to be here : our friend, 
Mr. Thomas E. Stephens, the author of 
the tract ''Suppose," of which now some- 
thing like four millions of copies have 
been distributed without cost. Already 
thousands of persons have registered 
themselves as Christians because of the 
reading of this tract. If any of you de- 
sire the tract, you can secure it by writ- 
ing to Mr. Thomas E. Stephens, the au- 
thor of this note which I am about to 
read, at 8o8 North La Salle Street— the 
Moody Church— and if any of you have 
not already read that tract it will be for 
your own edification to secure it as well 
as a help to others. Brother Stephens 
says : 

"Regarding my connection with the 
Greek letter fraternity while in college, 
will say this : That when I entered the 
fraternity I did so in almost entire igno- 
rance of the general character of such 
organizations and their tendency toward 
worldliness and conviviality. 

''The fraternity which I joined was 
the only one in the university at that 
time whose members were church mem- 
bers and professing Christians. None of 
them was addicted to tobacco or pro- 
fanity or other evil habits, and in fact 
several of the boys had the ministry in 
view ; and yet less than ten years after- 
wards when I returned I was shocked 



to find that my old fraternity had de- 
teriorated into a smoke house, and was 
no better iri other respects than the other 
fraternities, against whose worldly cus- 
toms this particular fraternity had been 
organized as a protest. The leaven of 
evil in the close interfraternal relation- 
ship which existed in the school had in- 
evitably leavened the whole lump. 

"Shortly afterwards I asked that my 
name be dropped. My request was re- 
fused, but I have never since regarded 
myself as a member. I could not con- 
tinue such a fellowship as this with un- 
believers and be true to God. 

"The reference to 'secret lodgism' in 
the 'call to prayer,' which I handed you 
to-day, indicates what my convictions are 
regarding the lodge question. 

"I am with you in your great work of 
Christian enlightenment. Your most 
cordially, Thomas E. Stephens." 

Modern Woodmen of America. 

Dr. Blanchard : I would suggest that 
the friends whose names I shall announce 
come to the platform, where I am sure 
they will be better heard. First, if it 
please God, we will hear from Brother 
Otto Schroeder, who belonged to one of 
the Woodmen organizations. 

Mr. Otto Schroeder : I greet you in 
the name of Jesus. It was in 1902 that 
I joined the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, but before that I was a member of 
one of the largest churches on the south 
side, Chicago. The church had a sick 
benefit organization for the members. 
We all paid our twenty-five cents dues 
every month, and if anyone was sick he 
received from three to five dollars a 
week. There was more or less quarrel- 
ing in that benefit order of the church 
which turned my heart against the order. 
They would give us ten or twelve weeks' 
sick benefit, and then fight over giving 
any more. If a poor man or woman 
was half dead, they would have to send 
a certificate from the doctor to shovr 
that they were really sick. So I said to 
myself, if they do like, that in a benefit 
order in the church, why not join a 
lodge ? 

Friends, in 1902 when I joined thv- 
lodge, I was a church member, but from 
19T2 until to-day I have been a child of 
God. I do not have to knock at the 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



outer door now and give my password 
to any one. Christ knocked at my heart 
and I let him in, and now I have no 
need of the Lodge. If any one here be- 
longs to any order, I beg of you to-night, 
not for my sake, but for the Lord's sake, 
to give it up. "Come out from among 
them, and be ye separate, and touch not 
the unclean thing." 

When I was a member of the lodge I 
used it as an excuse to hold out part of 
my pay from my wife. I would tell 
her that "We have something going on 
at the lodge meeting to-night ; we are 
going to do something fine at this meet- 
ing" — a lie of course — and I would keep 
about five dollars out of my pay. (I 
not only robbed my wife of five dollars, 
but I robbed her of five dollars a month 
for many months.) I said it was for a 
lodge meeting, but I threw the money 
over the bar of the saloon. In the lodge 
anteroom, when we had a "stag," we 
would have a barrel of beer. Nobody 
brought in the beer — we were not al- 
lowed to — it just rolled in. A glass and 
cigars were provided and pretty soon we 
would be so drunk we would not know 
anything. One night I rode about for 
two hours trying to find my home 'v\ 
Thirty-fifth street, and when I got home 
in the morning my wife said, "You must 
have had an awful big initiation," and 
I said, "Yes, and I owe a man two or 
three dollars. Some fellow died and he 
had no money, and we donated to the 
widow." I got the money by lying. 
W^hen you give Jesus Christ your heart 
and get right with God you will never 
do that. 

When I gave my heart to Jesus Christ 
I said to the Lord, "You take possession 
of my life, and everything I have be- 
longs to you." That night, when I went 
to bed, I thought, Shall I serve the lodge 
or shall I serve God? I was insured 
for a thousand dollars, and the thought 
came. What if I should die — I have four 
boys at home, but no money. Then an- 
other thought came to me, We must 
have a mighty poor God if he can not 
care for his children in this world. I 
guess I can trust him to take care of all 
my family. When I got up in the morn- 
ing I said to my wife, "You write and 
tell that clerk of the Modern Woodmen, 
Auburn Park, 7923, that I am through 



with the lodge." I tell you, friends, 
after you take Jesus Christ for an ex- 
ample, you will not have any fellowship 
with any lodge. 

If every lodge member here will just 
get down on his knees before going to 
bed to-night and ask the Lord to open 
his eyes, he will find it will be the same 
with him as it was with me. 
The Royal Neighbors. 

Dr. Blanchard : 1 wish we had the 
whole night before us, for this is in- 
tensely interesting. I am going to ask 
Mrs. Otto Schroeder to tell us about her 
experience in The Royal Neighbors. 

Mrs. Schroeder: I am very glad to 
stand here as a witness for^Christ to- 
night. I have been a member of the 
Royal Neighbors lodge. When I was 
converted, and Christ came into my 
heart, I thought. What shall I do with 
this lodge? If it is a sinful thing to 
belong to it I do not want it. I prayed 
over it, and went to bed. I wanted to 
join a mission at that time, and I thought 
to myself. They do not receive lodge 
members there, so if I join the mission, 
I cannot keep the lodge. What shall I 
do? Will I take the lodge and leave 
Christ? No, because I once was so un- 
happy, but the night I accepted Christ, 
he made me so happy that I would nut 
leave Christ for the Lodge. I am just 
going to pray about it." They say that 
if you pray, God will direct you by the 
Holy Spirit, and so I prayed; but that 
night I could not rest; I woke up every 
few minutes, and the only thing that was 
on my mind was this- lodge, and what to 
do about it. Finally this verse came to me,* 
"Be ye not unequally yoked together 
with unbelievers ; for what fellowship 
hath righteousness with unrighteous- 
ness, and what connection hath light 
with darkness." You know well enough 
that light and darkness have no fellow- 
ship, for if it is hght, it is fight, and if 
it is dark, it is dark. I thought, "I do 
not want to live in darkness, but if I 
live in sin I will be in the dark." 

In the morning, I said to my husband, 
"I had an awful time last night with 
the Lord, and I just must give up that 
Lodge." He said, "What are you going 
to do about your insurance if you do 
that?" I said, "The Bible says that God 
will take care of widows and orphans. 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



71 



I am going to write a letter to the re- 
corder of the Royal Neighbors and tell 
her I do not want any more fellowship 
with the lodge." I sat right down and 
wrote the letter. When I met the re- 
corder the next time she would not 
speak to me. When I was in the lodge 
meeting and associated with them and 
took part in their dances, which they had 
every month or so, I was all right. The 
money tha-t they took In at their dances 
would go for dresses and suits and 
gowns for the officers of the lodge, and 
the poor common members would hardly 
get a decent handshake. 

I praise God to-night that we don't 
need any password to come to Christ ; 
prayer is my password. If I came to 
the lodge door, and had forgotten the 
password, I could not get in until the 
outer sentry would say, "Is Neighbor 
vSchroeder in good standing?" Praise 
God you can come to him without any 
password if you will open your heart, 
he will quickly come in and sup with 
you, and you with him, and you will not 
be thinking. What am I going to do 
when I die, for I have no money. Praise 
God, he will take care of this body when 
I die. I know^ my soul will go to heaven, 
and I know I have assurance that in 
Christ I shall not fear death, because 
he will go with me. I pray that if there 
are any lodge members here to-night, 
who think it is all right to be a member 
both of a lodge and a church, that they 
will ask God to open their eyes that they 
may distinguish the right from the 
wrong. They will never regret it. I 
never have regretted the day that I 
wrote that letter. My determination is 
to serve Christ and not the Lodge, be- 
cause you cannot serve two masters at_ 
one time. 

The Farmers' Alliance, A. O. U. W., and 
Masonic Order. 

Dr. Blanchard : Professor W. F. 
Rice of Wheaton, 111., will speak next: 

Professor Rice : I have never, at any 
time, in any public way, spoken of my 
connection with any secret organization, 
or expressed my feeling in regard to 
that matter, but I have frequently in 
private counseled w4th young men and 
with others, as to the undesirability of a 
Christian wasting time and substance 
in them. 



When I was a young man, my best 
friend, a neighbor boy, and I decided we 
would join the Farmers' Alliance, which 
afterwards became the Populist party. 
We were farmers, and some of the best 
men among our neighbors were mem- 
bers of the Farmers' Alliance. It seemed 
to be a social organization. We joined, 
and continued our membership for some 
months. Both of us held offices in the 
lodge, but it became political, intensely 
political, and, we believed, un-Amer- 
ican. So we quit, and never went back. 
Our names were dropped for nonpay- 
ment of dues. 

At another time, in a small town, 
there was the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. Some of the best men of 
the town were members of it, and my 
neighbor across the street, with whom I 
was particularly friendly, was a mem.- 
ber, and he suggested that I come in, 
and I did. Now that w^as an unusual 
lodge. We were asked to allow^ our hall 
to be rented on some nights for dances. 
We declined and told them we would not 
have our lodge meeting in a room where 
dances were held. It was a very unusual 
lodge in that way, but ii was not long 
before certain things developed in that 
lodge that somehow or other did not 
seem just right to me. Well, I was sus- 
pended again for nonpayment of dues. 
I had paid in quite a bit, for it was an 
insurance order, and of course I for- 
feited a thousand dollars of" insurance. 

Later on I was in another town, where 
about all the decent men were Masons, 
and it seemed as though to join would 
be a nice thing for my w^ork. Now, you 
see, before I get through I will convict 
myself of having been several kinds of 
a fool! I joined the Masons and they 
made me chaplain. Well, I could not 
talk to the Lord in the words they had in 
their book, so I pra}^ed in my own cus- 
tomary way. I was informed that the 
lodge was not a church meeting, and 
that I should pray the prayers that were 
in the book ; that some people would be 
offended if I prayed in my way. It 
was not very long before I was sus- 
pended for nonpayment of dues. I asked 
them to expel me, but they would not do 
it; I was just suspended for nonpayment 
of dues. 

There are good things about some of 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



these lodges, and there are bad things 
in some of our churclies, so that church 
members, because of their own short- 
comings, often cannot say all that they 
ought to say against the lodges. There 
has never been, to my knowledge, any- 
thing of real good that originated in any 
of these secret orders. All of their acts 
are imitations. ^len cannot gather to- 
gether long in secret bands and main- 
tain an organization with a high pur- 
pose, because it is not in secret that high 
purposes are propagated. 

Whenever a young man comes to me 
and talks to me about the practicability 
of belonging to any sort of secret order, 
I tell him my experience and thus far 
the relating of my experience seems to 
have had a good influence and has kept 
them out of secret orders. 
The Odd-Fellows and Three Other Orders. 

Dr. Blanchard : We will now hear 
from Mr. J. B. Murphy. 

Mr. Murphy : I think this meeting 
to-night is a direct answer to prayers 
which I have been praying for one year, 
and I trust that my testimony will 
glorify God. 

The matter of secret orders has al- 
ways interested me, and I have been told 
by many Christians that it was not right 
to belong to secret orders, but I could 
not get any satisfactory reasons from 
any of them. Now friends, the Bible 
says, "If any of you lack wisdom, let 
him ask of God, that giveth to all men 
liberally, and unbraideth not ; and it 
shall be given him." I went to God in 
prayer and asked him to make it plain 
to me if it is not right to belong to fra- 
ternal orders. I had been a member for 
four years and can heartily endorse all 
that is said here to-night both for and 
against the orders. They are doing some 
good, but they are not causing men to 
be "born again." 

I will tell you how the revelation of 
the evil in fraternal membership came to 
me. Less than two weeks ago I was a 
member in good standing of the Odd- 
Fellows — my dues were paid until July, 
in fact. CJver on Desplaines street, near 
West Madison, I was in a street meeting 
with a group of workers from the 
Moody Bible Institute and had just 
given testimony when an elderly gentle- 
man stepped close to me. He asked me 



where I was from and my name, and 
said, 'T see that you are on Odd-Fel- 
low." I said, "Yes." And then I asked 
him if he was a Christian, and he said, 
"Yes, and for that reason I could not 
be an Odd-Fellow." I told him that I 
had taken this stand, that if there was 
anything in my life that hindered my 
receiving all that God had for me, I 
would put it out of my life. He com- 
mended that position and left me, and 
then I forgot all about the occurrence. 

A couple of days later I received a 
little tract through the mail. I did not 
know where it came from. I did not 
know who in Chicago knew me. I had 
only been here a short while, having 
come from West Virginia. I was struck 
with the headlines of the tract, which 
were these : "Odd-Fellowship a reli- 
gious institution and a rival of the Chris- 
tian Church." When I read that it 
seemed to me that I heard the voice of 
the Master saying, "Upon this rock I 
will build my church ; and the gates of 
Jiell shall not prevail against it." Then 
and there it dawned upon me that I was 
serving that institution which was really 
a rival of the Church of Jesus Christ, 
and again I seemed to hear the voice 
saying to me, "Ye cannot serve two mas- 
ters" at the same time. 

God will give any man light who 
earnestly seeks light and comes to him 
in the right way. I was wearing all my 
emblems — my ring and stick pin — when 
I came to that part of the tract, which 
read : " The Holy Trinity,' Triune 
God,' any recognition of Christ as the 
Saviour of the world, or as a second per- 
son of the Godhead, are purposely 
omitted in order that Christian, Jew or 
Mohammedan may unite in these pray- 
ers." (Grosh's Odd-Fellows' Manual.) 
And then again I read this : "The 
Sovereign Grand Fodge at the session 
of 1888 had the following question sub- 
mitted to it for its decision : Ts it law- 
ful for a chaplain to commence and fin- 
ish his prayer in the name of Christ?' 
In giving his decisions, the Grand Sire, 
after defining the w^ord sect, uses these 
words : 'In this sense, Christianity is a 
sect, hence it is inexpedient, and, I think, 
unlawful, to make prominent mention 
of it (the name of Christ) in lodge 
work.' " (Official Report No. 58.) 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



17> 



That was enough for me. I took off my 
emblems, and went for my case to tear 
up my receipts, but I thought, No, I 
have promised whenever I drop my 
membership, to return my receipts, and 
make my reason known. Therefore 1 
sent my receipts in with this letter, in 
which I took advantage of the opportu- 
nity to give them a little Gospel: 

"Chicago, May 26th, 1917." ( l^>om 
the date you see I am just a little chick 
pecked out of the fraternal orders' shell, 
during the last few days.) 

"I am enclosing my receipts with the 
request that I be permitted to withdraw 
my name as a member of the Order. 
The enclosed pamphlet will explain why. 
I do not wish to remain longer a member 
of an order that forbids the use of the 
name of Christ in lodge work, and in 
their prayers. I know that it is through 
the Lord Jesus Christ that I am, saved ; 
saved from the power of sin, death, and 
hell, and therefore I cannot fellowshii: 
in any way where I cannot worship in 
the name of Christ. 'He that honoreth 
not the Son, honoreth not the Father,' 
so if we would honor God in our lodge 
we must honor his Son, whom he gave 
to us. 'He that despiseth my law, dieth 
without mercy.' 

'Tf we throw Christ out of the lodges 
to keep from offending Jew or Moham- 
medan, we might as well throw him out 
of our homes. If we are guilty of this 
I tell you, upon the authority of God's 
Word — upon which the lodge seemingly 
lays so much stress — it will be a 'fearful 
thing to fall into the hands of the living 
God.' If the charges in the enclosed 
pamphlet are not true, and cannot be 
sustained in detail, I will gladly remain 
a member of the order and w^ill make 
public apology for this letter." 

I wish always to give^God the glory 
and thank him for using me since that 
time, less than two weeks ago, in lead- 
ing two men out from the Odd-Fellows 
order, and I have another almost out. I 
believe in serving the Ford with the 
whole heart. I wish to glorify God for 
revealing this thing to me. 

After I had read this tract and with- 
drawn my membership I began to won- 
der where it came from, and my conver- 
sation on the street with the elderly gen- 
tleman came back to me. I saw the ad- 



dress given on the tract was 850 West 
Madison street, and I decided I would 
go and see what kind of a place it was, 
and what kind of work they were in, and 
lo and behold ! there I met the elderly 
gentleman that I had seen on Madison 
street, our brother, Mr. W. I. Phillips. 
When I told him how the tract had 
blessed me he was very glad and asked 
me over to testify to-night. I wish to 
give God the glory for the way in w^hich 
he sent Brother Phillips to me and re- 
vealed things in answer to prayer. 



THE CHURCH VS. THE LODGE. 

r.Y REV. E. J. CRYER, DISTRICT ELDER, EREE 
METHODIST CHURCH, CHICAGO. 

[An address delivered at the Annual 
Convention, National Christian Associa- 
tion, in Chicago, May 28th, 1917.] 

In addition to the Scripture already 
read in your hearing to-night, I wish Lo 
read a portion found in the 28th of Deu- 
teronomy, the 13th and 14th verses: 
"And the Ford shall make thee the head 
and not the tail ; and thou shalt be above 
only, and thou shalt not be beneath; if 
thou hearken unto the commandments 
of the Ford thy God, which I command 
thee this day, to observe and to do them : 
and thou shalt not go aside from any of 
the w^ords which I command thee this 
day, to the right hand or to the left, to 
go after god$ to serve them." 

The subject for this evening, accord- 
ing to the program, is "The Church vs. 
The Fodge." I do not know whether that 
is worded just right or not. Maybe it is, 
fundamentally — that is, if matters in the 
Church of God at large were as they 
should be. If the church w^ere more ac- 
tive along the line of agitation against 
membership in lodges, probably there 
would not be so many lodges as there are. 

I may say that it has been, and is to- 
dav, and ever shall be, true that the 
Church of God is a divine institution, and 
that secret orders, as long as they have 
existed and as long as thev shall remain, 
are human institutions. We ou^ht there- 
fore, as Christians, to investigate this hu- 
man institution and ascertain if it merits 
our support. Many people, I fear, fail to 
do this. I am persuaded that the church 
must meet the challenge of the lod^^e, 
for it has challenged the church in manv 
ways. Since their name is legion, we can 



74 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



only treat them as a general proposition, 
and consider some of their claims along 
material and religious lines. 

The Church Excels in Charity. 
Their mode of comparison, it seems to 
me, is not fair, inasmuch as they com- 
pare the highest type of their work with 
the lowest order of work that is carried 
on by the church. This is especially true 
in regard to temporal and charitable 
work for it is in these respects that they, 
on the whole, make their greatest claims, 
and compare tlieir work with that of the 




church. Charity and temporal help re- 
late to the lowest sort of work accom- 
plished by the church — important and 
very proper in its place — but even in this, 
the church excels. Take, for example, 
the extensive giving of church people as 
evidenced by the homes that they build 
for aged people, and for orphans, and the 
help extended to those in the community 
who probably do not give towards the 
church, or at least do not contribute 
much of their means for its support. We 
all know that the church constantly ac- 
complishes more along that line than the 
lodges. Then there is also home and for- 
eign missionary work to which young 
men and women in the prime of hfe have 
given themselves by the score for the 
betterment of humanity, even when there 
were great personal sacrifices involved 
and no hope of personal gain. And then, 



again, there are millions of money given 
for the work of home and foreign mis- 
sions where the givers can not expect any 
personal gain, but they give it because of 
their love for Christ and his Church. 

Their claims, and their positions are 
also misleading. I met a man some years 
ago who gave me a very warm hand- 
shake. He was seventy-two 3^ears old, 
and gave me a strange look while he 
gripped my hand in a way that aroused 
my curiosity. Then he said, "You are 
not a Mason, are you?" I said, "No," 
and that gave me an opportunity to in- 
form him regarding my position upon 
that subject. I was surprised when he 
expressed himself as satisfied that his fu- 
ture destiny would be perfectly satisfac- 
tory if he were a good member of the 
lodge. I had a feeling of sorrow for the 
man, who, though he was that old, so 
near the end of the life in this world, was 
trusting to his membership in an order 
of that character for immortality. He 
did not make any profession of ever hav- 
ing been converted to God and of a belief 
in Jesus Christ as the only Saviour. 
"The American Church." 

A few weeks ago I heard a man, who 
was a candidate for alderman in this city, 
speaking in a meeting in which he said 
that he belonged to a certain church, but 
was not active in church work. He also 
said that he was a member of fourteen 
secret societies, and was very active in 
that line of work. And then he made 
another statement that aroused me, when 
he referred to these societies to which he 
belonged as The American Church. I 
say that that statement aroused me and 
made me wonder what we are coming to, 
when a man will publicly take a position 
of that kind, and style the lodges, The 
American Church. That is one reason 
why I felt that perhaps my topic is not 
stated exactly right for the Lodge may be 
working more against the Church than 
the Church as a whole is against the 
Lodge. I believe branches of the church 
of God are active along this line, but the 
church as a whole, I fear, is not doing 
what she should to enlighten the people 
regarding these matters. 
Regeneration Through Law Impossible. 

We find that the Lodge takes a part in 
men's religious life and substitutes mem- 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



75 



bership in the Lodges for membership in 
the Church of God. It seems to me, 
when it comes to that point, that we, as 
church people, should again lay a formal 
protest and assert our position that the 
Church must be supreme. We have de- 
rived our authority for the position 
we take from the Word of God, this 
book called the Holy Bible. In this par- 
ticular there should be no uncertain 
sound, for it is the one book of authority 
in. the matter of morals and acceptability 
before God. The Holy Spirit, through 
this book — God's Word — regenerates 
men who have been ruined by sin anrl 
makes them new and good. When it 
comes to this point the Church of God 
is far in advance of anything that the 
Lodges may claim. The fact is, that the 
Lodges have been trying to make men 
physically and mentally and morally per- 
fect through law. The Lodges will only 
take the best material, but the Church 
gets hold of the lives of men and women 
which have been wrecked and well nigh 
ruined, by sin, and it makes men new, 
and good. And after the church has ac- 
complished that work for some of them, 
then the Lodges come along and are glad 
to take them in. But the Lodges are 
powerless to effect the work of regenera- 
tion which the Church has accomplished. 
So when they begin to talk about the 
Lodges being the "American Church," 
I say, we want to sound the alarm with 
no uncertain sound. The Church stands 
out clear and beyond the best the Lodge 
may do for its members. I am not beht- 
tling any of the good things that the 
Lodges may accomplish, for it is a pretty 
bad institution, indeed, that has not some 
good things. But when they compare 
themselves with the Church, and say that 
a member of the lodge is all right, and 
if he lives up to its rules and regulations 
he is just as good as the members of the 
Church, and has an equal chance for 
eternal life — then I say, on the authority 
of the Word of God, we must protest. 
Cannot Serve Two Masters. 
Without the^ enlightening and purify- 
ing influence of the Church, there would 
not be very much material for the lodges 
to work on. And if that be true, then the 
Church should be thoroughly awake on 
this matter, and they should not let the 
material that they have already produced 



be utilized by the Lodge, for its selfish 
purposes. When I was pastor in. a town 
in the northern part of this state, one 
church in that town publicly announced 
that they had given up their weekly 
prayer meeting because so many of their 
members belonged to the lodges, and the 
lodges had so many meetings that the 
members could not attend them both. 
And so the Church gave way and the 
prayer meeting was given up, and the 
lodge meetings continued. I do not blame 
the lodge so much for that condition as 
I do the church. Undoubtedly the church 
was willing to give up its meetings. She 
should have been alive to her own inter- 
ests ; she should have felt the. importance 
of these services. And so I say that the 
Lodge interferes with the Church by en- 
croaching upon her financial support and 
upon the support in the matter of time 
which is necessary for her. I think that 
is very plain that the two institutions will 
not work together. Or, shall we look at 
it in this way : If the work of the church 
is of first importance, and it is, and the 
opportunity for service of almost every 
character is unlimited, then why divide 
the time and money and give a part to 
that which will detract from the church ? 
The church needs it all, and offers serv- 
ice that demands all of the time and 
money of its members. 

It seems to me that it is very plain that 
the Church of the Living God, which is 
founded upon the Rock against which the 
gates of hell shall not prevail, should take 
no second place, nor even an equal place 
with any institution. But she should 
maintain the place that God designed 
that she should occupy, and go forth and 
meet the challenge of evil in every insti- 
tution that would divide or detract frorn 
her powers. Only thus will she accom- 
plish the work that God designed that 
she should do. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

The Board of Directors, consisting of 
eleven members, held six bi-monthly 
meetings and three special meetings dur- 
ing the year. The interdenominational 
character of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation is shown from the fact that the 
members of the Board are drawn from 
six denominations. We mention this fact 
to correct the impression of some that the 



76 



CFtRTSTTAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1^17 



National Christian Association is a de- 
nominational altair. 

The past year was one of the best in 
the history of the Board. There has 
been an enthusiasm and a spirit of spe- 
cial personal interest which has greatly 
increased the effectiveness of its service 
for our Cause. The financial situation is 
one that has often engrossed our atten- 
tion during the year. Because of a short- 
age of funds, we were obliged to discon- 
tinue the meager cash salaries which had 
been paid to certain of our southern 
workers, but continued their salaries in 
Cynosure subscriptions taken by them- 
selves. We regretted that this action was 
necessary, but there was no help for it. 
The withdrawal of financial support has 
undoubtedly lessened the service of these 
workers somewhat, but their loyalty to 
the Cause has not abated and, in spite of 
the financial handicap, they have faith- 
fully presented the truth concerning the 
lodge. 

We should also speak with apprecia- 
tion of the lecture work done by Rev. 
F. E. Allen of Nebraska, by Elder G. B. 
Crockett in Arkansas, Miss A. E. Randle 
in Louisiana, and Mrs. Hannah Chandler 
in Texas. None of these friends have 
received a salary. These gratuitous serv- 
ices have not been rendered without 
there being heaped upon the workers 
abuse, ostracism, and even threats of 
death. Truly their reward is not in this 
world. 

Eastern Secretary W,. B. Stoddard and 
Field Agent M. A. Kelsey were the only 
other field agents of the Association. 
Secretary Stoddard labored during the 
entire year and Field Agent Kelsey until 
the close of 1916. Not for many years 
have we had a more acceptable lecturer 
than Air. Kelsey, and it was with keen 
regret that our financial restrictions 
made it necessary to dispense with his 
services. 

Your Board has sought in a more defi- 
nite way than heretofore to secure the 
co-operation of the denominations which 
bear a testimony against the secret lodge. 
One denomination, the Christian Re- 
formed, has been very helpful for sev- 
eral years past, and this year more so 
than ever. We trust that other testify- 
ing denominations will become active 
supporters of the National Christian As- 



sociation. W^e are called upon for in- 
formation and assistance by pastors and 
Christian 'workers from all denomina- 
tions. Denominations, therefore, which 
have a testimony against the lodge ought 
in a very positive way to become identi- 
fied with and supporters of this Associa- 
tion. 

Two of the members of our Board 
have made special appeals under their 
own signature to the churches of their 
denominations for financial help. This 
resulted in receipts of over $250.00, and 
more is coming in. As the amount asked 
from each church or society was only 
$5.00, and as the responses are still com- 
ing in, it will be seen that they have been 
quite generous. 

One of the serious problems confront- 
ing the Board has been the increased cost 
of publishing the Cynosure, which to- 
day is twenty-five per cent, more than it 
was before the war prices in paper and 
printing began. We considered raising 
the subscription price of the Cynosure 
to $1.25, as our distress in this particu- 
lar would then be removed, but after 
due consideration it was decided that it 
would be a better policy to secure a 
thousand new subscriptions, for by so 
doing there would result the double ad- 
vantage of reducing the cost of the mag- 
azine per copy, and at the same time in- 
creasing its usefulness by its wider cir- 
culation. The members of the Board 
have agreed among themselves to try to 
secure five new subscribers each. We 
trust there will be many loyal friends 
who will likewise aid. 

Your Board of Directors has adopted 
a plan which we believe will enable the 
Association to secure a larger number 
of antisecret addresses at the minimum 
of cost. It is our purpose to offer five 
dollars and expenses to an approved list 
of ministers who will deliver addresses 
on the lodge in churches other than their 
own, but of their own denominations ; 
they in turn to have an offering taken 
at such meetings for the Association. 
This, it is believed, will in many instances 
cover the cost of the lecture and leave a 
balance with which to extend this plan of 
lecturing. 

Work has been done in Pennsylvania, 
Iowa, Nebraska, New York, and Wash- 
ington, where local associations exist, as 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



11 



well as in Illinois, Arkansas, Massachu- 
setts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, 
Missouri, Michigan, California, Louisi- 
ana, Texas, Georgia, Wisconsin, Kansas, 
Minnesota, North Dakota, Tennessee, 
and the provinces of Ontario, Saskatche- 
wan, and Nova Scotia, Canada. This 
list does not include the work of tract 
distribution, etc., where the workers have 
ordered and paid for their own supplies. 
If a record were kept of all such help- 
ers, it would undoubtedly show work ac- 
complished in practically every state in 
the Union. 

Trust funds in the care of the Asso- 
ciation have been faithfully administered 




and the books audited by an expert ac- 
countant. 

The Carpenter building has been kept 
in good repair, but no alterations or im- 
provements of moment have been made. 
The building, with the exception of that 
part used by our office, is .occupied by 
the Helping Hand Mission, under the 
control of the city missionary society of 
the Christian Reformed churches of Chi- 
cago. 

We recommend to the Annual Meet- 
ing, for corporate membershij) in the 
National Christian Association, Dr. I. 
Ball, Hanover, Ontario, Canada ; Miss 



Laura L. Heath, Chicago, Illinois ; Mr. 
George W. Pike, Chicago, Illinois ; Rev. 
J. J. Van Wagnen, 911 Westcot, Syra- 
cuse, New York ; Rev. Edwin T. Pres- 
ton, Kelseyville, California; Rev. A. M. 
Malcom, Albia, Iowa ; Rev. A. H. Brat, 
Otley, Iowa; Rev. J. W. Sanderson, 
York, New York; Rev. Martin L. Wag- 
ner, Dayton, Ohio, and Prof. Enos Hess, 
(irantham, Pennsylvania. 



EDITOR'S ANNUAL REPORT. 

BY JAMES E. PHILLIPS. 

Last year, when requested to make a 
report, we thought that once would suf- 
fice, as it seems as though the monthly 
visits of the Cynosure are in themselves 
reports. But we shall take this request 
as a call upon us by the Cynosure fam- 
ily, and feel about it a good deal as did 
Bobbie, whose mother, not being pre- 
pared to receive callers, asked him to 
show them to the parlor. Seeing the vis- 
itors glancing- around the room, he said, 
"Well, what do you think of our stuff, 
anyway?" We are not only going to 
show you ''our stuff" in the parlor, but 
will take you on a tour of inspection over 
the whole Cynosure house. 

An editor in our work needs to be an 
optimist, not the kind who is defined as 
"one who does not care what happens, 
so long as it doesn't happen to him," but 
he must be a real optimist. He must be- 
lieve that he is in the Lord's service and 
that in God's own time he will give the 
victory. If he is not an optimist, the 
weight of the opposition and the exten- 
sive reading of the literature of the oth- 
er side will depress him and quench his 
fire. 

We appreciate very deeply the kind 
words about the Cynosure that have 
come to us in our correspondence. We 
appreciate them all the more deeply be- 
cause of the fact that we never would 
have chosen for ourself an editorial 
chair. We took up the editorial work 
with a good deal of misgivings as to 
our ability to render acceptable service. 
We felt as the old darky is reported to 
have felt, who, after three weeks of mar- 
ried life, returned to the parson and 
wished him to untie the knot. ''But you 
must remember, Sam," said the parson, 
"that you took Liza 'for better or for 
worse.' " "Yassir, I knows dat,'' re- 



;hristian cynosure 



July, 1917 



joined Sam, "but — but she's wuss dan I 
took her for." 

The editorial chair really is no sine- 
cure. Some articles that we receive are 
very carefully prepared and are neatly 
typewritten. These require little atten- 
tion, and we are grateful for the care 
bestowed upon them by their authors. 
But we also receive all sorts of contri- 
butions, written in all sorts of ways, 
some fairly presentable and some de- 
cidedly unpresentable, and to evolve 
them into readable articles is not always 
an easy task. Some may ask. Why is 
this necessary? The Cynosure has no 
competition, why exercise such care? 
True, we have no competition in subject 
matter, but we do have very strong com- 
petition in literary tone. The Cynosure 
IS constantly going to new readers who 
will judge it — be attracted or repelled — 
by its neat and businesslike address, or 
its mussy appearance; by the sober, 
forceful statement of facts, or hysterical 
vaporizings ; by the statement of known 
or provable truth, or the admission of 
careless half-truths which are fair to 
neither side. If we would attract 
and hold thoughtful people, we must 
produce a magazine worthy of their 
attention. Do not expect too much 
of your editor, however, for he is 
human. He is not in the same class 
with the old colored preacher who 
declared, 'T'se gwine to preach a pawah- . 
ful sermon dis maunin'. Tse gwine to 
define the undefinable, I'se gwine to ex- 
plain the unexplainable, an' Tse gwine to 
unscrew the unscrutable." 

The editor not only has the pleasure — 
and indeed it is a real pleasure — of read- 
ing the contributions of our friends, but 
now^ and then he enters the fray and 
pays his compliments to Congress, to 
Sam Gompers, or to some fraternal or 
other branch of the lodge family. It is 
much more difficult to write editorials 
than to edit others' writings, for with the 
editorials we feel that the responsibility 
for what is said is all our own. But the 
Cynosure would fall short of its mission 
and effectiveness if it were not for the 
articles contributed by our friends. For- 
ty-two friends aided the Cynosure with 
one or more contributions last year. We 
wish to emphasize our thanks to them 



for the important help thus rendered to 
the magazine and the Cause. 

To be editor in the Cynosure office 
means to be proof reader as well. This 
we sincerely regret, for .we very much 
wish there were some one else on whom 
to lay the blame for the typographical 
errors which may be found now and 
then. Proof reading must be done with 
care, lest we fall into difficulty with 
our contributors. I am reminded of 
a poet who wrote a poem about his little 
boy, the first line of which was, "My son ! 
My pigmy counterpart." When the poet 
read his lines as printed he gasped and 
fainted away, for the printer had set 
them "My son! My pig, my counter- 
part." 

Now, I think I have shown you over 
all of the Cynosure house except the 
attic. It is here where we store the un- 
used material — even our own editorials, 
sometimes. All that is in the attic is 
not placed there because it is not valua- 
ble. Far from it. Sometimes, of course, 
we receive material that is not suited to 
our columns, but more frequently we 
have to lay aside good matter simply be- 
cause we have not the room to print it. 
Now and again we go into our attic and 
bring to light some forgotten treasure 
with much the same result as did Mrs. 
Snow White, who had been houseclean- 
ing, and said to her neighbor : "Dey is 
nothin' lak' movin' things 'round once 
in a while. Why, Ah jes' come across a 
pair ob slippers under de bed dat Ah 
hadn't seen foh five years." 

Just twenty years ago this month the 
Cynosure was changed from a weekly 
to a monthly publication, and, excepting 
the last six issues, the same cover de- 
sign has been used. The new design 
adopted in November makes the 
Cynosure a little more modern and at- 
tractive in appearance and has met with 
general approval, we believe. 

Last year we reported having printed 
375 articles in which some fifty-three or- 
ders received attention. This year there 
were in the neighborhood of 500 articles 
published, and, classing the various 
branches of Freemasonry as one, over a 
hundred different orders received more 
or less full treatment. It is our aim to 
make the Cynosure as widely effective 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



79 



as possible, and we are glad to report 
progress in this regard. 

We want to call your attention to the 
yearly index which appeared in April 
number of the magazine. We take a 
great deal of pains to make the 
Cynosure a valuable reference work for 
pastors and Christian workers who have 
to deal with the lodge. To this end the 
yearly volumes are carefully indexed and 
cross-indexed in such a way that mat- 
ter on the various orders and phases of 
the lodge question is easily available. 

Some of the articles we have pub- 
lished are worthy of note. Rev. Adam 
Murrman's "A Threefold Indictment of 
the Secret Orders" was a very able pres- 
entation of the truth. 

Mr. Herman Newmark, a converted 
Jew, a business man living in Tokio, 
sent an interesting account of how the 
claim of so-called ''brotherhood" col- 
lapsed in the English-speaking Masonic 
lodges in Japan, on account of race an- 
tipathy caused by the war. 

The Modern Knights of St. Paul, a 
Sabbath school order for boys, was writ- 
ten upon by Dr. J. M. Foster, and this, 
together with an analysis of some dozen 
or more similar lodges by The Free 
Methodist, showed conclusively how 
thorough is the attempt to secure lodge 
recruits from among the children of the 
Sunday school. 

We republished at some length a re- 
port to the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, 
upon which a decision was rendered by 
its Grand Master, on the acceptability of 
Confucianists and Buddhists as Free- 
masons. The whole matter was really 
an argument by high Masonic authori- 
ties to prove that Masonry is a religion 
but is not Christian in its teachings and 
is not founded on the Bible. There was 
nothing new to the antilodge man in 
this report, but it was exceedingly valu- 
able in that it showed that Masonry has 
not changed in principle in the fifty years 
of our fight against it and that our rea- 
sons for opposing it are just as necessary 
to-day as they ever have been, and that 
its teaching is vitally antichristian. 

''Rulers Who Are Masons" and "Po- 
litical Freemasonry," two articles by 
"Ex-Attache," which originallv appeared 
in the New York Tribune Weekly Re- 



view, showed the international aspira- 
tions and intrigues of Freemasonry. 

The Stonemen Club, a secret order 
seeking to attain the union of all 
churches by uniting the laymen to the 
"Episcopal church through baptism and 
the laying on of hands by an Episcopal 
Bishop, was laid before our readers. This 
scheme is similar to one used in Eng- 
land, and which almost succeeded in unit- 
ing the Episcopal to the Catholic church. 

Freedom of speech and of the press, 
a vital liberty to all true Americans, and 
one which is constantly being threatened 
by secret orders and other special in- 
terests, was treated by a series of articles 
by Rev. G. A. Pegram, Ph. D., and by 
the editorials at various times.. 

We have continued the publication of 
the letters of ex-President John Quincy 
Adams on Antimasonry. From a liter- 
ary and historic standpoint, these letters 
are invaluable. We trust that they are 
receiving a wide reading, especially since 
the Masons are making strong attempts 
to claim Mr. Adams, as well as his fa- 
ther, John Adams, as members of the 
order. The reason underlying such ex- 
traordinary claims seems to be that a 
lie, if circulated widely, will have the 
same effect with the public as if the lie 
were the truth. 

I must not close without expressing 
gratitude to the friends of this Cause — 
our subscribers — who have so loyally 
stood by us. But the -time has come 
when greater loyaltv is demanded. Not 
since the National Christian Associa- 
tion was organized has the nation been 
called upon to pass through the stress 
which is undoubtedlv before it. This is 
a time when all forms of Christian work 
will suffer because of the insistent de- 
mands for helo from all sides and be- 
cause of the diverting of attention from 
relieious thing^s - duringf a time of war. 
And the Cynosure and the National 
Christian Association, beine amons: 
the most unpopular lines of Christian 
AvorV. are likelv to suffer the most un- 
less God's people are determined to c?irrv 
them forward at all rosts. Do not dis- 
continue vour subscrintion whether vnii 
personally need the Cvnost're or not, 
?nd if vou can possiblv afford it. for 
vnnr dollar helps keen the work p-oinfr. 
The editor is not a pessimist. He is 



80 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



speaking" for the Cause, not for himself. 
He does not say this because he fears 
that he will be reduced to the condition 
of the boy who. as a punishment, had 
been sent to bed without his supper. 
Late in the evening his father appeared 
at his door and whispered, ''Son, could 
you eat some honey in the comb?" 
"Jimny, Dad." he answered, "I could 
eat it in the brush." Your editor is an 
optimist and believes that he can count 
on the loyal support of our subscribers 
if once they realize the necessity that 
confronts us. Let us make this next 
year a better year than ever before, in 
spite of the obstacles that confront us. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE EASTERN 
SECRETARY. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

It has been said of one who made good 
on earth that St. Peter met him at the 
gate and remarked, "You had a pretty 
hard time down there?" "No," came the 
reply. Then St. Peter inquired, "What 
kind of a man are you?" and the reply 
was, "Why, I am a regular." I think 
my record will bear out the statement 
that I have been rather regular in re- 
ports for thirty years. 

There are always some new happen- 
ings, and new experiences to relate. Wis- 
dom in the general conduct of the work 
comes with the years of experience. One 
undertaking a great work is naturally 
filled with enthusiasm and feels that he 
must exert himself to the utmost or little 
will be accomplished. It sometimes takes 
years of experience to learn that it is 
"not by might nor by power, but by my 
Spirit." There is danger of counting too 
much on self and too little on God. As 
the bird requires two wmgs to fly, the 
successful reform worker must realize 
divine help while putting forth his own 
effort. 

The Prophet Ezekiel had visions, and 
accomplished wonders. He beheld a 
whirlwind bright with fire. Four living 
creatures with a like number of faces 
and wings appeared in its unfolding. 
Their faces were like a man, a lion, an 
ox, and an eagle. They were brave, 
strong, willing to serve, and keen of 
vision. They moved straight forward. 

Men who have helped in this world 
have always had visions. The divine fire 



giving light enables them to see that 
which is, and move with a united 
strength toward that which should be. 
I have felt more than ever during the 
year past the tenseness of the conflict, 
and realized more than ever the need of 
the voice that should say, "This is the 
way, walk ye in it." This is a rushing 
age. Prophecy is rapidly being fulfilled. 
Iniquity abounds and the love of many 
waxes cold. In the rushing tide, multi- 
tudes of ministers and churches are be- 
ing carried far out to sea, and are en- 
gulfed by the wild waves of worldly con- 
..formity. We see churches, in which the 
fathers stood firm and preached earnestly 
against the ungodly lodges, surrender- 
ing to their power, and dancing to the 
tune of their silly music. 

Many who wish it were different yield 
to the ungodly forces. How often I have 
heard it said, "It's no use; you are only 
wasting your effort !" But, praise God, 
it is of use ; we are not wasting our ef- 
forts. The Christ we seek to honor will 
be reigning in this world when the cold 
winter winds howl over the forgotten 
graves of these faint-hearted. The 
"Owls" and "Bats" are not to be the per- 
manent organizations in this world. 
Lodge members may shout and dance in 
their day, but the time is not far dis- 
tant when their folly will be apparent to 
all men. That God blesses those who 
honor him has been proved again and 
again in my recent experiences. In ar- 
ranging for the state conventions I have 
sometimes been to more than one city be- 
fore the Spirit has indicated where the 
meetine should be held. God has indi- 
cated the place, and blessed the effort in 
each instance. 

The usual conventions have been held 
in Ohio, New York and Pennsvlvania. 
They have been well sustained, spiritual- 
ly and financially, and have greatly 
strengthened our Cause in the communi- 
ties where they were held. Not a few 
have borne testimony to help received in 
these conventions as well as in other, 
meetings held in connection with them. 
It is never possible to give the number 
influenced to renounce their lodge al- 
legiance, but, judging from expressions 
heard and lodge badges surrendered, I 
judge it is greater this year than here- 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



81 



tofore. Lodges have multii)lied and are 
still multiplying. When there are many 
fishes in the sea, the catch should be 
greater. Probably a greater number 
have been kept from going into the 
lodges than have been gotten out. If, as 
is said, "An ounce of prevention is worth 
a pound of cure," the weight of those 
kept from the lodge snare must be con- 
sideral)le. 

I confess at times my fears have been 
greater than my faith. Like Peter on 
the water, I have viewed the waves, but 
when by faith I have made the efl:"ort it 
has always been rewarded. Often on 
beholding what God has done through 
my efiforts I have had occasion to say to 
myself, Oh, ye of little faith ! When, 
with Ezekiel, we see the living creatures, 
the real forces that be, we wonder that 
ministers should grow cowardly and 
preach anniversary sermons to worldly 
lodges. 

I have been enabled to give one hun- 
dred and forty-five lectures and forty- 
eight other addresses at meetings held 
during the year. The approximate num- 
ber of calls made has been over 2400 
and over one thousand Cynosure sub- 
scriptions have been secured. Collec- 
tions, apart from those used in holding 
the State Conventions, amount to 
$367-34- Railroad fares have amounted 
to $313.79 and hotel accommodations to 
$220.34. Friends have been very kind 
in offering entertainment in their homes. 

In general I may say that the work in 
the Eastern district is better known and 
supported because of the efforts I have 
put forth. Our great cities, New^ York, 
Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh, are receiv- 
ing more copies of the Cynosure this 
year than last. Visits to schools known 
to be friendly have resulted in good to 
many who welcomed the truths given. 
In view of the conditions that obtain, I 
am happily surprised at what has been 
accomplished and render all praise to 
Him who has given the strength needed 
and blessed the seed sown. That his 
Kingdom may soon come and his will be 
done on earth as in heaven is my praver. 



If you witness to anyone about Christ, 
it will have to be while you are on 
earth. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SOUTHERN 
AGENT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

I praise my God for his merciful kind- 
"ness and for strength to press upward. 
It is a great pleasure to account to you 
in my annual report for my stewardship 
beginning May ist, 1916, and ending 
April 30, 1917. 

Since my last annual report death 
has summoned my dear, lingering, but 
patient and loving wife to rest from her 
labor and suffering. It has been an al- 
most unendurable stroke, but I praise 
Him for strength to endure. I am now 
feeling composed again. 

Brethren, it was twenty-nine years 
ago last February that I wa^ commis- 
sioned by the late Rev. James P. Stod- 
dard to do colporteur and evangelistic 
work under employment of the blessed 
and God-sent National Christian Asso- 
ciation, among my people and to carry 
to them a pure gospel of separation 
from sin of all descriptions and of serv- 
ice to God in sjMrit and in truth. Aly 
trials and tril)ulations through secret 
lodge and saloon influences have been 
sore and at times discouraging, but in 
his blessed name I have be^i able to 
stand and warn my people to ''Come out 
from among them, and be ve separate.*' 
(2 Cor. 14-^18.) 

During the >ear I have visited and 
lectured before two state conventions, 
two Sunday school conventions, and 
three conferences. I preached 143 ser- 
mons, delivered 172 lectures, and made 
2,300 house-to-house calls where I read 
the Bible, prayed, left tracts, and dis- 
cussed the lodge, the saloon, and othei 
vices. I have distributed 2,500 tracts 
and have given away 12 Bibles. I have 
secured 425 quarterly subscriptions to 
the Christian Cynosure, which has 
greatly helped in the shedding of light 
on the lodge. I have traveled 2.000 
miles in Louisiana and Mississippi in 
this work. 

I wish I were able to attend the An- 
nual Meeting in person and get inspira- 
tion, but as I cannot I shall content my- 
self by praying for a pentecostal bless- 
ing upon those who do attend. I am not 
in very good health, and ask the fervent 
prayers of the faithfuk 



82 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



ANNUAL REPORT OF "LIZZIE 
WOODS." 

Z^Iariana, Ark., May 25, 191 7. 

I have gone about as the Lord led me 
and, since my last annual report, have 
visited eleven states, viz. : Oklahoma, 
Texas, Louisiana, INIississippi, Alabama, 
Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Tennessee, 
Kansas, and Nebraska. You have seen 
the reports of my worker in my letters in 
the Cynosure each month. I distributed 
many tracts in these different states and 
got a few subscribers for the Cynosure. 
Many have been converted in my meet- 
ings and many saved from the lodges. 
My life has been threatened often, but 
none of these things worry me. God 
put this work on me and I cannot give 
it up, but there is something working in 
me that constrains me to reprove the sin 
of the lodges. 

I got into this work in 1905, through 
receiving some of your tracts at Der- 
mot, Arkansas, while I was mission- 
ary for the Southeast Baptist Wo- 
men's Association and my God has 
kept me at it ever since that time. 
I have no fear of death. He took 
the fear of death out of me. I work for 
money or without money. God provides 
for me in a way I know not of. I don't 
have work appointed me, but I go where 
he wants me to go, and he always pro- 
vides. The people said they would love 
and help me more if I would let their 
lodges alone, but my Heavenly Father 
said, ''Cry aloud and spare not." (Isa. 

58:1.) ^ 

God bless the Annual Meeting, is my 
prayer. These are perilous times. Dear 
brethren, ask God to save the poor ne- 
groes. Tell him, if the black man does 
wrong, to let the law have its course 
with him. Many white people in the 
South black their faces when they want 
to commit crimes, and the black man 
gets punished for it. My friends and 
fellow laborers in the great work, T 
have no ill will toward any man. I am 
only saying this to you because you can 
speak for my people. Many that are 
guilty die and many that are innocent 
die. I know God will put a curse on 
Christian America if the preacher and 
leaders don't cry against this great sin. 
I am praying for all. (i Tim. 2:1-4, 8.") 
I cannot keep the tears back, my poor 



old heart is nearly broken. May God 

save our young men, white and colored. 

Yours 'for the work of Jesus, 

Lizzie Roberson. 



ANNUAL CONVENTION LETTERS. 

Whittle Springs, Tenn., May 22, 1917. 

As it is impossible for me to attend 
the Annual Meeting of the N. C. A., I 
write to say that I shall be with you in 
spirit, and shall be deeply interested in 
the report which will be published in the 
Christian Cynosure. 

My opposition to secret oath-bound 
fraternities has been lifelong. In my 
association with those belonging to such 
orders I have known some good people ; 
but never have I known a deeply devoted 
Christian who was an active Mason or 
Odd-Fellow. Association with such or- 
ders, I believe, tends to chill and finally 
destroy vital piety. 

Not long ago I conversed with an able, 
clear-headed minister of the Gospel. He 
told me he had once joined the Masonic 
order, honestly believing the member- 
ship would give him greater influence 
over those in the lodge, and he hoped 
thereby to win them to Christ. ''But," 
said he, "the lodge met Saturday night, 
and I found that being in the lodge room 
until nearly midnight, and associating 
with those I met there, was a very poor 
way to fit myself for my Sabbath serv- 
ices. I could not afford to spend the 
hours just preceding the Sabbath in such 
company." 

For years this miinister has not met 
with the lodge. I once asked a minister, 
"Why are you not a Mason? So many 
in your church belong to the order?" He 
replied, "I once considered the matter 
seriously. I was intendine to make the 
ministry my life work, and I decided that 
membership In a secret order would not 
help me to be a real Christian, or an ef- 
ficient minister, so I did not join. I have 
never been sorry for the decision I then 
made." 

I trust the Holy Spirit will be with 
those gathered In the Annual Meeting 
and that the Influence of your delibera- 
tions will be far-reaching. 

(Mrs.) Mary C. Baker. 



Lynden, Washington. May 5, 1917. 
I have a feeble hope that T may have 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



83 



an opportunity to attend the Annual 
Meeting, May 28th. The Lord bless you 
and everyone fighting for the worthy 
cause against the works of darkness. 
(Rev.) E. Breen. 



I pray that you may be blest in your 
gathering and the cause advanced great- 
ly. Yours in Christian bonds, 

Mead A. Kelsey. 



Grafton, California, May 20, 1917. 

All I do now in regard to antisecrecy 
work is to distribute some literature and 
show ministers and others the antichris- 
tian tendencies of secret orders, especial- 
ly the major orders, such as Masonry and 
some others. 

My wife having died over four years 
ago, I am making my home with my 
eldest son. My children have all kept 
out of secret orders. It seems to me the 
Cynosure is getting better all the time. 
I should hke to see the antisecret 
churches united. Why could not the 
Radical United Brethren, the Free and 
Wesleyan Methodists and a few others 
unite and make a strong church in num- 
bers and influence? 

(Rev.) p. Beck. 



Richmond, Indiana, May 2^, 1917. 

I wish to send greetings to the breth- 
ren at the Annual Meeting of the Na- 
tional Christian Association. I regret 
not being able to meet with you, but can- 
not on account of other engagements. 
I am now associated as field secretary 
with the American Committee of Ar- 
menian and Syrian Relief and am very 
busy calling the attention of churches and 
communities to the terrible suffering in 
Bible lands and imploring their assist- 
ance. There is the gravest danger that 
with all of our own concerns and the 
heartrending cries from Europe, which 
we should heed, that we will forget those 
in the land that first received the Gospel 
message. ''This ought ye to have done 
and not to have left the other undone." 

You will be interested to know that on 
the 29th I am to have the opportunity, 
which I missed last year on account of 
our Annual Meeting, of addressing the 
ministers of our church belonging to 
the Indiana Yearly Meeting on what I 
regard as the greatest harm of the lodge 
system, and that is its antagonism to our 
Lord. I felt that I would be justified in 
taking this much time from my other 
work, which, however, I shall be serving 
at the same time and place. 



Otley, Iowa, May 30, 19 17. 

Your letter lies before me requesting 
me to send a few lines for the Annual 
Convention from the Iowa Christian As- 
sociation. I shall begin by wishing you 
God's blessing on your meeting. May 
he be your light, your strength and your 
comfort. 

As to our work in the state of Iowa, 
I can do no better than to refer you to 
the reports of the Convention that have 
appeared in the Cynosure. Many eyes 
were opened to the truth, but, alas ! some 
young men joined the lodge to see 
whether things were as represented. 

Our President, Rev. A. M. Malcom, is 
working on this year's program. I am 
trying hard to raise over three hundred 
dollars, and our vice-presidents are try- 
ing to do their ''bit" in getting funds. 
Secretary Van Zyl is holding his own 
well. 

In these war times I fear we are going 
to have a repetition of what happened 
during the Civil and Spanish-American 
wars — that is, that the lodges are going 
to reap a great harvest and get many re- 
cruits into their ranks. This situation 
has raised the question in my mind 
whether it would not be better this year 
not to hold the usual state conventions 
but in their stead employ a good man to 
work among the enlisted soldiers? Is it 
feasible? I would like to have the opin- 
ion of the brethren on it. 

A. H. Brat, Treasurer, I. C. A. 



Quail, Kentucky, June i, 1917. 

I will write a few lines to let you all 
know how I am getting on down in old 
Kentucky. I have not been idle, though 
I have not written anything for the 
Christian Cynosure. I have enjoyed 
the reports in the Cynosure. It seems 
to get better all of the time. The June 
number seems to be the best yet. 

I have just gotten home from a tour 
through Indiana. The lodges have near- 
ly got the people in that state, sure, but I 
thank the Lord I got some of them to 
see the evil in the lodges and come out 
from them. 



S4 



CHRISTIAX CYXOSURE 



Tiilv, 19i; 



I found many good people over there 
that were satisfied with tlie church which 
the Lord founded (Matt. i8:i8) and de- 
sired to glory Him in the church (Eph. 
3:21). and not in the Lodge. I want 
you all to know that I am still on the 
firing line and am satisfied. The people 
here in Kentucky have had a time with 
the lodges until they begin to see them 
as they are. The Orders have done al- 
most everything against me that they 
could since I preached my first sermon 
against them, and the end is not yet. 
They still threaten to fix me in many 
ways, but every time tliey start some- 
thing against me I turn it against them. 
You know Christ said to his first preach- 
ers. "Behold, I send you forth as sheep 
in the midst of wolves, be ye therefore 
wise as serpents and harmless as doves"" 
(Matt. 10:16). What makes us "wise"? 
The Holy Scriptures (2 Tim, 3:15-17). 
The thing for me to do is to search the 
Scriptures (John 5 :39) and it will make 
me more able than any of the secret or- 
der men (Acts 17:11 ). We must do all 
things in tlie name of Christ (^Col. 3:1 J^ 
and not do anvthing in the name of ^la- 
sons, I. O. O; F., K. of P., Owls, Bats 
and Hound Dog (Phil. 3:2). 

So, brethren, go on with the good 
work. I am with you in the one AA'ay. 
(Evangelist I T. L. Davis. 



KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS INVITE 
SHINTOIST. 

The Chicago Cohimhlan and JVesferJi 
Catholic, which claims to be "the oldest 
Catholic paper in the West," but of late 
years has devoted itself exclusively to 
the service of the "Knights of Colum- 
bus," in its edition of April 13 editorially 
recommends "a daint}' Japanese lady, by 
name ^liss Toshiko Sakamaki," who "is 
to bring us the gospel of Shintoism."' 
"We might learn something from the 
gentle lady's teaching," says our con- 
temporary. . . . "We may not be able 
to follow all that ^liss Sakamaki may 
teach us, but we should listen with a re- 
ceptive spirit and a due amount of meek- 
ness." 

We cannot but wonder what the Chi- 
cago clergy think of the eager recep- 
tivity of this K. of C. organ for "the 
gospel of Shintoism," which, a compe- 
tent writer savs in the Catholic Encv- 



clopedia (^A'ol. Mil, p. 304), "is summed 
up in a rather confused mixture of na- 
ture-worship and veneration of ances- 
tors. ... on a basis of pantheism." 
The Fortnightly Rczicz^; ^lay 15, 1917. 

THE STRIKE BREAKER. 

BY W. H. MORSE, M. D. 

On the third day the hod-carriers' 
strike reached a painful acuteness. The 
men had gone out on Thursday, demand- 
ing that their wages should be advanced 
from S3 .00 to S3. 50. The employers of- 
fered S3. 20 at once, whereupon the men 
raised the demand to S3. 75, and on Fri- 
day went about the city visiting the 
buildings in process of erection, and 
called off the few loyal employees and the 
nonunion men who had gone to work. 
Toward the close of the day their atti- 
tude had assumed a threatening aspect, 
toward both the men who were at work 
and the employers ; and in the evening a 
meeting was held at one of the halls, 
when, after several inflammatory 
speeches, the resolution prevailed to 
make a demonstration Saturday morning. 

The hour was early when they gath- 
ered, nearly three hundred strong, and, 
headed by a burly Sicilian who answered 
to the name of "Perk," set forth. They 
were all Italians, and it was plain that 
the leader was the soul of the movement. 
The march was disorderly, but he was 
in control, directing it, and preventing 
the men from stopping at the saloons. 
From one building to another the com- 
pany went, encouraged when they found 
the mason work at a standstill, and lavish 
with threats where they found loyal em- 
ployees in their places. 

It was shortly after nine when they 
reached a tobacco warehouse in process 
of construction. The men on the build- 
ing hurled bricks at them, arousing their 
fury. Breaking down the gate, amid a 
shower of bricks, they rushed the build- 
ing, overturning the mortar tubs, and 
chasing the masons and their helpers oft' 
of the structure. Yelling and waving 
their clubs, they were having little dif- 
ficulty in holding possession, when fifteen 
policemen arrived and scattered the mob. 
Again congregating, they faced the po- 
lice guard at the gate, and for the mo- 
ment it looked as if they were deter- 
mined to again rush the building. 



Tuiv. 191 r 



CKRISTIAX CVXOSrRE 



It was then that the leader stepped 
out in front of his men. 

''It is enough." he said, addressing 
them, and for the advantage of the of- 
ficers. "We have been resisted in our 
rights. Unless the bosses respect our 
just demands by this time on Monday, 
there will be trouble I" 

Then, turning to the policemen, he 
said: "\Miat do you know about that' 
Letting peaceful men be assaulted by 
scabs and rascals I Lock out for a dem- 
onstration on ^londav afternoon that 
will mean business I Hear me I" 

The men dispersed quietly. 

The evening paper, describinc,"- the riot- 
ous proceedings, said : 

'"The ring-leader. Pietro Percuola- 
ture. commonly known as "Perk, is a des- 
perate character, and it is believed that 
this evening and to-morrow there will be 
meetings of the strikers at which be will 
so inflame their tempers as to render the 
situation tense. It is rumored that he is 
of Alalia antecedents. He is a new- 
comer, having been in the city only since 
April, and lives with his brother-in-law. 
Angelo Rocco. on Commercial street. 
The strikers evidently regard him witn 
respect, and will do whatever he directs." 

Monday morning came. The chief of 
police had issued orders to meet the ex- 
pected demonstration at its outset, and 
as the primary measure to put the leader 
under arrest. It had become known that 
the strikers would meet at Central hall, 
on the postoffice square, and on the 
square the policemen assembled. They 
were there at six o'clock. There was no 
sign of the strikers. Seven o'clock came 
but not a striker appeared. One of the 
policemen suggested that perhaps the 
men had met elsewhere, and the sergeant 
directed that his men should go by twos 
to the large buildings which were under 
construction, and. finding the rioters, 
should call the force. 

Twenty minutes later word was sent 
out from headquarters recalling all the 
officers. Word had come that the strik- 
ers had all gone to work at seven o'clock, 
and on all the buildings the men were on 
their jobs. At the high school building, 
among the others at work was "Perk." 
carrying his hod as if nothing had hap- 
pened. 

But what had happened ? 



The reporter of the evening paper, 
after questioning the different men in 
vain, and, finding from the employers 
that they had not yielded, went, just be- 
fore noon, to the Rocco tenement, there 
to await "Perk" when he should come to 
dinner. But he did not come, and tlie 
reporter walked over to the building 
where he was working. The men who 
had been on the strike were eating their 
dinners together, talking in an animated 
way. but not excitably. Inquiry as to 
"Perk" did not elicit reply. But while 
the reporter was endeavoring to gain in- 
formation, the man came out of a tele- 
phone booth and joined the others. 

"\es." he said in answer to the ques- 
tion, "there is a reason why we are on. 
Yes. we accepted the S3. 20. Xotliing do- 
ing!" 

The man was close-mouthed, but the 
newspaper man persisted. 

After a few minutes a tear ran down 
his cheek. 

"It is iiist Ans^eline." he said, "that's 
all." 

"-Angeline?" the reporter asked. 

"Angeline Rocco, you know," the man 
replied. "She is my sister's child." 

The reporter startled at tlie name. The 
morning paper had had an item. It had 
told that Angeline. the eleven-year-old 
daughter of Angelo Rocco, after having 
been ailing for tT\-o days, was in the isola- 
tion hospital with infantile paralysis. 

"Oh. yes I" he said, recalling the item. 
"Oh. your niece? I see. Too bad." 

"Died at ten minutes of eleven," the 
man said. cr\-ing now like a child. 
"Good girl." 

The reporter began to mutter some 
apolog}-. and to formulate an item that 
the girl's death broke the strike, when 
Percuolature caught him by the arm. 

"Good girl." he repeated. "Sure! I 
go home Saturday. She sick. Oh. what 
did she say? 'Z/j ('uncle"!, do stop the 
cuffa ('quarrel I* She see she sick. She 
know her sickness. She say to me. would 
I please read to her out of her Xuozo 
TcsfiDticnfo (Xew Testament). She go 
to the Italian Mission. Yes. sure [ I 
read. Then she sav that she wanted so 
much to go to Sicily and tell all about — 
you know — what she learn at mission. 
If she couldn't, would I "go for her? 
AA'ould I take her Xuoz'o Tesfafiiento^ 



86 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



and let our goita (^ folks) hear it? She 
know her kind of sickness. It would 
make one lame, when she got well, so 
she not go. Oh, she gone now ! Yes, I 
said, I would do so. Ah, I shall !" 

The whistle blew, and with the other 
men he resumed his work. 

The little strike-breaker was buried 
from the isolation hospital that evening, 
the superintendent of the mission con- 
ducting the simple service at the grave, 
the parents and the uncle the only 
mourners. In his hand Percuolature 
held a little red Italian Testament. 
— Herald of Gospel Liberty. 



A GREAT MISSIONARY RALLY. 

The Second Annual Missionary Rally 
under the pastorate of Paul Rader, which 
was held in the Moody Church early 
in June, culminated in over a hundred 
new recruits for the foreign field (in 
addition to the two hundred who volun- 
teered last year) and in an offering of 
over $20,000 in cash and pledges, be- 
sides a considerable quantity of jewelry. 

A total of nearly a dozen boards were 
represented by missionaries and others 
fresh from various fields. The attend- 
ance and enthusiasm ran high, and the 
oitering, despite war conditions and the 
increased cost of living, was twice what 
it was last year. 

The Moody Church has not far from 
fifty representatives in various foreign 
fields, besides the many hundreds who 
have gone out from the Moody Bible In- 
stitute. In addition about a dozen re- 
cent volunteers are ready for immediate 
service, several already having been ac- 
cepted by various boards. 



THE BIBLE VERSUS THE LODGE. 

BY CARL L. ANDERSON. 

[Graduation Essay Delivered June 13, 1917, 
Wheaton College, Illinois.] 

Solomon has said that there is nothing 
new under the sun. The present lodge 
system, with its numerous ramifications, 
is practically a new thing, but secrecy 
has been in the world ever since sin 
started. When Adam and Eve had eaten 
the forbidden fruit they sought to hide 
themselves, for they did not wish to 
meet their Creator. In Acts we read 
that certain of the Jews banded them- 
selves together saying that they would 



neither eat nor drink till they had killed 
Paul. 

I will not here raise the question 
whether patriotism, charity, insurance, 
religion, temperance or the study of ag- 
riculture need secrecy to carry on their 
work. That there is some inconsistency 
we cannot doubt, for we do not need the 
confirmation of Luke to know that "no 
man, when he ligtheth a candle, putteth 
it under a bushel." 

Neither will I show the danger and 
corruption that must come to the gov- 
ernment through having thousands of its 
citizens bound under vicious oaths to 
conceal their secrets. My paper deals 
with a few of the principles of the Bible 
as opposed to the practices of the lodge. 
If I require the Masonic lodge to bear 
the brunt of my criticism, it is because 
the Masonic lodge is the mother of the 
other lodges which can be shown to be 
modeled after her. 

The fundamental principles governing 
the conduct of all lodges and upon which 
their success depends, may be summar- 
ized in these words — conceal and obey. 
Some people seem to think that the only 
criticism raised against the system is its 
secrecy and that we are opposed to it be- 
cause we are offended in being left out. 
That their oaths, penalties, and general 
organization are secrets, I deny. With a 
little effort expended in studying books 
on the Lodge, in reading the testimony 
of those who have seceded for con- 
science sake, and in listening to a few of 
the burial services — where unconverted 
men are declared to be ushered into the 
Grand Lodge Above — one may become 
acquainted with the system without join- 
ing. 

That they exert a secret influence in 
politics, business, and the courts of jus- 
tice, we cannot deny. This alone is suf- 
ficient grounds for putting the system 
under suspicion, for the rule in other 
walks of life is that when men love 
darkness rather than light it is because 
their deeds are evil. 

As Christians we are to take Christ as 
our guide and example. In speaking of 
his own life, near the close of his minis- 
try, he said : 'T spake openly to the 
world, I ever taught in the synagogue, 
and in the temple, whither the Jews al- 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



87 



ways resort ! and in secret have I said 
nothing." His command to us is, "Let 
your light so shine before men that they 
may see your good works and glorify 
your Father which is in heaven.'' \\'hen a 
lodge does a charitable deed they pro- 
claim it from the housetop in order to 
glorify themselves and to gain additional 
members or the good will of men. They 
say nothing, however, about their in- 
itiations, their oaths, their penalties, or 
the way in which they spend their even- 
ings. Lodge members do not show b} 
their lives that they have been inspired 
to higher and nobler living. 

If a man went regularly to prayer 
meeting or to church without showing 
an improvement in his moral character 
we would think that there was some- 
thing the matter with him. As a gen- 
eral rule, those who regularly attend 
lodge meetings do not care for the 
church. Col. George R. Clarke, founder 
of the Pacific Garden ^Mission, Chicago, 
and a thirty-second degree ]Mason before 
his conversion, knew whereof he spoke 
when he said, 'T never saw a drunkard 
lifted up from the gutter by a lodge. I 
never saw a man lifted up into the higher 
plane of religious life by the lodge, but 
the tendency is in the opposite direc- 
tion." ''Every good tree bringeth forth 
good fruit, but a corrupt tree bringeth 
forth evil fruit." "By their fruits ye 
shall know them." 

Christ said, "Swear not at all." Be- 
fore entering the lodge the prospective 
candidate must swear to conceal all that 
may take place. The Old Testament 
law was that ''if a soul swear, pronounc- 
ing with his lips to do evil, or to do 
good, whatsoever it be that a man shall 
pronounce with an oath, and it be hid 
from him, when he knoweth of it, then 
he shall be guilty of one of these." 

These oaths of secrecy are frequently 
administered under threats of penalties 
that would never be tolerated in a civil 
court. For example, the Royal Arch 
Mason takes an oath, part of which is as 
follows : 'T promise and swear that I 
will aid and assist a companion Royal 
Arch ^lason when engaged in any diffi- 
culty ; and espouse his cause so far as to 
extricate him from the same, if in my 
powxr, whether he be right or wrong," 
and that hig "secrets given me in charo:e 



as such, I knowing them to be such, 
shall remain as secure and inviolable in 
my heart as in his own." ^lurder and 
treason is not excepted. The penalty for 
violating the above oath is, "Having my 
skull smote ofif and my brain exposed to 
the scorching rays of the sun." Such 
oaths and penalties are as far from being 
Christ-like as the east is from the west. 

The Bible regards the human body 
with honor and respect, '"Know ye not 
that ye are the temple of God and that 
the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?" The 
lodge initiation seeks to humiliate the 
body while the penalties, even though 
never enforced, are a direct insult to it. 

In the story of the good Samaritan, 
we are taught to regard every one who 
is in need of assistance, as our neighbor. 
The lodge member professes to be be- 
nevolent, but it is not the benevolence of 
the Scripture. The church is open to the 
lame, the poor, the halt, and the blind. 
Jesus always looked on the multiude 
with compassion. The Lodge cares for 
the widows, orphans, and the sick of 
their members who are in good standing, 
that is, those who have paid their dues, 
but this service was part of the contract 
made when the members joined the or- 
ganization. Any insurance company, as 
a business proposition, would do the 
same thing. The lodges are as careful 
as the insurance companies to exclude 
those who are likely soon to need their 
aid. 

The greatest objection to the lodge 
system is that it is religious but anti- 
Christian. They have altars, chaplains, 
and prayers, but they reject recognition 
of Jesus Christ. "Xeither is there salva- 
tion in any other, for there is none other 
name under heaven, given among men, 
whereby we must be saved." Ministers 
acting as Chaplains in their meetings 
who have attempted to repeat Christ's 
name reverently in their prayers, are 
commanded to leave him out. 

In France some persons objected to 
requiring the candidate to believe in God 
and asked the Grand Lodge to strike out 
that article of faith. Their answer was. 
"No, we do not need to strike it out, be- 
cause every man is permitted to translate 
the word 'God' for himself. If a man 
thinks force is God he is perfectly wel- 
come to come to our lodge." 



88 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



Xot only do the lodges reject faith in 
Jesus Christ as necessary for salvation, 
but they teach that initiation into their 
organization is equivalent to the new 
birth. Rev. ^lead A. Kelsey, Field 
Agent for the National Cliristian Asso- 
ciation, said that in one of his meetings 
he noticed an old man listening very at- 
tentively to his lecture. After the meet- 
ing closed, he came forward to ask con- 
cerning Freemasonry. After some dis- 
cussion he said pathetically, "Why, I had 
supposed that if a man lived up to the 
teachings of iMasonry it would be suf- 
ficient." 

A thirty-third degree Mason was Cjuite 
indignant at Billy Sunday when he 
urged the Masons, on their special night, 
to come forward and accept Christ, for, 
this ^lason said, "That was all settled 
when they joined the lodge." "There is 
one God and one mediator between God 
and men, the man Christ Jesus." "The 
blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth 
us from all sin." 

How ministers and Christian peoph 
can remain in such organizations is a 
mystery, for, "Blessed is the man that 
walketh not in the council of the ungod- 
ly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, 
nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful." 
"Xo man can serve two masters." "He 
that is not with me is against me" said 
Christ. "What concord hath Christ with 
Belial or what part hath he that believ- 
eth with an infidel?" "Can two walk to- 
gether except they be agreed?" There 
was no doubt in the mind of the Apostle 
Paul as to the answer to these questions, 
for he also wrote, "Be ye not unequally 
yoked together with unbelievers" but 
"Com-e out from among them, and be ye 
separate." 



Zion's Watchman in a "full salva- 
tion." "separate from the world," un- 
denominational, non-sectarian religious 
weekly paper, W'rite for free sample 
copy. Address L. H. Higley, Publisher, 
Butler, Ind. 



Hatfield, Pa. 
Herewith find one dollar for one year's 
subscription to the Christian Cyno- 
sure. I wish you success for the better- 
ment of the churches and the people. 
Joseph Minniger. 



"LARGENESS OF HEART." 

Give to Thy people as to one of old, 
Largeness of heart and wisdom to 
discern ; 
\A'herever truth is questioned make us 
bold 
The right to vindicate, the wrong to 
spurn. 
Destroy the barriers whereby our souls 
Are kept enslaved to customs or to 
creed ; 
Let not our thoughts and ways be run 
in molds 
Of sentiment. L^pon no broken reed 
Of popular opinion let us lean ; 

Make us to stand upright as sons of 
God ; 
Broaden our vision, keep our senses 
keen, 
Rule us, if needs be, with the iron 
rod ; 
But leave us not to our shortsighted- 
ness. 
Rebuke our greed, our bland hypocricy, 
And give us courage meekly to confess. 
Our weaknesses — our foolish bigotry. 
Largeness of heart — O how we crave 
this gift 
Whereby we triumph through the 
power of love, 
Becoming lever with the grave to lift 
Our brothers from the slough to 
heights above, 
Where they may see the land of corn 
and wine, 
And learn to choose the things that 
make for peace. 
The priceless treasures of the life di- 
vine ; 
The riches that forevermore increase. 
— O. G. Adams, in Springfield Re- 
publican. 



POLICY HOLDERS WOULD BLOCK 
ATTEMPTED MERGER. 

Policy holders in the North American 
L^nion were successful in their petition 
to become parties in the suit of Rufus 
Potts, insurance superintendent, to pre- 
vent the merger of the North American 
Union and the Federal Aid Union. Judge 
Foell, in the Superior Court, yesterday 
granted them permission to file a bill of 
interpleader, which will give them the 
right to enter the action. 

Several weeks ago Judge Foell, on the 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



89 



petition of Attorney General Edward J. 
Brundage, granted an injunction re- 
straining the supreme officers of the 
North American Union from pa\ing 
$228,000 out of the order's treasury as a 
commission to a broker for bringing 
about the merger between the two or- 
ders. It w^as charged in the petition and 
at the hearing that the whole transaction 
was a ''steal." — Chicago Tribune, June 
6, 1917. 



THE LION OF THE TRIBE OF 
JUDAH. 

BY MEAD A. KELSEY, RICHMOND, INDIANA. 

A certain college president in Ne- 
braska did not think it expedient to 
grant my request to address the students 
on the evils of organized secrecy, re- 
marking that he himself belonged to 
nine secret societies and they were all 
good. Learning that he was not only a 
college president but a minister, and that 
in a church which had within a few 
years borne a strong testimony against 
the lodge, I improved the opportunity 
for a little personal work. He, of course, 
was a Mason — for no man can belong to 
nine secret societies without having hav- 
ing found "the mother of them all." 1 
turned my attention to that society and 
show^ed him how that Christ was reject- 
ed in the ritualistic work. Turning on 
me, he said, "How about the Lion of the 
Tribe of Judah ? That stands for Christ 
in Masonry." I am not waiting now to 
discuss that point but to suggest to 
Christian believers w^ho are connected 
with the Masonic fraternity that in keep- 
ing with the college president's interpre- 
tation of the Masonic Lion that they 
propose the following hymn for use in 
their lodge meetings and report their 
experience to the Christian Cynosure 
It is certainly a fine poem on the subject 
and gives the interpretation of the figure 
which all Christians cherish in no un- 
certain words : 

The Conquering Lion of Judah. 

P.. w. c. martin. 

The Lion of Judah goes forth in His 

might, 
To vanquish the wrong and establish the 

right ; 
To shatter the chains of the poor and 

oppressed. 



And millions from Satan's dominion to 
wrest. 

Chorus : ' ' 

The glorious banner of Christ is un- 
furled, 

The Lion of Judah shall conquer the 
world ; 

So the glorious banner of Christ is un- 
furled, 

The banner of Judah's all conquering 
King. 

The Lion of Judah shall conquer the 

world, 
The slay.'^r of souls from his throne shall 

be hurl'd ; 
The powers of darkness shall utterly 

fail, 
For worthy and able is Christ to prevail. 

The Lion of Judah shall reign over all, 
And low^ at His feet ev'ry creature shall 

fall; 
His glory shall saints and archangels 

proclaim, 
O, holy, thrice holy His w^onderful name. 

LODGE STATISTICS. 

We have been asked for a list of the 
various secret orders, with their mem- 
bership. The following figures concern- 
ing the more prominent orders are taken 
from the 1917 edition of "Statistics Fra- 
ternal Societies," and in most cases give 
the membership in the United States 
only : 

Non-Fraternal Societies. 

Freemasonry: ]\Iaster Alasons (United 
States and Canada), 1,829,255; Royal 
Arch Masons, 422,359; Knight Tem- 
plars, 243,590; Shriners, 225,000; Col- 
ored Masonic bodies, 125,000; Scottish 
Rite (figures not obtainable). The In- 
dependent Order of Oddfellows number 
1,606,546, and the ladies' branch, the 
Rebekahs, 752,938 ; Knights of Pythias, 
722,075 ; Ancient' Order of Foresters, 
44,698; Independent Order of Rech- 
abites, 701,040; Order of Good Tem- 
plars, 620,000; Loyal Order of ]\Ioose, 
550,000; Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
490,000; Improved Order of Red ]\Ien. 
469,480; B. P. O. Elks, 453,516; Order 
of Owls, 546,721 ; Ancient Order of 
Druids (in U. S.), 32,917; Ancient Or- 
der of Hibernians, 250,000-: Junior Or- 
der of United American Mechanics. 2^0-, 



90 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



950; Foresters of America, 210.617; 
Patriotic Order of Sons of America, 
270,000; Grand Army' of the Republic, 
149,074; Women's Relief Corps, 161,- 
761; Lmproved Order of Deer, 102,850; 
Fraternal Order of Orioles, 101,221 ; 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, 75,090; 
Sons of Hermann, 64,800; Sons of Vet- 
erans, 56,000; United Confederate Vet- 
erans, 45,000; Ancient and Ihiistrious 
Knights of Malta 45,000; Patriotic Or- 
der of Americans, 36,500; Order Sons 
of St, George, 30,683 ; Ancient and Illus- 
trious Order of the Star of Bethlehem, 
24,600; Fraternal Patriotic Americans, 
21,751, and Red Eagles, 14,872. 

The aggregate membership of the 
foregoing organizations is 17,600,000. 
Fraternal Orders. 

The benefit membership of the follow- 
ing well-known fraternal orders on Jan- 
uary I, 1917, is given as follows: 

Alodern Woodmen of America, 1,008,- 
410; Royal Neighbors of America, 318,- 
^'/2\ W^oodmen of the World (Sovereign 
Camp), 804,291 ; Woodman Circle, 170,- 
631; Woodmen of the World (Pacific 
Jurisdiction), 111,705 ; Women of Wood- 
♦craft, 45,278; Knights of Columbus, 
117,968 ; Ancient Order of United Work- 
men (thirteen states), 131,623; The 
Alaccabees, 302,531 ; Ladies of the Mac- 
cabees, 43,110; Brotherhood of Ameri- 
can Yoeman, 229,602 ; Royal Arcanum, 
206,359; Independent Order of Forest- 
ers, 186,183; Knights and Ladies of Se- 
curity, 177,572; Brotherhood of Railroad 
Train Men, 135,257; Fraternal Aid 
Union, 118,017; Protective Home Circle, 
97,897; Mystic Workers of the World, 
93,505 ; Tribe of Beri Hur, 86,349; Court 
of Honor, 74,810; Ancient Order of 
Gleaners, 68,780. 

There are about 180 fraternal orders 
listed in this book, one of the smaller of 
which is the ''Christian Burden Bearers' 
Association," with a membership of 
1,725. The total membership of all the 
fraternal orders is given as 8,457,000, 
but of course this does not mean eight 
million separate individuals, as a large 
number probably belong to more than 
one order. 



EitomL 



PASSED ALONG. 

The influence of a secret order is uni- 
fied in its continued character and efifect, 
partly by its inherent nature and meth- 
ods, and partly by the quality of its 
members. Personal influence is passed 
along. The already settled drift of the 
stream sweeps in and carries along at the 
same rate and in the same direction each 
fresh tributary it receives. Rather more 
than a dozen years ago, however the case 
may be now, an institution devoted to 
technical education allowed its students 
to join two societies. One of the stu- 
dents told a near relative that members 
of one society made such a failure of 
study, that they lost membership in the 
school to such an extent as to leave the 
society itself depleted. At the beginning 
of each year, hardly m.ore than enough 
returned to continue their technical 
course than were a quorum adequate to 
initiate a new set of prospective failures. 

Much the same lesson is taught by one 
of the illustrations of "The Immortality 
of Influence" used by Editor Bruce Bar- 
ton of the Boston Post. "I knew a cer- 
tain college fraternity," he testifies, 
"whose senior delegation ten years ago 
had a strong man in it who ought to have 
been its leader. Instead of which he 
drank, and left the fraternity leaderless. 
As a result, a weak group of freshmen 
was chosen that year. Three years later, 
when these freshmen were about to be- 
come seniors, they, in turn, chose a weak 
group of freshmen. For ten years weak 
delegations followed one another in that 
fraternity, the influence of one bad man 
perpetuating itself long after he him- 
self had passed." Along with the per- 
petuated influence of ungodly members, 
goes that of tradition or lodge cant, as 
well as the pernicious force of unethical 
lodge obligations. "The evil that men do 
lives after them," is a sad truth to which 
some orders give cumulative emphasis 
by the very fact of their own continued 
existence. 



A little fault will spoil a great char- 
acter, and he who is not against his faults 
is for them. 



CRESCENT AND SCIMETER DULLED 

A melancholy result of the war is the 
aba:ndonment of one of the most gor- 
geous gatherings of Shriners around the 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



91 



very fountain of Milwaukee Zem Zem. 
A water pageant sinks out of sight ;' land 
parades are "halted and disbanded; brilli- 
ant receptions do not receive ; while all 
the splendor rising in prospective vision 
fades and dwindles into a routine busi- 
ness meeting. The immense sum that 
was to be expended for Islamite display 
and revel is now thought liable to be 
needed for war purposes, while railroads, 
are expected to be rather too busy for 
nonsense, and, moreover, the "typical 
Shriners' convention" would not assem- 
ble before many nobles due to attend 
would be privates. Thousands were to 
have gathered, and various haunts in 
Milwaukee must suffer a dreadful loss 
through the failure of a spendthrift con- 
vention. 



BREAD ON THE WATERS. 

The Mystic Order of Veiled Prophets 
of the Enchanted Realm held their an- 
nual convention in Washington, D. C, in 
June. 

This side degree is supposed to be for 
Master Masons what the Shrine is for 
Knights Templar and 32d degree Scot- 
tish Rite Masons, and is often spoken of 
as the ''playground" of the Blue Lodge. 
The membership is said to be 100,000. 
It was organized in 1889 at Hamilton, 
New York, by a coterie of Master Ma- 
sons who, after the "dignified" work of 
the lodge, felt they needed an associa- 
tion of good fellowship where they might 
relax and have "innocent enjoyment." 

Because of the war the grder this year 
has dispensed with the "usual festivities" 
which accompany the annual conven- 
tions, and the amount usually spent in 
"pure amusement" is to be devoted to 
the Red Cross and to the purchase of 
Liberty Bonds. As the whole organiza- 
tion is for amusement and as the "pure" 
part has been dispensed with to help in 
the war, why did they not omit the other 
part of their amusement — by whatever 
name they call it — pass thdr convention 
and thus put thousands of dollars more 
where it is really needed? But we sup- 
pose the omission of the "])ure" amuse- 
ments is quite enough to secure free ad- 
vertising in the press throughout the 
country, and will prove to be a good in- 
vestment after all. 



j^etog of 0m Worfe. 

President Charles A. Blanchard of 
Wheaton College addressed the students 
.of the Northern Baptist Theological 
Seminary in Chicago on June 15th ult. 
and in .the course of his remarks spoke 
in his usual way of the unchristian char- 
acter of organized secrecy represented by 
the Lodge. 

He was followed by Rev. Johnstone 
Myers, a prominent Baptist clergyman 
of this city, who, after telling of the 
high regard he holds for President 
Blanchard, said that he disagreed with 
him in his estimate of the Lodge ; that 
he had joined a number of them, and 
that he thought they were a good thing 
for the ministry to belong to. 

Dr. Myers was followed by Rev. John 
M.-Dean, the president of the Seminary, 
who stated that he fully agreed with Dr. 
Blanchard, and that, if the young men 
about to graduate wished to have a spir- 
itual ministry, they would have to keep 
clear of secret societies. 



TESTIMONY OF MRS. ALICE E. RAN- 
DLE. 

New Orleans, La., May 26, 19 17. 

Dear Cynosure: 

My reasons for renouncing secret so- 
cieties are as follows : 

I left the Good Samaritans because I 
found that their teachings were not 
wholly in keeping with God's Word, as 
they pretended they were. If their works 
were all of God it would not be neces- 
sary to show a newly initiated member a 
skeleton with the warning that if he or 
she "talked too much" they would "meet 
a similar fate." From the time that I 
was initiated I felt that I had committed 
a sin, so I remained away until my name 
was dropped from the roll. 

The Tabernacle, and Eastern Star 
were given up because the more degrees 
I took the more I was reminded of that 
commandment which says "Thou shalt 
not make unto thee any graven image or 
any likeness of anything that is in heaven 
above or in the earth beneath." Now, 
when it came to wicked men impersonat- 
ing Moses and Elijah and unsaved 
women impersonating Ruth, Esther. 
Jephthah's daughter, and others, I could 



92 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



but call it sacrilegious and I knew that 
God was not pleased with my being one 
of a number who pretended to "cross 
Jordan on dry ground," so I renounced 
it once for all. 

A few Sunday nights ago I was in- 
vited by the president of one of our mis- 
sion bands to address the congregation 
following the sermon, but when I ar- 
rived at the church I found that the 
service had been given over to the 
Knights of Pythias, although both the 
pastor and one of the deacons had pre- 
viously agreed that I should speak. The 
other deacon, who is a strong Knight of 
Pythias, made me sit down in the begin- 
ning of my speech and said that I might 
speak at some other time, but not then, 
as he would not have his invited guests 
insulted. I was very sorry that I had no 
tracts to give out at the time. 

Of course, these things are discourag- 
ing, but I am going on "just the same. 
.Yours for Jesus, 

Alice E. Randle. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

RE\\ W. B. STODDARD. 

I am writing from Ephrata, Pennsyl- 
vania, one of the garden spots of our 
country. I find more opportunities for 
meetings than I can attend to. On my 
way from Washington I spoke in the 
Free Mejhodist church, Baltimore, 
Maryland, and the Mennonite Mission at 
Columbia, Pennsylvania. My good 
friend. Prof. D. M. Wanger, opened the 
way for a brief address to about five 
hundred young people who gathered to 
practice music under his leadership at 
what is known as the Groffsdale Men- 
nonite church, Saturday evening. The 
music was inspiring. Yesterday I spoke to 
large audiences in Churches of the Breth- 
ren at Bareville, and Ephrata, Penn- 
sylvania, and tonight my appointment is 
in the Church of the Brethren at Me- 
chanics Grove, near Quarryville. To- 
morrow evening, the Lord willing, I will 
speak again at Bareville. As I have 
spoken in all these churches in years 
past, it is gratifying to find such a grow- 
ing interest and cordial welcome. 

After my report from Freeport, Illi- 
nois, last month it was my privilege to 
address a fine congregation of young 
people in what is known as the Holland 



church, German A^alley, Illinois. Upon 
returning to Chicago, I brought a mes- 
sage of greeting to friends in the Classis 
of Illinois of the Christian Reformed 
church, meeting in Domine Borgman's 
church. A trip to Glenview, Illinois, 
gave opportunity for addresses in the 
school house and Lutheran church, and 
to secure a large list of Cynosure read- 
ers. Rev. H. W. Wehrs and his young 
people gave splendid help. 

On the Sabbath, May 27th, I was per 
mitted to speak in the Halsted Street 
(Chicago) Mission of the Brethren in 
Christ in the morning and in the Sixty- 
second Street Reformed Church in the 
evening. 

Our Annual Meeting and Convention, 
on the day following, brought the in- 
spiration and help that it always does. 
It was especially gratifying to see the 
large congregation that gathered for the 
concluding service. Rev. Mr. Heemstra's 
support was most generous and kind. 

On my return trip to Washington I 
passed through western Indiana, where 
I noted the destruction wrought by a re- 
cent storm. At Indianapolis, Indiana, I 
learned of some interested in our work. 
I can not mention all the things that hap- 
pened during my brief stay at home. 
The gathering of the Confederate Vet- 
erans seemed strange. The blue and the 
gray have met many times fraternally 
since the close of their unfortunate 
struggle, but this time the grays were in 
the lead and the Confederate flags min- 
gled with the Stars and Stripes. The 
Washington Star stated that the rebel 
yell was frequently given as President 
Wilson addressed the Confederate vet- 
erans. The float in the parade read 
"The South and the North ; General Lee 
and General Grant." How human nature 
will assert itself when it has the chance ! 
It reminds me of the whipped rooster 
that begins to crow when far enough 
from his antagonist to make it safe. 

I recently visited Oakton, Manassas, 
Nokesville, and Alexandria, Virginia, 
and secured support in our work. I also 
preached for the Progressive Brethren 
and spoke in the Friends meeting while 
in Washington. Altogether, I have had 
a very busy month. These are strenuous 
times. The world moves fast, and shall 



July. 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYXOSURE 



93 



those who love Christ and wish the right 
to prevail, move slowly ? (jod forbid ! 
"Let us work while it is dav." 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Rawlinson, Ark., June ii, 1917. 

I am now working down in the basin 
or delta region of the Mississippi river, in 
what is known as the black belt — that is, 
none but colored people live here. They 
are all farmers and a good many own 
their own homes. 

I wrote my last letter from Forrest 
City, where we held services for two 
weeks, teaching and admonishing the 
people. We are past our fifty-second year 
from slavery and have done very well, 
considering the chances we have had to 
learn. \\c have but ^'ery few among 
us now that cannot read a little, but we 
have no real knowledge of God. The 
professors of our schools and the most 
learned ministers we have, with a few 
exceptions, get up new lodges to rob 
these people. They take the Word of 
God and put a part of it in some kind 
of ritual and have a good orator go out 
in the rural districts and talk up this 
lodge. Soon a third of the people will 
be in his money trap. Some big preach- 
er will join it and will preach annual ser- 
mons for this lodge, and then nearly' all 
of his members are drawn into it. 

The Jugamo Council. 
They have a new lodge in Forrest 
City gotten up by one of the professors 
at the high school. It is called the 
Jugamo Lodge or Council. Thev have 
a wooden yoke and in their initiation 
they use the verses found in ^latthew 
1 1 128-30. They take a bad woman and 
a good woman and put that yoke on 
them, just like you see oxen yoked to- 
gether, then thev say to them, ''Come 
unto me. all ye that labor and are heavy 
laden, and I will give you rest. Take un- 
yoke upon you, and learn of me ; for I 
am meek and lowly in heart ; and ye 
shall find rest unto your souls. For un- 
yoke is easy and mv burden is light." 
Xow, dear readers of the Cynosure, did 
vou ever hear of such blasphemy? A 
liar putting himself in Christ's stead and 
telling the people that they will find rest 
under his little wooden yoke — a yoke of 
graft to get money for himself. Then 



some pastor whom God sent to look after 
the souls of men will take this same text 
and preach an "annual sermon" on it to 
this mixture of church members and sin- 
ners, gamblers, good women and bad 
women, and what not, and then you will 
hear the poor, ignorant women and men 
saying, 'T'm going to join dem Jugamoes ; 
dey will take care of me when I'm sick 
and bury me when I die." 

Well, the Lord let me into their secrets 
while I was at Forrest City. I said to 
the people that their lodge is a child of 
Masonry, for all the little harlots are 
daughters of the whore who has made 
the earth drunk with her fornication 
(Rev. 19:2). This is none other than 
the Great "Babylon, the ^lother of Har- 
lots" (Rev. 17:5). Babylon is falling 
and God is calling his people out (Rev. 
18:2-3). When the Jugamoes heard me 
telling the secret of the Jugamo yoke 
they said, "A\'ho told that woman about 
our yoke?" The little Methodist sister 
with whom I stayed said to me, "Sister 
Roberson, where did you get the secret 
of our yoke ? I belong to the Jugamo 
Council and I had never even thought 
about how sinful it is to play with God's 
\\'ord as w-e do. You are right ; we have 
been led astray by our preachers. They 
are nearly all tied up in the lodges with 
us." I gave her several tracts to read 
and she asked me to pray for her that 
God would help her to get out of the 
snare of the Devil. 

While at Forrest City the Lord came 
upon the meetings in power. He led me 
to tell the ]\Iasons about their secrets and 
they opened their eyes. I told them in 
such a quiet, humble way that they did 
not get angry. One brother, who \yas 
angry because a sinner got converted and 
saved from the lodge, said to the pastor 
of the church where we held the serv- 
ices. "Don't you think that woman is 
saying too much about our lodges?" The 
pastor answered. "Xo, she has not said 
enouo:h against them. I wish she would 
stay here all year — until all of God's peo- 
ple come out of them." ^Nlany there saw 
the sin of secret societies. 

A\'e next went to ^Mariana. Arkansas. 
The Devil got so angry after I had sold 
"Freemasonry at a Glance'' that he sent 
four leading pastors of churches of the 
town to wait on me. Thev came in and 



94 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



July, 1917 



sat back in the rear of the church. The 
Lord came in such power in his Spirit 
through his weak handmaid that one of 
the ministers was dumfounded. I did 
not know they were ministers until three 
days afterwards, when one of the lead- 
ing physicians of the town told me that 
a brother who had purchased one of the 
little pamphlets was met by a leading 
]\Iason, who said, ''You give me that 
book. I sent a committee of our lead- 
ing pastors down there to see about that 
woman exposing our secrets." The 
brother gave him a tract, but kept his 
book. I said, ''The poor preachers ought 
to have been trying to save people from 
their sins instead of worrying about me.'' 
They were trying to protect their idol 
god and the Lord let me cry against their 
false worship and the preachers, like 
Amaziah, in Amos 7:10, came to see 
about it. The Spirit, through me, gave 
the same answer that Amos did (Amos 
7:14-17). I told them that I never was 
a member of a secret order in my life, 
and yet God had laid it upon me to cry 
against its idolatrous worship. 

God help the preachers in this country, 
both white and colored. They have let 
the sword come on us because they did 
not cry out against sin. God help us all 
to pray for our young men who are going 
to the battlefield. We negroes in the 
South are not enemies of this govern- 
ment. Such reports are lies told about 
us. We are not rebels. My people have 
never thought of stealing rich people's 
children to get money. We are loyal 
citizens of this country, and we would be 
better people if we had more holy men 
in the pulpit (Titus i :8). That is what 
this whole world needs. 

Yours for Jesus. 

Lizzie W. Roberson. 



REPORT OF SOUTHERN AGENT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

Since my last letter I have held three 
Ministers and Deacons Institutes as fol- 
lows : New Hope Baptist church, Rev. 
E. L. Howard, pastor, Gretna, Louisi- 
ana ; Branch Bell Baptist church. Rev. 
R. Watson, pastor, and St. Charles Bap- 
tist church, Rev. C. J. Lewis, pastor. 
New Orleans, Louisiana. I am also en- 
gaged this week in a series of revivals. 
I find many doors open for work but the 



conributions often barely pay my ex- 
penses. Thus you can see how difficult 
my work is. 

There are a few ardent secret lodge 
worshippers in Pass Christian, Missis- 
sippi, who have made many false ac- 
cusations against me in their endeavors 
to stir up strife and create confusion 
among the membership of my church. 
Two of the chiefs of these false accusers 
are Baptist preachers, one of them is a 
pastor. The community, however, knows 
them and has paid little attention to their 
accusations, but since oath-bound secret 
societies unequally yoke together the 
good and bad under obligations to pro- 
tect one another, it is hard to say what 
the result will be. Praise God, I am 
standing firmly on the Lord's side and 
shall contend for the faith once deliv- 
ered to his saints. 

Several very flattering inducements 
have been ofi^ered to me if I will cease 
writing for the Cynosure and circulating 
it among the people. An influential man 
and woman said to me some days ago : 
"Dr. Davidson, it is a pity that such a 
good Christian man and good preacher 
of the Gospel as you are can't get a good 
church in this city. You could do so 
much for the betterment of your people 
and the purifying of the church, but your 
stern opposition to secret societies will 
always work against you being called to 
any leading church here. We can't see 
how you can afford to stand so firmly 
against your own interest. H you don't 
want to join the lodges, stay out, but 
don't say anything against them, for it 
don't do any good, and it only injures 
you personally and keeps you out of a 
good church." 

I replied : "My friends, I believe you 
are both good and sincere people. For 
more than twenty-five years you have 
been my friends, and I believe you have 
my welfare at heart ; but if it is better to 
obey you and disobey God, judge ye. 
I am told in God's Word to 'have no fel- 
lowship with the unfruitful works of 
darkness, but rather to reprove them.' 
(Eph. 5:11.) Again Jesus said, *H ye 
love me, keep my commandments,' and 
in n Cor. 6:14-18 we have this com- 
mandment to come out from among them 
and be separate. Jesus said again, 'For 
what is a man profited, if he shall gain 



July, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 



the whole world, &nd lose his own soul?' 
I know that God has called me to preach 
against secret societies and all forms of 
sin ; therefore I can not endanger my 
soul by disobeying him. I would rather 
suffer afflictions in this world for Christ's 
sake and enjoy heaven than to receive 
honor and comfort in this world and be 
cast down to hell. All of these who op- 
pose the truth and persecute me for the 
gospel's sake will see by and by that 1 
have been a faithful witness, and thcti 
my soul shall rejoice.'' 



We copy the following testimony to 
the work of "Lizzie Woods" from a let- 
ter written by Harold C. Young, 733 
Everett avenue, Kansas City, Kansas, 
to a religious periodical, ''The Whole 
Truth/' 

"We thank and praise God for send- 
ing us Mrs. Lizzie Roberson of Argenta, 
Ark., a few weeks ago. The Word of 
the Lord was magnified. The Lord en- 
abled her to teach some wonderful les- 
sons, and many of the saints were made 
to see and to understand what was their 
duty as becometh saints. And indeed 
it is one thing to talk holiness and an- 
other to live it. The Scripture was 
made plain and the light of the truth 
caused many to rejoice. 

"Quite a number of the saints were 
tied up in lodges and secret orders, but 
after Mother Roberson taught them and 
showed them the Word of the Lord, 
many of them denounced the lodges and 
came out and are now contending for a 
full gospel ! Thank the Lord for Moth- 
er Roberson, and we are asking the 
Lord to send her to us again soon." 



Elkhart, Ind. 
I am glad for the Cynosure. How 
nice it would be if ajl churches were tes- 
tifying churches instead of partakers of 
other men's sins in the lodges. I have to 
suffer as a pastor because of the attitude 
of the United Brethren in Christ church 
on the lodge question, but I am willing to 
for Jesus' sake. 

(Rev.) Samuel Foltz. 



ris, $5; Prof. R. L. Park, $0; Miss Ellen M. 
Manter, $5; W. I. Phillips, $6; Mrs. Jeanette 
Thompson, $3 ; C. F. Minneman, $0 ; Mrs. C. 
A. Johnson, $2.50; Rev. W. G. Waddle, $2; 
Dr. J. Ball, $5 ; John Purdy, $2 ; Mrs. Georgia 
A. Brown, $25 ; G. V. Dingleberry, $0.50 ; Mrs. 
J, E. Phillips, $5; Miss N. S. Coleman, $9.06; 
Rev. E. H. Krominga, $1 ; George W. Shealey, 
$10; Mrs. Hedda Worcester, $3; Miss Eliza 
F. Potter, $2; Rev. P. Beck, $1; Mrs. C. 
Hillegonds, $5; Rev. A. H. Brat, $1; Mrs. 
Lizzie Woods Roberson, $1 ; Frank Holder- 
man, $3; Mrs. M. E. McKee, $4; N. P. 
Bourne, $6.50; Dr. L. Hacault, $4; collection 
at Annual Meeting, 1st Reformed Church, 
Chicago, $36.81 ; Free Methodist Church, Glen 
Ellyn, Illinois, $4.01. 

The following individuals have taken out 
Sustaining Memberships at $2 each : H. H. 
Ritter, Bessie E. Newell, E. L. Vogel, F. L. 
McClellan, Mrs._ R. H. Stough, G. E. Shoe- 
maker, and Christian H. ]\Iusselman. 

Contributions were received from Reformed 
Presbyterian churches and societies as follows: 
Young Peoples' Society, Cincinnati, O., $5 ; 
Apache, Oklahoma, $5 ; Young Peoples' So- 
ciety, First church, Topeka, Kansas, $10 ; 
Sharon, Iowa, and I. A. Carrithers. Morning 
Sun, Iowa, $7.60, and Eighth Street church, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., $2. 

The following contributions were received 
from Christian Reformed churches and so- 
cieties : Young Ladies' Society, 1st church, 
Chicago, $5; Young Peoples' Society, Allen- 
dale, Mich., $5; Eastern Ave. church. Grand 
Rapids, Mich., $50; 1st church, Paterson, N. 
J., $20; Comstock, Mich., $3.75'; Neland Ave., 
Grand Rapids, $5 : 3rd church, Zeeland, Mich., 
$1.35; Sheldon, la'., $15.58; Volga, S. D., $9.04; 
Hope Ave., Passaic, N. J., $14; Alpine Ave., 
Grand Rapids, Mich., $20.87; Burton Heights, 
Grand Rapids, Alich., $7.96; 2nd church, 
Muskegon, Mich., $15 ; Young Peoples' So- 
ciety, Lucas, Mich., $5 ; Young Peoples' So- 
ciety, Prosper, Mich., $5; 1st church, Fremont, 
Mich., $31.79; Ladies' Aid, 1st church, Muske- 
gon, Mich., $5, and Spring Lake, Mich., $5. 

We also have received from J. J. Van 
Wagnen for the Cvnosure Endowment Fund, 
$25; from A. P. Meyer for Tract Fund, $1, 
and from the estate of G. S. Hitchcock, $5. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Since our last report the following contri- 
butions have been received : 

Mary C. Fleming, $2; Mrs. Mary P. Mor- 



Contributions for the year ending April 30th, 
1917. paid through Eastern Secretary W. B. 
Stoddard, were as follows : 

From following Churches of the Brethren : 
Peru. Indiana, $^5.65; Mt. ^lorris. 111., $4.33; 
Lebanon, Pa., $4.95; Beech Grove, O., $6; 
Bunkertown, Pa., $1.68; Richfield, Pa.. $3.38; 
Morrellville. Pa., $1.57; Akron. O., $4.37, and 
church near Johnstown, Pa.. $2.50. 

From the following Christian Reformed 
churches: Midland Park, N. J., $26.22: 4th, 
Paterson, N. J., $15; Prospect St.. Passaic, 
N. J., $14.80 : 14th St., Chicago, $2.64, and 
Third, of Chicago. $14. 

From the following IMennonite churches : 
18th St., Chicago, $2 ; church near Freeport, 
111., $6.58: Leetonia, O., $4.37;- Wadsworth, 
O., $11; Delaware, Pa., $1.08; Lost Creek, 



96 



HRISTIAX CYXOSURE 



July, 19i; 



Pa., $2.70 : Lauvers, Pa.. $2.88 : Belleville, Pa., 
$1.03; Allenville. Pa.. $2.66; Mattawana, Pa., 
$3.1o: Berne, Ind., $10.40; church near Dal- 
ton. O., $3 ; and Shiremantown, Pa., $3.74. 

From the following Free Methodist church- 
es : Columbus. O., $2.20 ; .1st church, Brooklyn, 
X. Y., $2; Xew Kensington, Pa., $-3.86; West 
End. Pittsburgh. Pa.. . $4.50 ; Vandergift 
Heights, Pa., $2.0o : Alexandria, Va., $110; 
Elhvood City, Pa.. $3.40; Akron, Ohio, $1.30, 
and Hooper St.. Brooklyn. X. Y.. $1.51. 

From the following Lutheran churches : 
Freeport, 111.. $6.58; Rockford. III. $6.43; 
Glenview. 111.. $13; Elgin. 111., $7.67; Blue 
Island. 111., $7.65; Evangelical, South Bend, 
Ind.. $8.57; ]\Iansfield, O., $5, and Paterson, 
X. J., S5.55. 

From tlie following miscellaneous churches 
and institutions : Faith Tabernacle, Philadel- 
phia. Pa.. $10; Radical United' Brethren, 
Chambersburg. Pa., $3.86 ; Pennsylvania State 
Convention, Pittsburgh, Pa., $20 ; First Re- 
formed Presbyterian, Philadelphia, Pa., $10 ; 
Pentecostal Mission, Richmond Hill, X. Y., 
81 ; Springfield Gardens Holiness church, Long 
Island, X'. Y., $1.44; Xew York-X'ew Jersey 
Convention, Corona, L, I.. X. Y., $10 ; Mis- 
sionary Training School, X^'yack, X. Y., $4; 
Goodville schoolhouse meeting, Goodville, Pa., 
$0.38: -Wesleyan Methodist Church, Canton, 
O.. $2.47 ; Ohio State Association. Canton, O., 
$15; First Reformed Church, Chicago, 111., 
$6.50. and the Wesleyan Methodist Confer- 
ence, Greer, O., $5. 

From the following persons : Jos. F. ^Ic- 
Kee, $5 ; Christian H. Musselman, $2 ; Elder 
Enos Hess, $1 : ]Mrs. Agnes Schoenhut, $10 ; 
T. ^I. Stewart. $2 ; G. E. Shoemaker. $1, and 
^Ir. and ^Irs. X. L. Johnson. $H). 



Contributions for the }'ear ending April 
30th. 1917, paid through Field Agent ]Mead 
A. Kelsey, were as follows : 

From, the following i:^riends' churches: 
Westfield, Illinois, $8.79; Somerset, :\Iass., 
$10: Fountain Citv, Ind., $3.07; Dublin, Ind., 
S2: Damascus, Ohio, $1.65; Beloit, Ohio, $5; 
Ohio Yearly Meeting, Damascus. O., $25 ; 
Columbus, b.. $0.62 ; East Goshen Friends, 
Beloit, O., $1.81; Marengo, O., $4.04; Card- 
ington, O., $1.77 ; ^It. Gilead, O., $4.01 : Xor- 
walk, O., $4.75 ; First church, Cleveland. O., 
$6.50 : Evangelistic Board of Cleveland, O., 
$5: Ypsilanti, ^lichigan, $3.71; Tecumseh, 
Mich., $2.03; Adrian, Mich., $2; Highland 
Ave., Columbus, O.. $1.20; Fairmont, Ind., $3; 
Monroe, Ind., $3.18 ; X'ew England Yearly 
Meeting of Friends, $10. 

From the following Churches of the 
Brethren : South Bend, Ind., $2.85 ; Salamonie, 
$4.79, and Loan Creek, $3, of Huntington, 
Ind. ; Markle, Ind.. $1.82 ; Sidney, Ind., $2.90 ; 
X. Manchester, Ind., $4.50; Silver Lake, Ind., 
$3.45; Mission, South Bend. Ind., $1.52. 

From the following Christian Reformed 
churches : X'ew Era, Mich.. $5 ; Spring Lake. 
Mich., $4.40; Sioux Center, la., $11.05; Ham- 
mond, Ind.. $10: Goshen, Ind.. $1.88. 

From the following Reformed churches : 



Rock Valley, la., $10.61; Hull, la., $10.04; 
'Sanborn. la., $3.19 ; Orange City, la., $17.58. 

From the follq\ving miscellaneous churches 
and institutions : Associate Presbyterian, Al- 
lua, Iowa, $3; Iowa Christian Association, 
$30 ; Christian School, Perkins, la., 
$3.12 ; Bible Training School, Ft. Wa3-ne, 
Ind., $2.21 ; ^lissionary Church, Woodburn, 
Ind., $5.58 ; Temperance Societv. Berne, Ind., 
$10 ; Wesleyan ^lethodist. Waba'sh. Ind., $2.50 ; 
Evangelical Association. Linn Grove, 111., 
$2.20 ; Church of the Xazarene, Georgetown, 
111., $2.86; Olivet College, Olivet, 111., $1.60; 
Christian, Auburn, III. $1.91; United Presby- 
terian, Sparta, III, $1.39 ; Illinois State Con- 
ference, Cerro Gordo, III, $28.82 ; Boys' Band, 
^Manchester College, X. Manchester, Ind., 
$2.28; South ^^lichigan W^eslevan Conference, 
Hastings, ^lich., $12.12. 

From the folowing Free Methodist church- 
es : Glen Ellyn. Ill, $2.56; Greenville. III. 
$2.36 ; Areola, III, $2.96. 

From the following Mennonite churches : 
Grabill, Ind., $6.30; Berne, Ind., $7: Goshen, 
Ind., $2.57. 

From the following persons : Joshua L. 
Bailv, $20; Asa S. Wing, SiU : Wm. Evans, 
$5: Wm. S. Yarnall. $5; Sarah Swift, $25; 
Charles E. Hoag, $10 ; Hannah J. Bailey, $10 ; 
Rev. C. G. Sterling, $1; M. A. Kelsey, $5; C. 
\'irginia Sellew, $5; the ^Misses Burson, $1 ; 
Abram :\Iorris, $1 ; Peter Amstutz, $0.50 : 
Ralph Earle, $2; Henrv DeBlois. $1: Filer 
Burns, $3; Rev. A. S. Kimber. $2: A. Peters, 
$5. 



Contributions for the year ending April 30th, 
1917, paid through Southern Agent F. J. 
Davidson, were as follows : 

From the following Baptist churches : Aus- 
terlitz St.. $4.13; Progressive, $1.30; Second 
Zion, $0.60; Amozion, $3.50; Tulane, $3.05; 
Mt. Herman, $6.80; Pilgrim. $0.15; First, 
$2.47; St. Marks IV., $12.01; Sixth, $2.10; St. 
John, $2.25; Plvmouth Rock, $1.20; Second, 
$1.90; Bell Branch, $0.60; Saunders, $0.25 ;• 
Oriental. $0.55 ; Libertv, $0.35 ; Blount Salem, 
$1.05; Central, $1; Israelite, $0.50: Triumph, 
$0.15: St. Peter, $0.50, and Fourth, $1; of 
Xew Orleans, La., W'hite Castle, La., $0.35; 
Dorcvville, La., $0.30; St. James, La.. $1.50; 
St. Patrick, La., $1.25; ^IcDonoghville, La., 
$0.15; Beautiful Zion, $1.25, and Mt. Olive, 
$1 : of Algiers, La. ; Moonshine, La., $0.35 ; 
Plaquemine. La., $2 ; Burton, La., $1.35 ; South- 
western, $1.25. and Battle Ground, $1.25; of 
Arabi, La.; Carrollton,' La., $0.50: ^vlareaux- 
ville. La.. $0.49: First, $3.25, and Holiness, 
$0.75; of Lewisburv, La.; Mandeville, La., $1 ; 
First, $17.50 and Second. $0.60, of Pass Chris- 
tian, ]\Iiss. ; Kenner, La., $1, and Harvev, 
La., $1.30. 

From the following ^lethodist churches ; 
St. James, $0.65; Bethel, $0.25; of Xew Or- 
leans, La. 

From the following persons : Rev. and 
Mrs. S. C. Kimball, $2; Wheaton College 
Church. Ill, $15; H. A. Fischer, Jr., $2; a 
young lady, $2: W. I. Phillips, $15; Xational 
Christian Association, $10. 



SPECIAL BARGAINS 

Reductions on Antisecret 
Books 



SEARCH LIGHTS ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 



Our Inventory shows about forty diflFcr- 
ent kinds of books and pamphlets — odds 
and ends — which, on account of the limited 
supply, it will not pay to advertise in our 
general catalog?. 

While they last we offer them at reduced 
prices. Some are in perfect condition, 
while others are shopworn or slightly dam- 
aged. We have made our prices according- 
ly and will give you the best copies we can. 

This list offers a fine selection of litera- 
ture on reform lines and after our supply is 
gone, much of it will be impossible to ob- 
tain. 

Terms — Cash with order. If you order 
something which has been sold out we will 
refund your overpayment unless you au- 
thorize us to substitute at our discretion. 
This is distinctly a cash proposition; do not 
order C. O. D. or on approval. 

Cynosure Subscribers, new or old, who 
pay their subscription one year in advance 
and send 50 cents additional ($1.50 in all), 
or any old subscriber who sends in a new 
yearly subscription with SO cents additional 
($1.50 in all), may select one dollar's worth 
of the books in this list, which will be sent 
postpaid to one address. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION, 
850 W. Madison St.. Chicago, 111. 



SCRAP BOOKS 

Containing 31 "Cynosure" (old aeries) tracts. 
A valuable collection of antllodge literature. 
Paper cover, price, 20 cents. 

LIGHT ON FREEMASONRY, APPE'I- 
DIX TO 

By Eld. David Bernard, who was the flr«rt 
Mason to publicly secede following the abduc- 
tion of Wm. Morgan, Paper cover, pries, tO 
cents. 

FIVE IN ONE 

Morgan's Exposition; History of the Abdus- 
tion of Morgan; Confession of the Abduction of 
Morgan, by Valance; Bernard's Reminiscence* 
of Morgan Times; and Oaths and Penalties of 
33 Degrees of Freemasonry, bound together. 
Cloth cover, price, 50 cents. 

PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
THE SIXTH ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION, N. C. A. 

At Syracuse, N. T., 3874. Addresses by Rev. 

B. T, Roberts, Chas. D. Green (Mayor of Ba- 
tavia, N. Y., during Morgan excitement), Pres. 

C. A. Blanchard. Rev. D. P. Rathbun, Rev. J. 
R. Baird (ex -Mason), Mrs. C. B, Miller, Elder 
David Bernard, and others. Paper cover, 150 
pages, price, 20 cents. 

LETTERS ON FREEMASONRY TO 
THE FRATERNITY 

By Eld. John G. Stearns. Paper cover, 182 
pages, price, 10 cents. 



REMINISCENCES OF MORGAN TIMES. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 10 cents. 



REVIEW OF TWO MASONIC AD- 
DRESSES 
By Eld. John G. Steams. Paper cover, 72 
pages, price, 5 cents. 



RITUALS. 



DANGER SIGNALS NO. 1 

Testimonies with portraits of Dr. J. M. Gray, 
Joseph Coolc, Dr. A. J. Gordan, Mrs. Hannah 
J. Bailey, and others. Cloth cover, price, 15 
cents. 



PATRIARCHS MILITANT 

Adopted by Sov. Grand Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd-Fellows, 1885. Copy of charge 
book with military diagrams, etc. Paper cover, 
25 cents. 



DANGER SIGNALS NO. 2 

Testimonies with portraits of Wendell Phil- 
lips, Chas. Francis Adams, Frances E. Wlllard. 
Rev. James P. Stoddard, and others. Cloth 
<;over, price, 15 cents. 



GOOD TEMPLARISM 

An exposition of the Lodge, Temple, and 
Council degrees. Paper cover, 25 cents. 



KNIGHTS OF LABOR 

An exposition of the order. Including un- 
written work. Paper cover, 20 cents. 



KNIGHTS OF THE ORIENT 

Ritual of the Ancient Order of th* Orient; 
side degree. Paper cover, 25 cents 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES ON SE- 
CRET SOCIETIES 

By Rev. W. P. McNary. Rev, James Williams. 
Pres. J. Blanchard, Pres. H. H. George, and 
others. Fourteen addresses bound together. 

Cloth cover, price, 60 cents. 



THE CARPENTER BOOKLET 

Containing the testimonies of Deacon Phllo 
Carpenter; teachers and offlcers In Americaa 
Missionary Association: Ministers; offlcers of 
Colleges, etc. Paper cover, price, 10 cents. 



HOLDEN WITH CORDS 

By E. E. Flagg. A thrilling narrative which 
will hold the Interest of adults and children 
and at the same time give them the true ac- 
count of the Morgan times. The covers of eoxie 
have been damaged by water, but the pages are 
in good condition. 384 pages; cloth cover, price, 
35 cents; paper cover, 25 cents. 

BROKEN SEAL, THE 

Personal reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan. By Samuel D. Greene, a 
member with William Morgan of the Masonic 
lodge at Batavia, N. Y. Mr. Greene became a 
famous antl-Masonlc lecturer and because of It 
suffered persecutions by the Masons. Paper 
cover, 304 pages, price, 25 cents. 

CONDEMNATION OF SECRET SO- 
CIETIES 
By Rev. L. V. Harrell (United Brethren). 
Paper covers, 3 cents. 

MYSTICAL LIFE, THE, AND HOUSE- 
TOP PROCLAMATIONS 

A compilation of Methodist et al. tejErtlmonles 
with portraits of prominent men: Dr. J. M. 
Buckley, John Wesley, A. T. Jennings, Wood- 
ruff Post, and many others. A valuable book- 
let. Paper cover, 88 pages, price, 15 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY 

Its relation to Civil Government and the 
Christian Religion, by Pres. J. Blanchard. The 
anchristian, antirepublican and despotic charac- 
ter of Freemasonry proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. Paper cover, 16 pages, 
price, 6 cents. 

MISCELLANEOUS 



HELPS TO BIBLE STUDY 

With practical notes on the books of Scrip- 
ture; Methods of Study: Rules of Interpretation; 
Types and Symbols; Analysis of the Books of 
the Bible. Cloth cover, 196 pages, price, 15 
.:ent». 

SECRET INSTRUCTIONS OF THE 

JESUITS and CONFESSIONS TO 

A PRIEST 

Both books are by Thomas E. Leyden, Evan- 
gelist, a converted Catholic. A warning to 
America. Contains the Jesuit oath. Paper cov- 
ers; price for the two books, 30 cents. 

DIVORCE AND REMARRIAGE 

By Elder I. J. Rosenberger. An appeal lor 
reform in our marriage laws. Paper cover, 48 
pages, price, 5 cents. 



GURY'S DOCTRINES OF THE 

JESUITS— EngUsh Edition. 

Translated from the Latin Into the French by 
M. Paul Bert, member of the Chamber of Dep- 
uties and Professor at the Faculty of Sciences. 
"The Doctrines of the Jesailts, translated Into 
French by M. Paul Bert, caused the expulsion 
of the Jesuits from France." — Lequere. Paper 
cover; 612 pages, price, 50 cents. 

THE OPEN CONFESSION. 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address steno- 
graphically reported for the National Christian 
Association at its Annual Meeting, April 8, 1910. 

The relation of the Christian, and especially 
the Christian minister, to the secret oath-bound 
lodge. 

A Personal Testimony. — Three things that 
kept Dr. Gray from joining a lodge. 

Attacking Principles, Not Persons. — This Is 
within our guaranteed constitutional rights and 
is of fundamental importance. 

Describing a Mighty Adversary. — Not merely 
an evil influence, but a personal spiritual being 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beings like 
himself. And what this Enemy can do and is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System. — Showing 
that it is truly contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 5 cents a 
copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS* TRACTS. 

These consist of 20 different tracts, envelope 
size, of from four to sixteen pages each. Some 
of them are: Why I Left the Rebekah Lodge. 
Col. Geo. R. Clark, seceder, on Why I Left th« 
Masons. Experience of Stephen Merritt, the 
Evangelist. Graciously Delivered from Seven 
Secret Societies. The Church and the Lodge. 
Baptist Testimonies. Lodge Religion. The 
"Good Man" Argument. Masonic Obligations. 
Catechism of Oddfellowship. Oddfellowship a 
Religious Institution. Why Do Men Remain 
Oddfellows? The Worship of Secret Societies 
Offered to Satan. Sketch of National Christian 
Association. Two Nights in a Lodge Room. 
The Secret Foe of the Sabbath. How to Save 
Christians from Lodges. Lodge Burial Services. 
Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
surance Lodges? Ethics of Marriage and Home 
Life. Washington, What Kind of a Freemason 
Was He? College Fraternities. Fraternities in 
Btate Schools. For Women Who Think — Wom- 
en s Lodges. The Patriot and the Lodge. 
Each, 2 cents; an assortment, 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. Madifton St CHICAGO, ILL. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

The author, Mr. B. M. Holt, was for many years a lodge member. He resigned his lodge- 
connection in all due form on account of scruples of conscience; he was not dropped on account 
of delinquency, but voluntarily resigned and received his regular "letter of dimission." 

The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World in particular, 
shows almost exclusively from quotations of prominent Woodmen, official publications, supply 
houses, and others, what the Woodmen teach and do, and points out wherein their teachings and 
practises disagree with Christian principles. The little booklet is sure to be of inestimable value 
in the hands of pastors and others that have occasion to warn a Christian brother against 
joining a lodge, and should be available also in persuading those who have already taken this 
step, to leave the lodge. 

The little paper-covered book comprises 72 pages, size 5x7%. It contains four illustrations of 
secret society paraphernalia. The list price is 25 cents, postpaid. 

Address NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 850 W. Madison St., Chicago 




Vol. L. 




CHICAGO, AUGUST, 1917 



Number 



H 



Cbe Crwe Reformer 

T>6 Stood upon m u^orM'$ broad threshold; wide 
the din of battle and of slanghf er rose ; 
l^e saw Sod standing upon the weaker side, 
tbat sank in sesmlmg Joss before its foes; 
Rlanv there were who made ha$te and sold 
Unto the cunning enemy their swords; 
Be scorned their gifts of fame, and power and gold, 
Hnd underneath their soft and flowery words 
i)eard the cold serpent hiss ; therefore he went 
TInd joined him to the weaker part* 
Tanatic named, and fool, yet well content 
$0 he could be the nearer to God's heart 
jUnd feel its solemn pulses sending blood 
through all the wide-spread veins of endless good. 

—Lowell. 



**l>e chose this path for thee: 
mhat need' St thou more? this sweeter truth to know: 
that all along the«e strange, bewildering ways, 
O'er rocky steeps, and where dark rivers flow, 
1)1$ loving arms shall bear thee all thy days : 
B few steps more, and thou thyself shalt see 
this path is best for thee." 




OFFICIAU OR&AN. 
10 CENTRA COPY 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN 
EJTABUJHED lebS 



AJJOCIATION 

1,00 AYEAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



JAMES EDWIN PHILLIPS 
Managing Editor. 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



, TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 
PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1,00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 
PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly aijthorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year 

BUSINESS LETTERS shouid be addn^ssed io 

Wni. !. Philips, (ien Sec.v.. at the abu^e ad- 
dress 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
at the Post OflELce at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
March 3^ 1875. 



CONTENTS 



The True Reformer, poem by James Rus- 
sell Lowell Cover 

Our Way Thro' Darkness Leads, poem by 
Horace Greeley 97 

Frat Gang Attacks Editor — Chicago Eve- 
ning Post 97 

Degree of Honor Seeks Free Advertising 98 

Masonic Stand Stirs Italy — Chicago Daily 
News 98 

Serbian Rebels Shot 98 

Acceptable Worship versus Lodge Wor- 
ship, by Rev. Martin L. Wagner 99 

*Elks Observe "Boys' Day" ....100 

Moose Properly Attached 100 

Serious Matter for Masonry — Toronto 

Freemason 100 

How a Baptist Minister Was Led Out of 
Masonry 101 

"The Case Against the Lodge," by Rev. 

M. A. Malcom 104 

Surrendered Lives 107 

Experience As a Granger, by Mrs. C A. 

Johnson 108 

Sufferers in Bible Lands by Rev. Mead A. 

Kelsey 109 

Book Notices 109 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 110 

Capitalizing Patriotism Ill 

Labor Union Events 112 



Editorial : 

Masonic Juggling 115 

1847— July 20th— 1917 115 

Eagle "Charity" 115 

Accredited Support Wanting 116 

News of Our Work: 

Tracts for Soldiers 118 

Covenanters Hold Conference on 

Lodges 118 

Cynosures Wanted • 119 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 93 

The Lion of the Tribe of Judah 119 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard '. . . 120 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 122 

Report of Southern Agent, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson .123 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

GENERAL OFFICERS. 
President Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president, Rev. John F. Fleemstra; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomas C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kit- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Lea- 
man, George Slager and Wm. M. Trap. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 31 18 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St, 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, EUendale, N. D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck, Grafton, Calif. 

Eld. G. B. Crockett, Dermott Ark. 



Vol. L, No. 4. 



CHICAGO 



August, 1917 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 


him: I 


spake 


openly 


to the 


world, 


and in 


secret 


have 1 


said nothii^g. | 


—Joh 


n 18:20 , 



OUR WAY THRO' DARKNESS 
LEADS. 

BY HORACE C.REELEY, IN 1 863. 

O God ! our way thro' darkness leads 

But thine is living light ; 
Teach us to feel that day succeeds 

To each slow wearing night. 
Make us to know, tho' pain and woe 

Beset our mortal lives, 
That ill at last in death lies low 

And only good survives. 

Too long the oppressor's iron heel 

The saintly brow has pressed; 
Too oft the tyrant's murderous steel 

Has pierced the guiltless breast. 
Yet in our souls the seed shall lie 

Till thou shalt bid it thrive. 
Of steadfast faith that wrong shall die 

And only right survive. 

We walk in shadow ; thickest walls 

Do man from man divide. 
Our brothers spurn our tenderest calls, 

Our holiest aims deride. 
Yet tho' fell craft wdiich fiendish thought 

Its subtle web contrives, 
Still falsehood's textures shrink to 
naught 

And only truth survives. « 

Wrath clouds our sky, war lifts on high 

His flag of crimson stain, 
Each n»nstrous birth o'erspreads tlie 
earth, 

In battle's gory train. 
Yet still, we trust in God the just. 

Still keep our faith alive, 
That 'neath thine eye all hate sliall die, 

And only love survive. 



FRAT GANG ATTACKS EDITOR. 



High School Editor Prepares to Make "Re- 
prisal." 

Reprisal. — The act of retorting to an enemy 
b\- inflicting suffering or death on a prisoner 
taken from him, in retaliation for an act of 
inhumanitv\ 



These being 



w-arlike times, war terms 
are creeping into every-day affairs. 
Hence, when a gang of Austin High 
School boys attacked Donald Abel, 19- 
years old, and several companions, and 
"beat 'em up," did they appeal to the 
police ? 

They did not. ''This is a case for in- 
dividual reprisal, not for the police," 
said young Abel. 

All the trouble came about because 
Abel, as editor of the 'Alaroon and 
White,'' the Austin High School paper, 
refused to recognize and grant patron- 
age to members of a certain high school 
fraternity. Now, under the rules of the 
Board of Education, high school fra- 
ternities in Chicago are taboo. Hence 
Aljel, who graduated from the high 
school last Friday, placed the ban on 
fraternity members wdio sought editorial 
positions on the paper. 

Returning home from the graduating 
exercises Friday night; it became known 
to-day, Abel and half a dozen of his com- 
panions were attacked by a mob of fel- 
low students, fraternity boys, numbering 
al)out 75, it was said. They gave a cred- 
ital)le account of themselves but Were 
outnumbered and received ' severe beat- 

Then came the forming of a "reprisal 
board," headed by Abel. It's said that 
manv of the frat bovs have 2:0 ne on va- 



98 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



cations, leaving suddenly and uncere- 
moniously. Others who remained at 
home don't go out nights — or any other 
time — alone. 

Said the Austin police : "We haven't 
seen a thing." — Chicago Even hi g Post, 
June 26, 19 1 7. 



DEGREE^ OF HONOR SEEKS FREE 
ADVERTISING. 

Georgia Notestine, Grand Recorder, 
recommends a need for a broader vision 
in lodge work. In view of this question 
she recommended the appointment of a 
civic committee in each lodge in the state 
to report at each lodge meeting. She 
asked that ministers be requested to 
preach sermons upon the uplifting influ- 
ence of civic betterment and through 
lodge work, the pulpits of the villages, 
tovs'ns and cities should ring with the 
town's duty to its citizens and civic bet- 
terment and civic righteousness ; that it 
would be a splendid advertisement for 
the Degree of Honor of Kansas. The 
recommendation was unanimously adopt- 
ed. — Fraternal Monitor, June i, 1917.. 



It is reported in the Masonic press 
that the French Masons have called a 
convention to meet in Paris, June 28, for 
the purpose of settling, if possible, the 
differences that have for some years 
separated English speaking and Latin 
^lasons. 



MASONIC STAND STIRS ITALY. 

[Copyright, 1917. by The Chicago Daily 
News Co.] 

Rome, Italy, July 17. — The general 
discontent provoked in Italy by the 
declaration and deliberations of the Ma- 
sonic heads in the Paris assembly are in- 
creased by a recent interview in the 
Temps with Lebey, head of the French 
lodges. Lebey's declarations as pub- 
lished in the Temps touch the most sensi- 
tive point of actual Italian politics. 

In referring to the proposal of the 
Masonic assembly in Paris that the fate 
of the unredeemed Italian provinces be 
decided by appeal to a plebiscite, Lebey 
now denies all statements of the Italian 
Masonic chiefs. Italian opinion consid- 
ers the decision of a plebiscite, obtained 
while the provinces are still subject to 



Austria, as unrepresentative of the real 
desire of the majority. The Jugo-Slav 
question, revived in a section of the 
French press, excites displeasure in Italy 
causing part of the Italian press to ob- 
serve that Italy never dreamed of dis- 
cussing the Alsace-Lorraine question. 
Organs of the Catholic party naturally 
pursue a vigorous antimasonic campaign. 
Ferrari Nathan, head of the Italian Free- 
masons, held responsible for the vexed 
Cjuestion of the Paris assembly proposal, 
is unwilling to resign, although his posi- 
tion is now untenable. — Chicago Daily 
News, July 17, 19 17. 



SERBIAN REBELS SHOT. 

Saloniki, June 27. — -Several executions 
took place in the outskirts of Saloniki 
to-day. Col. Dimitrievich, Maj. Vulo- 
vich and an Austro-Hungarian volunteer, 
Malobabach, concerned with many oth- 
ers in a conspiracy of a Serbian secret 
society to overthrow the present political 
regime of Serbia and substitute an oli- 
archic form of government, were shot. 
Many others implicated received long 
terms of imprisonment. — Chicago Trib- 
une. 



SOME TITLE! 

George Fleming Moore, Grand Com- 
mander of the "Supreme Council of the 
Inspectors General, Knights Command- 
ers of the Flouse of the Temple of Solo- 
mon of the Thirty-third Degree of the 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of 
Freemasonry for the Southern Jurisdic- 
tion of the United States of America." 



The Woodmen of the World have an 
Emergency Fund of approximately $29,- 
500,000. Sovereign Commander Frazer 
recommends that this fund be loaned to 
members of the order for the purpose 
of building homes. The payments on the 
principal, which it is estimated the bor- 
rowers will make, together with the in- 
surance that they carry will, in the judg- 
ment of the leaders, prove ample secur- 
ity for the mortgages thus obtained on 
the homes of its members. 



The Chinese Masons of Seattle, 
Washington, are erecting a temple at a 
cost of v$75,ooo. — Texas Freemason. 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



99 



ACCEPTABLE WORSHIP VERSUS 
LODGE WORSHIP. 

BY REV. MARTIN L. WAGNER, DAYTON, O. 

Jesus, in his interview with the Sama- 
ritan woman at Jacob's well (John 4 : 
6-26), gave utterance to certain princi- 
ples which are fundamental and which 
his followers must recognize and ob- 
serve if their worship is to be accepta])lc 
to God. The Samaritans supposed they 
worshiped Jehovah, whom they feared, 
but they also served other gods. They 
were a mongrel people, and their religion 
was a mongrel faith, a combination of 
opposites, and a union of imcompatil^les. 
It was paganism under the mask of Je- 
hovah worship. Jesus frankly told this 
Samaritan woman that the Samaritans 
worshiped they knew not what ; that sal- 
vation was from the Jews, and specifical- 
ly from that Jew who was then speaking 
to her ; that the true and acceptable wor- 
ship of God must not only recognize 
God as spirit, but must be offered in 
spirit and in truth. 

This declaration appears very simple 
and intelligible, but it has a depth of 
meaning too often not apprehended. It 
defines God rather abstractly, and sets 
forth the fundamental material in his 
worship, namely Truth. God is spirit, 
an infinite, incomprehensible, divine Be- 
ing, whose substance is pure spirit. We 
can know and conceive of him only as 
he has revealed himself in his Word, 
and through Jesus Christ, his Son, who 
is in the bosom of the Father, and has 
declared him ( John ■ i : 18). The God 
manifest in the flesh reveals to us the 
God who is spirit. In his purely spirit- 
ual nature and aspect, no man has ever 
seen God, or discovered him, or can 
know him, but, ag manifested in Jesus 
Christ, the Apostles and others have seen 
him, and even we also, through the eye 
of faith. 

To worship God is to recognize him 
as God, — God in himself and God to 
us, — and to honor him by ascribing unto 
him his divine attributes, and also his 
works of creation, of providence and 
especially of redemption which involves 
all the things that Jesus Christ did for 
our redemption from sin, death, and the 
power of the Devil. This we may term 
the objective element in worship, a rec- 
ognition of all that God has done for us. 



To worship (jod in spirit is the sub- 
jective side, and is a recognition of what 
God has done in us. It finds expression 
in our inmost selves and is the emphasis 
of .the inner truthfulness, and the life 
reality in our worship as over against 
the outward forms of that worship. The 
spirit of man, the inner part of his be- 
ing, which in its essence and nature is 
nearest akin to God, must be the active 
principle in the worship. The spirit in 
man is that which is born of God in him, 
born of the water and the Spirit so that 
it is only those who are born of the vSpirit 
that can worship him in spirit and in 
truth. It is a worship welling up out of 
the deep experiences of the soul of those 
who have become children of- God 
through the new birth. There is no true 
spirituality in religion, either in the 
knowledge of God, or in the worship of 
God, aside from the incarnate Son of 
God. 

Worship of God must be in tnith, not 
only a true expression of the spirit and 
heart of man, but must also be expressed 
in the truth of God, of which Christ is 
the source, the center, and the fulfillment. 
That is, in Jesus Christ, God has fulfilled 
all the promises made to Israel, and 
through Israel to the world ; and that 
Jesus Christ is made unto us wisdom and 
righteousness and sanctification and re- 
demption. This truth can not be rec- 
ognized as separate from Jesus Christ, 
and when Jesus Christ is rejected in anv 
worship, or when he and his work — 
ail of which is included in his "Name'' — 
are excluded* from any service of wor- 
ship, that which makes worship accept- 
able to God is eliminated. If the redemp- 
tion wrought by Jesus Christ is God's 
crowning work, if Jesus Christ — true 
God, begotten of the Father from eter- 
nity, and true man, born of the Mrgin 
Mary ; my Lord, who has redeemed me, a 
lost and condemned creature, with his 
holy and precious Blood shed in innocent 
sufferings and death — is not recognized 
in my worship of God, then such wor- 
ship, however sincerely or solemnly of- 
fered, is the greatest indignity and insult 
I can offer God. It is profaning his 
name while pretending to honor him. It 
is denying God's greatest work for me, 
namely, my redemption through Jesus 
Christ. 



100 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



The secret lodge worship ignores, re- 
jects, repudiates, and excludes the name 
of Jesus Christ from its worship. The 
name of Jesus Christ stands for all that 
he has done for human redemption and 
for the salvation he has provided. In 
so doing the Lodge tramples under foot, 
the blood of his covenant, and the cross, 
by which we were saved. It does this 
in its most solemn service, and, like the 
mongrel worship of the Samaritans, of- 
fers insult to Jehovah, while most sol- 
emnly professing to honor, fear and serve 
him. How can a Christian assent to 
such worship? How can he acquiesce 
or participate in a service which studious- 
ly repudiates the redemptive work of 
God through Jesus Christ, while profess- 
ing to worship him as Jehovah? Tke 
truth in and with which we worship 
God is inexorable in its demands upon 
liifn who accepts it. It allows of no du- 
bious statement or confession on the part 
of him who professes to hold it. 

The Samaritans had a temple, but 
Jesus never entered it, or taught in it. 
They had a worship, but neither Jesus 
nor the Apostles ever participated there- 
in. They had a paschal supper, but Jesus 
never communed with them in it. The 
discourse of Jesus implies that no true 
worshiper of the true God, Jehovah, the 
God and Father of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, could join with the Samaritans 
in their worship without doing dishonor 
to God, violence to his own spirit and 
denying the truth of which Jesus Christ 
is the source and center. He also frankly 
told the Samaritan woman that the im- 
moralities of her life and the immorali- 
ties of her people grew out of their cor- 
rupted idea of God, and of their per- 
verted worship. The moral life never 
rises higher in purity than the concep- 
tion which the worship holds of the 
purity of the god worshiped. - 



In Rutherford the Elks Lodge will ob- 
serve ''Boys' Day," and all the boys in 
South Bergen are welcome to come and 
hear what it all means. — Passcdc (N. J.) 
News, March 24, 19 17. 

Like their close friends, the saloon 
keepers, the destiny of the Elk outfit 
seems to depend on securiiag the boys. 



MOOSE PROPERTY ATTACHED. 

A writ of attachment against the prop- 
erty of the Loyal Order of Moose at 
Mooseheart, 111., was to be served to 
insure the payment of damages awarded 
by the Alabama courts for the death of 
two men who were killed in the course 
of an initiation at Birmingham. Donald 
A. Kenney and Christopher Gustin were 
killed through the unexpected action of 
a piece of electrical apparatus used by 
the Birmingham lodge in its initiation. 
Suit for $50,000 was brought on behalf 
of each against the supreme lodge, and 
damages awarded the heirs in the sum 
of $18,000 for Gustin and $15,000 for 
Kenney. The attachment of the prop- 
erty at Mooseheart follows affirmation 
by the Supreme Court of the United 
States of the judgment of the Alabama 
court. — Chicago Daily Nczvs, July 6th, 
1917. 



SERIOUS MATTER FOR MASONRY. 

In November last the Irish nationalists 
compelled the British government to rush 
through the House of Commons a bill 
prohibiting members of the Royal Irish 
Constabulary and the Dublin police from 
joining the Craft. The only protesting 
voice in the Commons was Col. Craig, 
of Belfast, a prominent Orangeman. The 
London Freemason called attention at 
the time to the silence preserved by the 
rhany prominent and distinguished Free- 
mason members of the House and hoped 
that when the bill reached the House of 
Lords, the peers would show a keener 
sense of the question at issue. 

December 20th the Marquess of 
Crewe, leader of the House of Lords, 
under the premiership of Mr. Asquith, 
moved the second reading of the bill 
and made a lengthy speech in its favor, 
and referred to the Roman Catholic pop- 
ulation of Ireland as being antagonistic 
to Ereemasonry. The bill passed and 
has received the royal assent. Although 
the House of Lords has scores of titled 
and distinguished members of the Craft, 
the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Dononghmore, 
Grand Master of Ireland, was the only 
one to speak against the bill. He re- 
ferred to the large number of Freema- 
sons in the privy council and said that if 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



101 



there was no danger to the state in these 
high officials being members of the craft, 
he thought" that a humble policeman in 
Ireland might have been ecjually immune. 
Our London contemporary thinks that 
the easy going fashion in which brethren, 
whether peers or commoners, allowed — 
with one solitary exception in each house 
— judgment to go by default against our 
order may prove a serious matter for 
Freemasonry. It is peculiar that the 
daily press both in Great Britain and Ire- 
land ignored the entire matter. — Toronto 
Freemason. 



C. H. Spurgeon once said in a ser- 
mon: "I stand by the happy memories 
of the past as in summer I walk down a 
green long ago. I see flowers of mercy 
growing in them. God's ways are at 
times like heavy wagon-tracks, and they 
cut deep into our souls ; yet they are all 
of them mercy. Whether our day's trip 
along like the angels mounting on Jacob's 
ladder to heaven, or grind along like the 
wagons which Joseph sent for Jacob, 
they are in each case ordered in mercy. 
'Surely, goodness and mercy have fol- 
lowed me all the days of my life.' " 




HOW A BAPTIST MINISTER WAS 
LED OUT OF MASONRY. 

[The author of this testimony, which orig- 
inally appeared in Home Light, is a pastor in 
good standing in the Baptist denomination, 
but at his request his name is withheld from 
publication.] 

I had been preaching over a dozen 
years after graduating from the Theo- 
logical Seminary before I got entangled 
in the IMasonic net. Early in my min- 
istry in a certain state I had been told I 
ought to join the Masons, but one of my 
deacons who was a Knight Templar Ma- 
son said that he would not advise me tD 
join any of the secret societies. Pos- 
sibly that had something to do with keep- 
ing me from accepting any of the invi- 
tations I received to go into the orders. 



In one of my pastorates I preached to 
the Odd-Fellows and the Rebekahs, the 
Knights Pythias, the Ancient Order of 
L^nited Workmen, the Foresters and in 
another place to the Royal Arcanum. 
The Odd-Fellows were so pleased with 
my sympathetic handling of the order 
that I was urgently invited to join them. 
The Knights of Pythias even went so far 
as to offer to pay my initiation fee if I 
would only consent to join. I was re- 
peatedly invited to join the Royal Arca- 
num. The Masons would have received 
me into their ranks without paying a cent 
for the initiation, for there were certain 
provisions made for the reception of 
ministers. I refused all invitations. 

Some years later a young man of thir- 



102 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



ty-live, whom I liad led to Christ and re- 
ceived into the fellowship of the church, 
came to see me. He brought with him 
another young man, the superintendent 
of a Congregational Sunday School. I 
had the highest respect for the Christian 
character and purposes of both of these 
men, and I listened with attention and 
favor to their proposal that I join their 
Masonic Lodge. J\Iy friend that I had 
led to Christ told me that he wanted me 
to join so that I might understand the 
things that appealed to men. He thought 
it would broaden me, and possibly help 
me in reaching men for Christ. His 
friend, the Sunday School superintend- 
ent, backed up the invitation and I de- 
cided to sign the application. All that 
the initiation was to cost me was the 
trouble of going through the ceremonies. 
The rest was all provided for, because I 
was a minister. 

The night when I was to take the En- 
tered Apprentice, or the first degree, ar- 
rived and I was on hand. Before my 
initiation I was required to pay my year- 
ly dues in advance. Then clothed only 
in my union suit, a pair of outing flannel 
lodge drawers, a cape of the same mate- 
rial, one stocking, with a rope round my 
neck, hanging down behind, with a hood- 
wink over my eyes, I was led to the door 
of the lodge by one of the members who 
served as conductor. 

I was received into the lodge room 
from the preparatory or robing room on 
the point of the compass applied to my 
naked left breast. Then I was led to the 
altar, where I knelt and a Christless 
prayer was offered. I should like to give 
each step of the initiation, but space will 
not allow. There was nothing to give 
any special offense until you reached the 
obligation. You did not notice then as 
you do afterwards that Christ is omitted. 
The obligation was administered at the 
altar and was immediately followed by 
the awful words of penalty for any viola- 
tion of the obligation. I got on pretty 
well through the obligation proper, but 
when the words "binding myself by no 
less a penalty than that of having mv 
throat cut from ear to ear, my tongue 
torn out by its roots," I hesitated instinc- 
tively. There was no time to weigh mat- 
ters carefully. I was blinded by the 
hoodwink. The eyes of men whom I did 



not know were on me. The path of least 
resistance was of course to repeat the 
words, horrible though they were, and 
the remaining words of the penalty — "my 
body buried in the rough sands of the sea 
at cable-tow's length from the shore, 
where the tide ebbs and flows twice in 
twenty-four hours, should I in the least 
degree, knowingly, willingly or unlaw- 
fully violate or transgress this my En- 
tered Apprentice solemn obligation. So 
help me God and keep me steadfast." 

Previous to taking this Entered Ap- 
prentice obligation, I was informed by 
the Master of the Lodge that "in this ob- 
ligation there is nothing that will conflict 
with the duties you may owe to your 
God, your country, your neighbor, or 
yourself." Then this oath was admin- 
istered after that solemn promise that 
there was nothing to conflict with a man's 
duties to God, and this very oath sanc- 
tioned murder that God's holy command- 
ment— 'T/zoi^ Shalt Not Kiir forbids. 

I was thoroughly depressed and dis- 
gusted by that initiation, and as I en- 
tered the robing room to get my clothing 
on I asked if there was not a man mur- 
dered at one time by the Masons. I was 
assured by a minister, who was a high 
Masonic official, that he was not reallv 
murdered, but had merely disappeared. 
That was a lie, for later I read in Charles 
G. Finney's book on Masonry of the mur- 
der of William Morgan, and it made my 
blood run cold. 

Becomes Disgusted with Masonry. 

I thought when I got home that night 
that I should go no farther in Masonry. 
I felt I had seen enough, and I was dis- 
gusted with it and fairly loathed it. My 
friend, who had induced me to go into it 
and the Sunday School superintendent, 
said the words of the penalty did not 
mean what they said. They were only 
an ancient wording and that was all. 

I said nothing to my wife when I got 
home. The next morning I said that the 
thing had not appealed to me, and I 
thought I would go no farther. I felt 
more and more disgusted at the thought 
of Masonry. The sight of a Masonic 
emblem on men's coats almost made me 
shudder. T cannot now see that Masonic 
emblem on any man without feeling a 
sense of loathing. 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



103 



As the days passed, I seemed to cool 
down a little, and get over my disgust 
for Masonry. When the next monthly 
meeting came around and I was sum- 
moned to be present to be initiated as a 
Fellow Craft, I was on hand. I was able 
to go through the obhgation even to the 
penalty without much trouble, for I con- 
sidered the words — "binding myself by 
no less a penalty than that of having my 
breast torn open, my heart plucked out, 
my body exposed to be devoured by the 
beasts of the field," as being only hard 
sounding words but with little or no 
meaning. 

Decides to Investigate. 

After the Fellow Craft degree had 
been given I was told by one of the 
members of the Lodge that in the third 
degree I would not get off so easy, but 
would get all that was coming to me. 
Several weeks went by and it was about 
one week before the third degree was to 
be given. I began to think that perhaps 
I had better do a little investigating be- 
fore I took that third degree. There 
might be something in it that might be 
rather shocking. There came to my 
mind that there was a place in Boston 
where they had exposes of Masonry. I 
hunted around and found a copy of 
Home Light, and the address 560 Co- 
lumbus avenue, Boston. 

I found upon investigation that the 
third degree or Master Mason's degree 
was far more terrible than the other two. 
In the obligation the candidate promised 
not to reveal the secrets of a Master 
Mason when revealed to him as such, 
"murder and treason excepted." In oth- 
er words, I found that this oath bound a 
man to conceal the crimes of a brother 
Mason except murder and treason. 
Arson, adultery, stealing, lying, etc., must 
be concealed. Then, too, the Master 
Mason's oath bound the man not to com- 
mit adultery with a Master Mason's 
mother, wife, sister, daughter. It said 
nothing whatever about committing adul- 
tery with other women, but would seem 
to infer that carnal intercourse with oth- 
er women would not make a man any 
less of a right kind of a man or a Mason. 
The penalty attached to the obligation 
referred to having the body severed in 
twain. I also found that after the can- 
didate had supposed the initiation was 



over and he had put his own clothes on 
that he was led once more into the lodge 
room, told that he was far from being a 
Master Mason, required to kneel and go 
through the form of prayer (the candi- 
date being asked to pray for himself 
silently or audibly), and blindfolded by 
the hoodwink to be the victim in the 
mock murder of Hiram Abiff. This 
Hiram Abiff was never murdered so far 
as we can learn from the Bible. Sickels 
in his "Ahiman Rezon," page 172, con- 
nects the murder of Hiram Abiff cere- 
mony with the Egyptian Isianic Alyster- 
ies. 

Leads Those Out Who Got Him In. 

Having investigated pretty carefully 
the third degree, I called my initiation 
off. My friend who was high up in the 
Masonic body was angry because I had 
investigated and had decided to go no 
farther in Masonry. The Sunday School 
superintendent seemed to understand my 
position. He even admitted he had 
doubts himself about Alasonry. I placed 
in his hands Dr. Blanchard's little book, 
''Modern Secret Societies,'' and that set- 
tled him as to the stand he was going to 
take. He put the same book into my 
friend's hands, and my friend sat up un- 
til early into the morning reading it. 
Both the Sunday School superintendent 
and my friends saw where ]\Iasonry 
stood, and both of them came out of it, 
and also from the Knights of Pythias. 
My friend asked my pardon for being 
provoked at me. Thus my stand for 
Christ and his righteousness brought out 
of the darkness the two young men who 
had invited me in. 

Masonry is a Christless religion. It 
has elements in it that connect it with 
the old Egyptian mysteries of Isis. The 
''point within a circle'' (see Free Ala- 
sonry Illustrated by Jacob Doesburg) in 
the Entered Apprentice Lecture accord- 
ing to Alackey represents the coition, or 
commerce of the sexes (Mackey's Rit- 
ualist, page 62). This is connected with 
Phallic or Sun Worship. Thus Masonry 
is not only Christless, but immoral. It 
is a system of organized selfishness. 
Masons often disregard the rights of 
others to favor brother Masons. 

Some one nn'ght ask me, ''What right 
have you to testify against Masonry?" 



104 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



I answer that I was deceived by Mason- 
ry. I took the ]\Iasonic oaths under- 
standing there was nothing in either of 
the two I took that w^ould conflict with 
nly duties to God. I found that both 
oaths countenanced murder. The mock 
murder of Hiram Abiff enacted when- 
ever the third degree is given is nothing 
more than an education for murder. 
Wlien a Knight Templar w^as told that 
the ^lasonic Lodge is a continuous edu- 
cation for murder he replied, "That is 
nonsense; there is not a word of truth in 
it." The other man said, "I^t me ask 
you a question ; do you think that a man 
could be in a Masonic lodge room once 
a week, and hear the oath administered 
and see the signs given," (note that these 
signs given before the altar allude to the 
murderous penalties of the obligations), 
"without coming to believe that it would 
be right to kill a mari who should break 
his IMasonic oath ?" The Knight Templar 
replied, "Why, I think any man who 
breaks a Masonic oath ought to be 
killed." 

Any Christian layman or any Christian 
minister is under no obligation to keep 
the murderous, unholy Masonic vows. 
To regard such obligation as binding 
upon the Christian or upon any man is 
to stand by an institution that not only 
countenances murder, but which has in 
times past practiced murder. Let me 
ask this question, "What fellowship hath 
light with darkness?" 

Every man or woman that can should 
read two books : Dr. Blanchard's book 
on "Modern Secret Societies" and 
Charles G. Finney's "The Character, 
Claims and Practical Workings of Free- 
masonry." 



Henry Ford, of automobile fame, is 
said to be a member of the Palestine 
Masonic Lodge, of Detroit, Mich. 



The Grand Lodge of New York, at its 
recent annual communication, extended 
fraternal recognition to the Grand 
Lodge of San Salvador, Central Amer- 
ica. — Texas Freemason. 

So that is what caused the earth- 
quake ! 



"THE CASE AGAINST THE LODGE." 

BY REV. M. A. MALCOM, ALBIA, IOWA. 

[We are glad to print this review by Rev. 
M. A. Malcom, president of the Iowa State 
Association.] 

"The Case Against the Lodge, With 
Special Reference to the Woodmen of 
the World" is the title page of a booklet 
by Mr. Benjamin M. Holt of Clifton, 
Texas. The author of this treatise, a 
Norwegian Lutheran, was once a Mason 
and a member of a number of other 
secret societies. For conscientious rea- 
son, he withdrew from secretism. His 
little book gives special consideration 
to the Woodmen of the World, but the 
facts and arguments presented cover the 
general ground of secretism, and afford 
strong reasons why a consistent Chris- 
tian cannot join the lodge. 

The contents of the book consist of 
eight chapters. The title of the first 
chapter is, "The History and Organiza- 
tion of the Woodmen of the World." In 
1882-83 at Lyons, Iowa, Joseph CuUen 
Root penned the ritual and first pros- 
pectus of the secret society known as the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and re- 
mained at the head of the order until 
1889, when he resigned because of 
charges preferred against him for fraud. 
In company with a few other men he or- 
ganized the Woodmen of the World. 
Root was a member of the Masons, 
Odd-Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and 
other orders. He was a prominent fig- 
ure in the Woodmen of the World until 
his death in 19 13. The Woodmen of the 
World is one o'f the strongest secret so- 
cieties in America. It ranks No. i 
among the forty or more so-called "Mil- 
lionaire" lodges, claiming in total assets, 
(combined with its women's auxiliary 
and Canadian Jurisdiction), the aggre- 
gate of forty million dollars. The head- 
quarters of the order are in its mag- 
nificent .eighteen story building, cost- 
ing $1,500,000, at Omaha, Nebraska. 
The order is composed of the Sovereign, 
Pacific, and Canadian Jurisdictions, the 
Woodmen Circle (the woman's auxil- 
iary of the "Sovereign Jurisdiction"), the 
Women of Woodcraft, (the woman's 
auxiliary of the "Pacific Jurisdiction"), 
and the Boys of Woodcraft. This last 
division is made up of boys from ten 
to eighteen years of age, and is a large 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



105 



feeder of the order. This chapter also 
gives a list of the papers and books pub- 
lished by the order. 

The second chapter deals with the 
foolish and sacrilegious forms of imi- 
tation. It says: "In the center of the 
'camp' is placed a large altar-stump bear- 
ing a metal emblem of the Holy cross, 
and a Holy Bible is placed on the altar 
stump. An ax is also imbedded in this 
stump, its handle pointing towards the 
Adviser Lieutenant's station. A cush- 



didate calls upon the name of God, and 
grasps one end of a pair of bones from 
the leg of a dead man, the other end 
being held by the Past Consul Corrj- 
mander. The candidate is then tested by 
a ceremony which is a ridiculous mock- 
ery of the thirty-seventh chapter of 
(jenests. The "final'' charge is given at 
the lodge room grave. The ceremony is 
concluded with the conferring of the 
"secret work." After an ode is sung, 
every member goes to the altar and 




ion for kneeling is provided, to be placed 
at the base of the altar-stump. It is in 
this 'solemn' spot that the W. O. W. 
'stranger' (candidate) bends his knee to 
Baal and takes the oaths of secrecy.'' 

At a certain stage in the initiation a 
human skull is placed in the hands of 
the hoodwinked candidate. This is to 
add force to the obligations which are 
imposed. In the process of initiation 
three oaths are imposed. The first oath 
is taken by the candidate with the skull 
in his hands. The second is taken at 
the altar. The hoodwink is then re- 
moved, and after further ceremonies tlie 
next degree is taken. Later the third 
oath is administered, in which the can- 



grasps the helve of the imbedded ax, a 
penal sign to keep silent concerning the 
transactions of the camp. 

Chapter three discusses the subject of 
"Oaths." The first oath is called "a sol- 
emn pledge." "a pledge of honor," 
while the second and third are called 
"solemn and binding obligations,'' 
"promised before God and these wit- 
nesses.'' Mr. Holt says that the lodge 
oaths are not harmless jokes, but seri- 
ous realities of such force that they are 
gix'en preference above all other oaths, 
and are allowed to interfere with civil 
])rocesses of law. In regard to the bind- 
ing obligation of lodge oaths, he says : 
"To have any binding force, lodge oaths 



106 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



would have to be administered by per- 
sons duly authorized in official capacity 
to administer them, and by persons who 
have the moral and legal authority to 
do so. Furthermore, any kind of pledge 
or promise which contradicts a former 
promise (that is, where the former prom- 
ise was legal), and where the perform- 
ance is unlawful or impossible, is cer- 
tainly not binding. Again, nearly all 
lodge oaths are procured by fraud and 
misrepresentation, and demand absolute 
and unlimited obedience to unknown 
laws, unapprehended powers, and non- 
existing authorities, and are therefore 
null and void. I have been a Mason and 
a member of other lodges, and I dare 
say that lodge oaths usually stand in con- 
tradiction to the clear conscience of 
everv intelligent person who has taken 
them. Hence it is the duty of all who 
have lodge oaths on their conscience to 
repudiate them before God and man at 
once and forever." 

The title of the fourth chapter is: 
"Evidence from Lodge Supply Cata- 
logues." "Like all other lodges, the 
Woodmen of the World, entertains the 
candidate with the so-called ceremonies 
of initiation and there is, perhaps, no 
lodge that has more tomfoolery con- 
nected with its ritualism and religion 
than the Woodmen of the World." This 
chapter gives a list of the lodge supply 
houses and their advertised regalia and 
supplies, among which are found, cross- 
bones, skulls, shackles, hand-cuffs, dag- 
gers, swords, sabers, wooden shoes, wigs, 
beards, masks, caskets, corpses, goats, 
guillotines, and sawmills. The last two 
are designed to produce a horrible ex- 
perience for the candidate. Listances 
are given of authentic cases, where death 
has resulted from initiations in the or- 
der. 

Chapter five is entitled, "W. O. W. 
Religion." The object is to show that 
the Woodmen of the World lodge is re- 
ligious, and its religion is not of Christ. 
The use of the Bible, cross, altar, etc., 
implies that there is religious teaching in 
the lodge. The funeral ceremonies and 
other literature of the order declare its 
religfious character. The Satanic source 
of Woodmen religion is summed up in 
these words of J. C. Root, the father of 
Woodcraft ; "Our doors are left open 



to the Jew and Gentile, the Catholic and 
the Protestant, the agnostic and the 
atheist." Another of their authors says, 
"Here are no questions of political party 
or sectarian creed. Good moral char- 
acter and honesty of intention are the 
only requirements. . . . Such so- 
cieties came into existence through the 
inspiration of Almighty God. . . . 
Our order invites men of all religious 
beliefs. . . . We know no North, 
no South, and no creed except the creed 
of helpful, loving deeds." 

It is thus apparent that the religion of 
the lodge is the old Satanic doctrine of 
salvation by works and self -righteous- 
ness, which is in direct opposition to a 
religion by faith in Jesus Christ. But 
not even good works are insisted upon, 
for the lodge claims salvation for every 
member who dies while in good stand- 
ing, whether he is a Christian or an un- 
believer, moral or immoral, a drunkard, 
or a profane man — all alike, at the grave, 
are given passports to the eternal glories 
of their Maker. 

"Lodge Charity" is discussed in chap- 
ter six, which shows from their own 
authorities that the boasted benevolence 
and charity of the order is a farce. The 
benefits of the lodge are only for those 
who are sound physically, and who are 
in good standing by reason of dues care- 
fully paid up. Their "charity" is re- 
stricted and amounts to nothing more 
or less than a life insurance policy. 

"Lodge Insurance" is the subject of 
the seventh chapter, which shows that 
fraternal insurance is based on unscien- 
tific principles and is therefore unsafe. 
Again and again orders have been com- 
pelled to increase their rates. As their 
members grow old — at the time when 
they most need the benefits of insurance 
— the rates become prohibitive, and 
many lose the money paid in, and are 
left without resources. Thirty-three 
states have adopted laws protecting the 
people in some measure, from the un- 
certainty of lodge insurance societies. 
Charges of extravagance are substan- 
tiated from the records of the order. 

Chapter eight deals with "Political 
Power" and gives concrete examples of 
political power and position obtained 
through the work of the order. 

In conclusion, the author says, "Wlien 



August, .1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



107 



I was a member of the Masonic order 
and several other lodges, it pleased God 
in his great mercy to reveal to me the 
damnable character of the lodge. It 
therefore becomes my duty to contribute 
what I can towards the enlightenment of 
my fellow Christians regarding the 
lodge and its attendant evils. I 
wish, if possible, to arrest the spread 
of lodgery in the Christian Church by 
giving my fellow Christians at least so 
much information as to induce them 
to examine the subject for themselves. 
Such an investigation, I am sure, would 
result in an outright condemnation of 
secretism. Only correct, truthful in- 
formation is needed to banish this great 
body of pretense from Christian society. 
Hence it becomes the duty of all Chris- 
tians, whether within or without the 
lodge, to become thoroughly acquainted 
with lodge teachings, principles, and 
claims. I did not jump at my task in 
fanatical frenzy. I have carefully 
weighed all detail, and I find, after my 
six years' experience on the inside of 
lodges, combined wnth my four years of 
diligent study from the outside, of which 
one whole year has been devoted to a 
special study of the Woodmen of the 
World, that the lodge is wrong, utterly 
zvrong." 

I commend this little booklet, as a 
sane presentation of the subject with 
which it deals, and trust it may prove 
a message of light and power to many, 
in leading them from .darkness into 
light, and from the slavery of lodgism 
into the liberty of the children of God. 

Copies of Mr. Holt's "Case Against 
the Lodge'' may be obtained from the 
Cynosure office for 25 cents each. 



Perfection. In times of general sin- 
ning and apostacy like the present, many 
good, yet weak men are apt to imagine, 
because they resist the corruption of the 
times, that they have and they only, the 
true theory of holiness, and that they 
can sanctify the world by teaching their 
theory. They really think that they can 
''spread holiness over these lands" as 
Wesley did, by teaching sentimental and 
experimental holiness amid the Masonry 
and other abominations of the age which 
have fastened upon the churches, and 
that li'ithont rebuking them. 



SURRENDERED LIVES. 

[ first met ]\Ir. Rufus Johnson and his 
wife, Mrs. C. A. Johnson, many years 
ago at one of our conventions at St. 
Paul, Minn. Mr. Johnson was one 01 
the farmers of Minnesota but one who 
gave first place to the claims of God. 
There was always time in their large 
family for reading of the Bible and pray- 
er before beginning the day's work. Their 
children and grandchildren, so far as 





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RUFUS JOHNSOiSr. 

the writer is acquainted, are of like faith 
and character. It is now some years 
since that Mrs. Johnson has had to car- 
ry on her Master's work without the lov- 
ing companionship of her devoted hus- 
band. This she has done humbly and 
faithfully. We have recently come into 
the possession of Mrs. Johnson's expe- 
riences when, many years ago, she joined 
the Grange, and ask its prayerful read- 
ing. It is a rich illustration of the 
blessedness of the fully surrendered life. 
I wish it were possible in connection 
with her testimony to present also her 
photograph. That may be possible at 
some future time. We are able to give 
our readers a likeness of her husband, 



108 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



and to bear this testimony as to both of 
them, that their prayers and gifts have 
been one of the valuable assets in that 
part of Christ's vineyard that the Na- 
tional Christian Association has been 
given to cultivate. 

Wm. I. Phillips.. 



EXPERIENCE AS A GRANGER. 

I was interested in the condensed 
statement of the N. C. A. Annual Meet- 
ing. I am gl^d for anything that gets 
Christians interested, more intensely in- 
terested, in living and speaking against 
the lodges that, like the plagues of Egypt, 
are multiplying as fast as they can get 
new names for them. 

I joined the Grange back in 1874. 
When they said I must address the blas- 
ter of the lodge as Worthy Alaster, it 
startled me so that I did not hear any 
more for awhile. Call no man Master, 
for one is your master (Mat. 23:10) 
came like a flash. Then I thought there 
might be something else I ought to hear, 
so I listened, but I went home thinking 
that that would be the end. When some- 
one told me that children call their teach- 
ers master, I went again to the Grange 
two or three times. One night we were 
lat€ and I had to give the password and 
I v\^as so embarrassed that I did not go 
around and salute the officers. They 
were going to put me out, but one man 
more merciful than the others said that 
they all knew me and that it was a mis- 
take and was not done purposely. They 
let me stay, but I did not go again. 

One morning the children had gone to 
school and my husband to town ; I was 
busy doing the morning work and was 
thinking that I would be glad to know if 
it were wrong to be a Granger. Shun 
the very appearance of evil (I, Thes. 
5:22) came to me so suddenly that I 
looked around to see who had spoken. 
I decided that, if I lived as near the 
Grange Hall as some others did, and if 
I were alone with my little children and 
saw a crowd of people going in there, 
and saw the blinded windows and that 
they had a gatekeeper, and if I did not 
know what it was all for, I would think 
that surely they were doing something 
evil. In a social part of a prayer meet- 
ing soon after, I told of my experience 



with the Grange and of my decision to 
meet with them no more. But God did 
not leave me there. He brought to my 
mind passage after passage of the Bible 
that v.-as against secret societies, and 
some of them, when a Sunday school 
girl, I had wondered how to apply. One 
in particular was: "If thy right eye of- 
fend thee, pluck it out and cast it from 
thee, for it is profitable for thee that one 
of thy members should perish and not 
that thy whole body should be cast into 
hell. And if thy right hand ofifend thee, 
cut it oil and cast it from thee, for it is 
profitable for thee that one of thy mem- 
bers should perish and not that thy whole 
body should be cast into hell." (Matt. 
5 :29-30.) God let me see that if I were 
doing anything or had anything that was 
wrong and it involved anything as use- 
ful as my right hand, to cut it ofif, or 
anything as dear as my right eye, to pluck 
it out even if it hurt. It was so much 
on my mind that I lost my appetite and 
could not sleep. 

One day a couple neighbors took my 
husband and me about three miles to 
visit some friends. There were quite a 
few friends and we spent the day pleas- 
antly and w^ent home, but on the way 
home w^e came to a turn in the road and 
the two men went on, and the woman 
and myself turned homeward afoot, walk- 
ing three-quarters of a mile. It was a 
frosty night and w^hen I was going to 
bed I decided that I would get some 
sleep that night as the brisk walk and 
the company of the day would help. I 
did go to sleep but awoke gasping for 
breath. I thought I was dying and all, 
which the Lord had wanted me to tell 
the people, came back to me. I thought, 
If God will let me live, I'll go and tell 
them if I have to crawl on my hands and 
knees. Then the blood of their souls 
will not be on my skirts. In a second I 
was all right. I went to a series of meet- 
ings and each evening after the sermon 
they gave a liberty for the people to 
testify. The man holding the meetings 
was an Odd-Fellow and he had some- 
thing in his sermon each evening that 
made it easy for me to say wdiat God 
gave me to say. I testified some each 
night. The Lord will lead us if we will 
be led and walk in all the light he gives 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



109 



us or lets shine on our path. The blood 
of Jesus will cleanse us from all sin.- 

The end was : The Grange broke up 
and some Odd-Fellows got out of their 
order and became antisecret men. God 
was with us and wonderfully blessed us 
and added to our numbers. 

Brother Phillips, ''All the way my 
Saviour leads me, What have I to ask 
beside. Heavenly peace, divinest com- 
fort, He through life has been my guide." 
(Mrs.) C. a. Johnson. 

July 6, 1917. 

Comrey, Alberta, Canada. 



SUFFERERS IN BIBLE LANDS. 

MEAD A. KELSEY, RICHMOND, IND. 

I wish to remind members of the 
Cynosure family of the great suffering 
in the Bible lands and of the need there 
is of immediate and continuous relief. 
The Easter message of the Federal 
Council of Churches contained the fol- 
lowing : 

"The people in the Bible lands — Chris- 
tians and innocent Moslems, Armenians, 
Syrians, Persians — are in the grip of 
suft'ering greater in extent than was ever 
known in the age of the martyrs. Over 
two millions of these poor people are in 
a state of starvation and are utterly de- 
pendent upon the charity of America." 

This situation, which has been going 
from bad to worse for a long- time, had 
its origin in the massacre and deporta- 
tions of two years ago. To-day the suf- 
ferers are chiefly women and children, 
for most of the men were massacred. 
Conditions are pitiable beyond the tell- 
ing. One city alone reports 40,000 or- 
phans, another 10,000, and so on. And 
the danger lies just here, that with Eu- 
rope all afire, we in America, who are the 
sole hope of these people, will forget, or 
that which is just as bad, neglect them. 

Doubtless many Cynosure readers 
have already given to this cause, and I 
can readily believe that churches which 
I know, have contributed before this, but 
let us remember that this is a continuous 
task, that people who are fed to-day will 
need again to-morrow, and so we need to 
repeat our gifts, enlarging them if pos- 
sible. 

Money may be sent through denom- 
inational channels but should go as 
quickly as possible to Chas. R. Crane, 



Treasurer, Armenian-Syrian Relief, 70 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. Every 
dollar so sent goes for relief without auy 
deduction for administration. Remem- 
ber, they are dying over there and defer 
not thy gift. 

The Roman Catholic church is by no 
means the only avowed enemy of Free- 
masonry. Several of the Protestant 
sects forbid their communicants to be- 
come members of the Freemasons, and 
a branch of the Methodist Church pub- 
lishes a monthly magazine in Chicago 
devoted almost entirely to combating 
Masonry. — Texas Freemason. 

A Masonic editor's source of informa- 
tion must be as complete as the German 
spy system is reputed to be. Strange, 
isn't it, that w^e never heard of the 
Methodist magazine he has discovered? 

BOOK NOTICES. 

American Anthology Disproving the 
Bock of Mormon. — By Rev. C. A. Shook, 
formerly a Josephite Mormon ; a very able 
and unanswerable statement of facts from 
the highest anthropological authorities of 
America, showing that the twelve basic state- 
ments of the Book of Mormon about the pre- 
historic races of this continent are, as the 
authority, Prof. George Frederick Wright of 
Oberlin, cuttingly says, "made without any 
regard to the facts." The tract is very in- 
teresting to one who cares for the facts about 
either our early American peoples or the Book 
of Mormon. It ought to have a wide reading. 
Price 5c. Address : Utah Gdspel Mission, 
1854 E. 81st street, Cleveland, Ohio. 



Josephite, or Reorganized Mormonism.^^ 
By Rev. John -D. Nutting, who considers it 
his most laboriously prepared and perhaps 
his most effective work thus far. It consists 
of 44 pages and cover, with ten illustrations. 
It covers the origin and early history of Mor- 
monism, showing how the death of Joe Smith 
gave rise to many sects in Mormonism, of 
which the Utah or Brighamite and the La- 
moui or Josephite branches are the two now 
known and important.. The tract brings out 
clearly tlie fact that everything in Utah Mor- 
monism is the natural harvest from the teach- 
ings which Josephite Mormonism openly ad- 
vocates to-da}^ in logical sequence of thought 
which cannot be avoided. The closing chap- 
ters, on the people of each system, and on 
the attitude which Christian people should 
take towards them, are also especially valu- 
able. Price h'c. Address: Utah Gospel Mis- 
sion. 1854 K. 81st street, Cleveland, Ohio. 



The Christian State, a Christocracy. — Bv 
Rev. J. M. Foster. 44 S._ Russel street, Bos- 
ton, ?ilassachusetts. District Secretary of the 
National Reform Association. For copies of 
thi^" pamphlet address the author. 



110 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



3l0l|n (JPitinrg AJiama— i'ixtl) f rpatJif ttt Intt? Ji i>tatf 



[^^'e shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William JMorgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

Ouincy, August 25, 1832. 
William L. Stone, Esq. 

Dear Sir: In my last letter I ob- 
served, with the freedom and candor 
which I thought due to you as the best 
return I could make for the honor and 
obligation you had conferred upon me 
by addressing to me your your letters 
upon JNIasonry and Antimasonry, that 
there were many things in the book 
which I did not see as you did. 

Some further explanation is due from 
me upon this subject. The principal ob- 
jects of your book were two. First, to 
vindicate the character of an eminent 
and illustrious citizen of New York, the 
late governor of the state, DeWitt Clin- 
ton, from the opprobrium cast upon 
him, of having been personally and deep- 
ly concerned in the murder of Morgan ; 
and, secondly, to prove, by a fair and 
impartial statement of the abuses to 
which the Masonic institutions have been 
perverted, that they ought to be volun- 
tarily surrendered and abolished. 

These objects were just and laudable. 
They are in your volume faithfully pe- 
rused ; nor is there in the execution of 
your plan anything in the letters un- 
suited or redundant. You observe, in 
the first letter, that it is not part of your 
design to write a vindication of Free- 
masonry as such, but to describe Free- 
masonry as you received, understood, 
and practiced it yourself, and as it has 
been received, understood, and practiced 
by hundreds of virtuous and intelhgent 
men, with whom you have associated in 
the lodgeroom. To this the first ten let- 
ters are devoted, and they are in my es- 
timation not less valuable than those 
which succeed them. But, as Bishop 
Watson wrote an apology for the Bible, 
I trust you will not consider me as in- 
tending any disparagement to that part 
of your work if I consider it in the light 



of an apology for Freemasonry, as re- 
ceived, understood, and practiced by 
yourself and many others. In that light 
it is exceedingly well adapted to its pur- 
pose. It is the only rational plea for 
the institution that I have seen since this 
controversy began, for all the other de- 
fenses of the handmaid which have come 
to my knowledge have smacked too much 
of the obligation to come to the aid of a 
distressed brother and extricate him 
from his difiiculties, right or wrong, to 
pass for anything other than aggrava- 
tions of the Morgan-murder crimes. 

You have taken all the degrees to and 
including that of the Knight Templar. 
The oaths, obligations, and penalties, as 
administered to and understood by you, 
contained nothing incompatible with your 
duties to your country and your kind. 
Whatever there might be in them, appar- 
ently incongruous with the prior and 
paramount duties of the citizen and 
Christian, was explained and given in 
charge in such manner as to be made en- 
tirely subordinate to them. The obli- 
gations, as understood by you, are all 
auxiliaries to Christian benevolence and 
patriotism, and so they are undoubtedly 
understood by great multitudes of Ma- 
sons in all parts of the United States. 
That they are otherwise understood, also, 
by multitudes of worthy brethren of the 
craft (worthy, according to the Ma- 
sonic meaning of the word) is apparent 
in -every page of your book. 

In your third letter, page 23, you al- 
lude to an opinion which I once ex- 
pressed to you in the following terms : 
"You, sir, have assured me that the ob- 
ligations supposed to be administered in 
conferring the first degree is quite 
enough, in your view, to estabHsh the 
wicked character of the institution." 

Whether I did make use of terms quite 
so strong in the freedom of unrestrained 
conversation, or whether your reference 
to it is by inference of your own, from 
words not quite so comprehensive, is 
not material. . The sentiment which I do 
recollect to have expressed, and which is 
rooted in my conviction, was "that the 
Entered Apprentice's oath, obligation, 
and annexed penalty, was in itself vl- 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Ill 



cioiis, and such as ought never to be ad- 
ministered by man to man" ; that no ex- 
planation of it could take away its es- 
sentially immoral character, and that the 
institution of Freemasonry, requiring ab- 
sohitely the administration of it to every 
candidate for admission, ne^ssarily 
shared in its immorality. 

In saying this, I disclaim all intention 
of censure upon any individual who has 
ever taken this oath. I consider it ac- 
cording to its own import — stripped of 
all warrant of authority from the great 
names of illustrious men who may have 
taken it. 

My objections to it are these: 

1. That it is an extrajudicial oath, and, 
as such, contrary to the laws of the 
land. 

2. That it is a violation of the precept 
of Jesus Christ — swear not at all. 

3. That this oath pledges the candi- 
date, in the name of God, that he will al- 
ways hail, forever conceal, and never re- 
veal any of the secret arts, parts, or 
points of the mysteries "of Freemasonry 
to any person under the canopy of heav- 
en, except it shall be to a true and law^ful 
Mason, or within the body of a just and 
regular lodge of such, and not unto him 
or them until after due trial, strict ex- 
amination, or by the lawful information 
of a brother, I shall have found him or 
theiii as justly and lawfully entitled to 
the same as I am myself." 

The arts, parts, points, and mysteries 
of Masonry are afterward, in the oath, 
denominated the secrets of the craft. 
These are general and indefinite terms. 
The candidate, when he takes the oath, 
IS kept in total ignorance of what these 
secrets of the craft consist. He knows 
not the nature nor extent of the oath that 
-he takes. He is sworn to keep secret he 
knows not what. The general assurance 
that it is not to affect his religion or 
politics is the mere word of another man. 
The assurance that it is not to interfere 
with any of his duties is but a mockery, 
when the administration of the oath it- 
self is a violation of law. 

He sw^ears to reveal the secrets of the 
craft to no person under the canopy of 
heaven, except to a brother Mason, or a 
lodge. The single exception express.ed 
is an exclusion of all others. There is 
no exception for the authority of law, or 



for the confession enjoined upon the 
Catholic brethren by their religion. I 
use this illustration to show that the in- 
trinsic import of the oath is incompati- 
ble with law, civil and religious. 
(To be continued.) 



CAPITALIZING PATRIOTISM. 

Professing great love of country, many 
lodges have purchased Liberty Bonds. 
A very good thing all would admit if 
the investments were made as a patriotic 
duty. But some of the lodges can not be 
credited with having bought the Bonds 
because of patriotism. Their real motive 
is self-advertising, as is evidenced by the 
following: (The italics are ours.) 

"Shout it from the house-tops, tell it 
far and wide, as the action richly de- 
serves, that Crescent . lodge of Buft'alo 
invested the sum of ten thousand dollars 
in Liberty Bonds. 

''What other lodge of any fraternity 
has ever rendered such a service to the 
country? What grand body of any fra- 
ternity has made so great and most 
praisew^orthy a record ? 

"And how^ such an act stands in 
mighty contrast w^ith the eloquent, patri- 
otically worded but otherwise meaning- 
less preambles and resolutions of grand 
bodies, pledging this and that, but giving 
nothing. 

''And what act could the Sovereign 
Grand Lodge do which, would be far 
better than professions of loyalty, which 
would redound to the Order's credit, 
which w^ould bring it to the world's at- 
tention as it has never been brought be- 
fore, which would advertise it a thousand 
fold better than any parade in the city 
in which it convenes, than to come to 
our government's aid to the extent of at 
least fiftv thousand dollars? Or to the 
Red Cross."—/. O. O. P. Lodge Record, 
July, 1917. • 

"The Sovereign Camp [\\^oodmen of 
the ^^'orld] might buy several millions 
worth of these bonds. They are as good 
as the gold and the return is sure and 
safe. Sav about ten millions. It would 
be a fine advertisement for the Society." 
— TJie Dallas IVoodnian. June. 19 17. 



The millionaires of Eternity are the 
givers of Time. 



112 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



Labor Union Events 

As Clipped from the Daily Press 



Initiation Causes Laborer's Death. 

HmUington, Ind., June 7. — William Nel- 
son, laborer, died here tonight during ini- 
tiation into the Brotherhood of All Rail- 
road Emplo3'es, an insurance order. Dur- 
ing the ceremou}^ electricit}^ was used and 
it was at that stage of the initiatory work 
that Nelson died, it was said. He leaves a 
wife and two children. 

Hockin, Union Dynamiter, Ends Term in 
Prison. 

Chicago, 111., June 4. — Herbert S. Hockin, 
formerly secretary and treasurer of the In- 
ternational Association of Bridge and 
Structural Iron Workers, convicted with 
thirty-two others in Indianapolis in 1912 
as a dynamiter and sentenced to imprison- 
ment for six years, was released from the 
Leavenworth penitentiary yesterday. 

Two other men concerned in the dyna- 
mite plot were released from Leavenworth 
at the same time as Hockin. Fearing they 
might kill him, Hockin, it was said in the 
dispatch, slipped out of Leavenworth for 
an unknown destination. The men he be- 
trayed and their friends, it is said, have 
sworn vengeance upon him. Hockin's wife 
obtained a divorce while he was in prison. 

500 City Hall Workers Join Organized 
Labor. 

Chicago, June 1. — Five hundred clerks, 
stenographers, and other ofhce employes of 
the city hall became members of organized 
labor last night. 

All were members of the Official Civil 
Service Association of Illinois, an inde- 
pendent union organized last December. 
At a meeting held in the Masonic temple 
the association placed itself under the wing 
of the labor movement by submerging it- 
self in the Office Employes Association, a 
union affiliated with the American, Illinois, 
and Chicago federations of labor. 

"W'e joined the organized labor move- 
ment because we believe that whatever de- 
mands we have in mind will carry more 
weight when we go before the council 
finance committee or. any other municipal 
body concerned to present them," said 
James J. Danaher, president of the old as- 
sociation. 

Union Movie Operators Indicted. 

Chicago. Mav 22. — Indictments hitting^ 
about twelve officials and members of the 
following unions concerned in testimony of 
grafting and vandalism committed during 
the movie war will be voted to-day. it was 
forecast yesterday in the Criminal court 
building: 

Local 110. movino- picture onerators' un- 
ion, recognized by the Federation of Labor, 
Local 157, an "outlaw and fake" organiza- 
tion of onerators. Local 134 of the elect- 
rical workers. Local 381 of the fixture 
hangers. 

The county grand jury to-day will proba- 



bly conclude the inquiry into the dynamit- 
ing and throwing of stench bombs in a con- 
spiracy by which business men are said to 
have lost half a million dollars. 

The jury adjourned early yesterday be- 
cause it was "fed up" on testimony of van- 
dalism. Thirteen witnesses were heard. 
Barbers Sanction Strike Vote. 

Chicago, June 15. — James C. Shaughnes- 
sy, general organizer of the Journeymen 
Barbers LTnion, will arrive today from In- 
dianapolis. He is expected to bring with 
liim official sanction of the strike vote 
taken by the local union a month ago to 
enforce its demands for $17 a week and 
half of all receipts over $25 a week. Ray 
Williams, secretary of the local union de- 
clared yesterday that if a strike is called 
it will afTect 3,000 workmen in 1,500 shops. 
Union Agents Raid Barber Shop. 

Police of the Desplaines street station 
commandeered an automobile early to-da> 
and pursued and fired at four men, believed 
to be union agents, who had fired two 
shots through the front window of a bar- 
ber-shop at 833 West Madison street. The 
owner of the shop is said to have refused 
to join the barbers' union. 

The four men, riding in a black automo- 
bile, fired through the barber-ship window 
as they drove past the place at 1 :45 o'clock 
in the morning, some of the broken glass 
being scattered at the feet of William Hil- 
debfand, the night manager. He rushed 
into the street as the four men drove south 
in Green street. 

Would Bar Strikes During War. 

Washington, May 28. — Labor strife is to 
be abolished for the period of the war if a 
plan under consideration by the labor com- 
mittee of the council of national defense 
should be adopted. 

Lip to this time the committee, working 
in conjunction with Secretary of Labor 
Wilson, has arranged disputes between em- 
ployes and employers. The machinery 
available is inadequate and cumbersome, 
however, and it is sure to break down un- 
der the stress of the conditions which the 
war is producing. 

If the war is to be won, it is apparent 
there must be industrial peace. Secretarv 
Wilson is understood to be drafting a bill 
for consideration by Congress under which 
comnulsory investigation shall be reauired. 
A bill of this kind could not possibly get 
through Congress. 

The matter, therefore, must be settled in 
another way. The plan under considera- 
tion contemplates the insertion in every 
government contract for supplies of a pro- 
vision under which arbitration must be re- 
soried to in cnse of industrial difference. 

The arbitration board would consist of 
seven members, two representing labor, 
two representing capital and three repre- 
senting the public. 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



113 



It would be the duty of this board to re- 
ceive and investigate all complaints regard- 
ing conditions of labor in the plants hav- 
ing government contracts. The findings of 
the board would be obligatory upon the 
employers, and public opinion, it is be- 
lieved, would have the effect of forcing the 
men to continue work. 

If the contracts contain the provision 
proposed there will be in effect without the 
enactment of a law a complete system of 
compulsory settlement of industrial dis- 
putes. 

President Wilson recommended to Con- 
gress last summer and again in December 
that Congress pass a bill providing for the 
compulsory investigation of all disputes be- 
tween railroads and their employes. The 
recommendation has been allowed to slum- 
ber in the files of the committee on inter- 
state commerce. A like fate unquestionably 
awaits the bill Secretary Wilson is prepar- 
ing provided it should go to Congress. It 
is assumed Mr. Wilson would not draft the 
measure unless he had discussed it with the 
President and that the latter had given ap- 
proval to the proposition. 

A. F. of L. Warns of Strike Epidemic. 

Washington, D. C, June 20. — To bring 
down the prices of food and fuel and avert 
possible disturbances due to the sufferings 
of the poor is the object toward which the 
administration is directing all its energies. 

It was learned today that the most im- 
pressive warning of what may be expected 
unless something is done to curb the prof- 
iteering in the necessities of life and check 
the- rising cost of living has been conveyed 
to the administration b}^ the American Fed- 
erption of Labor. 

The federation officials informed the gov- 
ernment that the price of food and fuel 
must come down or wages must go up. 

The labor men intimated that unless the 
administration obtains effective legislation 
for the reduction of prices before July 1 an 
epidemic of strikes and even a national tie- 
up- in many industries mav be expected. 

The union leaders said that the working- 
man's pav no longer comes anywhere near 
meeting his cost of living and that It has 
been necessarv for labor to accept greatly 
reduced standards of living. 

Indict 13 Union Cigar Men. 

Chicago, June 15. — Thirteen members of 
the rif^armakers' Union, Progressive Local 
No. 527, were indicted by the grand jury to- 
day on charges of conspiracy to injure, de- 
face and destroy buildings and to injure 
and destroy the business of wholesale and 
retail cigar dealers. The indictments are 
the outgroMth of a sensational raid made 
under the direction of Assistant State's At- 
torney Chnrles C. Case, Jr.. on the head- 
quarters of the local on the west side. 

The defendants are charged with having 
conspired with Victor R. Le"^inson. presi- 
dent of the union; Harrv Fischel, vice- 
nrcsident; Hnrry Mendelson, recording 
secretary; Louis Aisuss, treasurer, and sev- 



eral other members of the union. The men 
are charged with having destroyed the 
property of the Landfield & Steele Com- 
pany, the Randall-Landfield Company, the 
LaKurba Cigar Company and twenty-eight 
retail cigar dealers. 

Assistant State's Attorney Case said 
there were a few isolated cases of extor- 
tion, but they were not presented to. the 
grand jury. He also said that an investi- 
gation of the books of the union showed 
some of the members also guilty of embez- 
zlement of union funds. 

Assails Crooks' Victims. 

Chicago, May 10. — State's Attorney 
Hoyne yesterday assailed as "cowards" 
Chicago business men who submit to the 
demands of labor blackmailers. He com- 
mented on the expose of,gunmen and bomb 
throwers who collected $500,000, it is 
charged, from owners of motion picture 
houses and from many building contrac- 
tors. 

"One would think," said "Sir. Hoyne, 
"that after the convictions of labor black- 
mailers last summer, a business man sub- 
jected to the threats of such gangs would 
complain to the state's attorney's ofifice. 
Still, when a man has been blackmailed it 
is hard to get him to admit it. 

"It has been proved that a jury of union 
men and ex-union men is just as ready to 
convict union blackmailers as it is any other 
criminal. Why victims won't complain is 
')evond me." . 

"The men who are doing the dynamiting 
pre all in one gang," Mr. Hoyne continued. 
"They are hired sluggers and bomb throw- 
ers. They go from one union to another, 
as Ihey are hired for 'jobs.'" 

Co-operative Stores for Chicago. 

Cliicago, July 18th.— A system of "co-oper- 
ati\e stores," launched ' and fostered by the 
labor movement of Illinois three years ago, 
has since that time cut down the cost of ne- 
cessities appreciably in every town in which 
such a store is located and is soon to be intro- 
duced in Chicago, according to an announce- 
ment made yesterday by John H. \\'alker, 
president of the Central States Co-operative 
Society, which controls the system. 

Mr. Walker is also president of the Illinois 
Federation of Labor and a member of the 
state council of defense. 

"The idea o'f the system is based on that 
underlying the operation of the Roachdale 
Co-operative svstem in Great Britain, which 
now does a business of $2,000,000,000 a year." 
said Mr. Walker. 

"At present the stores in the system deal in 
groceries, meats, clothing, millinery, coal, fur- 
niture, and hardware, selling these products 
as nearlv at cost as possible. Every cent of 
profits above the cost of operating the stores 
goes back to the purchasers, distributed among 
them according to the amount of their pur- 
chases within certain fixed times. No adver- 
tising is carried. \\'ages paid to employes are 
mucii higher than in other retail stores." 



114 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



Thirty Union Barbers Taken. 

Chicago, Jul}- 7. — Thirty union barbers and 
three bottles of an evil concoction that caused 
Capt. Morgan Collins to turn pale and gasp 
for air when he uncorked one of them were 
seized in a raid on the union headquarters at 
32 North Fifth avenue and taken to the cen- 
tral station yesterday. 

The raid was made for the purpose of ob- 
taining evidence in connection with a long 
series of window smashings and other vio- 
lence directed at non-union barber shops. 
Capt. Collins questioned all of the men ar- 
rested, and stated later that he had obtained 
an "inside line" on the workings of the union 
and the depredations committed. 

Among those arrested were Louis Buck and 
Ray WlHiams, president and secretary of the 
union. 

"The stuff in the, bottles evidently was for 
use in the making of 'stink bombs,' which have 
been thrown into non-union shops," said Capt. 
Collins. 

All of the barbers were released after the 
questioning. 

\\'illiams denied Capt. Collins' statements. 
I. W. W. Peril Rockford, 111. 

Rockford, III, July 5. — (Special.) — Enough 
dynamite to blow up the downtown district 
was found by the police two doors east of the 
I. W. W. headquarters at 304 East State 
street. 

Chief of Police Bargren believes it was 
planted by sympathizers of the slackers sent 
to prison today by Judge Landis. 
Unions Would Paralyze "Home Defense" 
Guards. 

Chicago, July 18th. — Labor leaders of the 
state are about to launch a campaign to in- 
duce members of trades unions to join the 
new "home defense" militia endorsed by the 
state defense council, it was revealed yester- 
day by John H. Walker, president of the 
Illinois Federation of Labor. 

Mr. Walker declared that every trades 
unionist in Illinois who is in a position to do 
so should become a member of some company 
of the organization, in order to insure that a 
!majority of the new militiamen will be in 
sympathy with the labor movement. This, 
he pointed out, "will prevent the big business 
interests from using the organization as a 
strike-breaking agency." 

Labor Thugs Beat Father and Son. 
Chicago, July 12th. — For thirty years Da- 
vid S. Kaye of 2419 North Washtenaw ave- 
nue has been an electrical contractor in Chi- 
cago. He has managed to make what he 
calls a "fair living" through the wiring of old 
residences and stores — jobs, he declares, that 
in no waA' have come into competition with 
union labor. 

Last Tuesday morning Kaye and his son 
Harold started work on one such "small job" 
in a store near California and Milwaukee 
avenues. They had been at work only a short 
time, Kaye said, when a representative of 
local 134 of the electrical workers' union 
came into the store. 

"I'll see you don't get away with this job," 



Kaye quotes the business agent as threat- 
ening. 

Kaye and his son continued their work in 
the store yesterday. 

"As we stepped out four men surrounded 
us,'' said Kaye last night. "Two grabbed 
Harold and one seized me. I broke away and 
ran to a near-by drug store to call the police. 

"One of the men followed me in and beat 
me over the head with a pistol. Harold also 
broke away and another man also pulled out 
a gun. I believe he attempted to shoot, but 
the cartridge didn't explode." 

Beer, Saloon, and Union Men May Ally. 

Chicago, July 9th. — Heretofore it has been 
the brewers who have taken the brunt of the 
battle for a wet Illinois, as far as beer is con- 
cerned. Apparently the brewers want help. 
They are calling on the retail saloon keepers 
to line up. A movement is on foot to or- 
ganize them for the fight which may see a 
decision in the April elections next year. 

the saloonkeepers have an organization 
known as the Cook County, Liquor Dealers' 
Association. There is also an Illinois Liquor 
Dealers' Association. Also there is a Brew- 
ers' Exchange. Working in general co-oper- 
ation with the liquor dealers' associations is 
the United Societies for Local Self-Govern- 
ment. 

The latest move of the brewing interests to 
strengthen their battle lines is to form an 
alliance of liquor labor unions and the liquor 
associations. It is said by one of authority 
that every saloonkeeper in Chicago will be 
asked by the unions to join either the union 
or the association. 

Street Car Strike Riot. 

Bloomington, 111., July 5.— The street car 
strike, which has been in progress peaceably 
for several weeks, developed into a riot to- 
night, following a speech by "Mother" Jones. 

One car was taken from the rails and 
placed across the railroad tracks, several con- 
ductors and motormen were badly beaten, and 
one man, said to have been in the crowd 
which was attacking the cars, was shot 
through the neck. 

The mob started for the power plant which 
operates the street cars, commercial lighting 
and power system, and Illinois Traction sys- 
tem cars, but the employes, notified of their 
coming, shut down the plant and the city is 
without light or power, except for the mu- 
nicipal plant which furnishes lights for the 
streets. 

I. W. W. Miners Strike. 

Globe, Ariz., July 1. — Ninety-two per cent 
of the copper miners employed at Miami and 
Inspiration, Ariz., quit work this afternoon 
in response to a strike call, according to a 
statement issued here late to-day by leaders 
of the Metal Mine Workers' Industrial union, 
which is affiliated with the Industrial Work- 
ers of the World. 

Butte, Mont., June 27. — Mines in Butte are 
nearer a complete shutdown to-night than 
they have been in three years. All machin- 
ists, boilermakers and blacksmiths employed 
in the mines quit work to-day, leaving in the 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



115 



mines the carpenters, engineers and some min- 
ers who have been at work since the Metal 
Mine Workers' union struck for higher wages 
and improved working conditions. 

Bisbee, Ariz., June 27. — The tirst day of the 
strike called in the copper mines in this dis- 
trict by the Metal Mine Workers' Industrial 
union ended with oO per cent of the men out. 
This was admitted by the producers. Five 
thousand men normally are employed in the 
mines of the three companies affected by the 
strike. 

Butte, Mont., July 6th.— Efforts to end the 
strike of the Metal Mine Workers' union, 
which, with the strike of the electricians, has 
all but closed the copper and zinc mines of 
the Butte district, reached the stage to-night 
where a committee of the miners' union went 
into conference with representatives of the 
International Mine, Mill, and Smeltermen's 
union to discuss the absorption of the miners 
by the International Mine, Mill, and Smelter- 
men's union. 



1847— JULY 20th— 1917. 



Believers are the doers. The doubter 
is never a builder. Power is always ac- 
cording to faith. 



SittflmL 



MASONIC JUGGLING. . 

"The matter of healing the breach be- 
tween French and Anglo-Saxon Masonry 
will be very soon the most important 
topic before the American Craft. If 
reconciliation can be brought about, w^ith- 
out humiliation of either party to the 
controversy, and without recjuiring that 
either shall give up what is deemed es- 
sential or matter of conscience, the gain 
to universal Masonry will be inestima- 
ble." — American Freemason, April, 19 17. 

Remembering that French Masonry 
does not require belief in any deity and 
that belief in a "Supreme Being" is one 
of the immovable "landmarks" of Eng- 
lish Masonry, this is bound to be one of 
the most interesting spectacles of Ma- 
sonic juggling and tight rope walking 
presented for some years. It will take 
some acrobatic feat to perform success- 
fully all the "ifs" of the above proposi- 
tion and we anticipate watching the show 
with interest. 



It is said that one gallon of melted 
gold- — fifteen pounds — is worth v$4,- 

74571- 

A gallon of gold from a number of 

our friends will be gratefully received. 



General Secretary Celebrates His 70th 
Birthday. 




WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS. • 

To be seventy years young is some- 
thing far more cheerful and hopeful 
than to be forty years old. 

— Oliver Wendell Holmes. 
"True to all truth the world denies, 

Not tongue-tied for its gilded sin ; 
Not always right in all men's eyes. 

But faithful to tlie li^ht within." 



EAGLE ''CHARITY.' 



Red Tape Relieves Order From Paying 
Benefits. 
A member of an Aerie became ill and 
asked his brother, who was not a mem- 
ber of the order, to notify his lodge of 
his condition, so that he might receive 
sick l)enefits. His brother neglected to 
do as requested and the sick man lost his 
benefits because the "Grand Worthy 
President" ruled that he had erred in 
sending notice through his brother who 
was not an Fagle. Flad he made the 
same request of a brother Fagle. who 
had neglected it. the du.es would, never- 
theless, have been paid. There was no 
doubt about the illness, or the sick man*s 



116 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



standing in tlie order, or the fact that 
he had paid for benefits in just such a 
time as this. By a technical red tape 
requirement, he was deprived of his 
rights. The Eagle Magazine, for July, 
1917, states the case as follows: "A 
member was injured in a mine. He re- 
quested his brother to notify the Secre- 
tary of his Aerie. The brother neglected 
to do so. Several weeks later the mem- 
ber called upon the Secretary, inquiring 
into the reason for his delay in forward- 
ing his sick-benefits. If the Aerie deter- 
mines that notice was not received, sick 
benefits are not due. The law placing 
responsibility upon the Aerie when a 
member is requested to notify the offi- 
cers of the sickness of a brother mem- 
ber, and fails to do so, does not apply in 
this case." 



In the ''Eastern Star News" depart- 
ment of the July 2nd Masonic Home 
Journal, U. S. Grant is credited with the 
declaration "Righteousness exalteth a 
nation, but sin is a reproach to any peo- 
ple." If the editor of the "Eastern Star 
News" were as familiar with the Scrip- 
tures as he is with those portions garbled 
for lodge use, he would doubtless have 
recognized this as one of Solomon's 
proverbs (Prov. 14:34) rather than a 
saying of Grant. The "good enough" re- 
ligion of Masonry seems to be ignorant 
enough when it comes to handling the 
Word of God. 

General Grant's opinion of Masonry 
was expressed in his autobiography 
where he said : "All secret, oathbound 
political parties are dangerous to any na- 
tion, no matter how pure or how patri- 
otic the motives and principles which first 
bring them together." 

We have been a monthly reader of 
The Royal Neighbor for the past two 
years, hoping to find something useful in 
it. At last our vigilance has been re- 
warded. We are informed, in case the 
chimney catches on fire, to pour down it 
enough sand to put the fire out. 

Masonry should be looked upon as a 
priceless possession. — Masonic Chronic- 
ler. 

That is the way we look upon it. 
About thirty cents, we should say, would 
be a fair valuation. 



ACCREDITED SUPPORT WANTING. 

The principal address in an Elk memo- 
rial service was delivered by the rector 
of a Protestant Episcopal church in a 
city of the Middle West. To many of 
his hearers he would, of course, be 
something like an authority on church 
history; hence, an oracular utterance re- 
specting the ancient church would be ac- 
cepted. Such auditors would not care 
for the titles of books where they could 
find proofs of any statement in the ad- 
dress. At the same time, if he himself 
felt no danger of dispute, or of doubt 
dulling the effects of his words, the 
speaker would omit references of that 
kind. In fairness, then, the omission 
cannot be sharply criticized. Yet this 
reticence cannot receive strong approval, 
when the statement is a novel and start- 
ling addition to accredited church his- 
tory. Then, nothing can be more rea- 
sonable than sensitiveness to the omission 
of reliable proofs; especially, when the 
novel statement emanates from a source 
already convicted of unreliability, like 
the modern secret system which is w^ell 
recognized as precisely such a source, not 
only by its most studious opponents, but 
also by its best informed adherents. 

Among these may be named Profes- 
sor Parvin of Iowa State University, 
who was at different times grand master 
and grand secretary of the grand lodge. 
He seems to support fully our inclusion 
of best informed adherents, when he thus 
describes a not unknown class of se- 
cret society orators : "Such oracles are 
always proclaiming as Masons, Enoch 
the translated, Solomon the wise, and the 
Saints John of Christian sanctity. It is 
amusing to note how they always enroll 
among their members the noble and the 
good of all nations. . . . Certainly, to all 
such heresies we may apply the injunc- 
tion of David in his lament over Saul, 
'Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the 
streets of Askeon.' Such tales will 
surely, sooner or later, return to our 
hurt, as they should. . . . Solomon was 
no Mason. . . . He knew no more of the 
mysteries of Freemasonry than did the 
beautiful Queen of Sheba." 

To this confirmation of our claim that 
some of the l^est informed members re- 
gard their order as an unreliable source 
of historic information may be added 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



117 



that of the ^Masonic historian, 2^Ioore, 
who declares that ''every one who knows 
anything about it, is aware that the pre- 
tended charter of A. D. 916 is pure fic- 
tion, and that the effort to trace the his- • 
tory of the order to King Solomon, and 
make him 'Our ^lost Excellent Grand 
Master,' is an insult to every member of 
the order. . . . The utterer of such stuff 
can only plead ignorance as an excuse." 
In his standard Masonic work, "Ahi- 
man Rezon," Dr. Dalcho, — who com- 
piled the ^lasonic Constitutions of South 
Carolina. — both recognizes and condemns 
unreliable secret society history, by af- 
firming that ''Neither Adam, nor Xoah, 
nor Ximrod, nor Aloses, nor Joshua, nor 
David, nor Solomon, nor John the Bap- 
tist, nor John the Evangelist, belonged 
to the Alasonic order. . . . There is no 
record, sacred or profane, to induce us 
to believe that these holy and distin- 
guished men were Freemasons : and our 
traditions do not go back to their days. 
To assert that they were Freemasons, 
may 'make the vulgar stare,' but it will 
rather excite the contempt than the ad- 
miration of the wise." Still nearer at 
hand is the support of the grand lodge 
of Illinois, in the principal city of whose 
jurisdiction this magazine is published. 
The following sharp rebuke is included 
in one of its reports : "While it is true 
that the fools are not all dead, it may be 
safely said that he who teaches that 
Adam, Seth, or Solomon was a Freema- 
son sins against light and knowledge." 
Mystic Order of Christians. 
If we have sufficiently supported our 
representation of the better informed 
class of secret society members, by means 
of that method which the memorial ora- 
tor made no attempt to use, we regard it 
as not impossible that, in the same act, 
we have also introduced him as one who 
may perhaps be found among the class 
described. After first listening to his 
own historical teaching, we shall then 
turn to ask corroboration for it where 
reliable church history is abundant and 
well accredited. He thus discourses of 
"the secrets of the ^Tystic Order of 
Christians," which was ''none other than 
the early church." This order, the an- 
cient church, took its rise in the life of 
the "great Jewish reformer," and the 
Pagan government was hostile to "such 



reforms" as now constitute the "funda- 
mental teachings" of the Elk order. Of 
the Mystic Order of Christians the ora- 
tor reports, that, 'A\'hen they held their 
meetings they were compelled to assem- 
ble in secret because the government per- 
secuted them, and they were also forced 
to inaugurate a secret code. They had 
signs, grips, passwords, signs of distress,' 
in order to test what they called true dis- 
cipleship. This was none other than the 
early church that had its origin in the 
life of the great Jewish Reformer, who 
taught certain fundamental teachings, 
some of which, to-day, are the funda- 
mental teachings of our order: such as, 
Charity, Justice, Brotherly Love and 
Fidelity. This secret work was neces- 
sary for protection from impostors who 
wished to know the secrets of the mystic 
order of Christians, so that they might 
betray them into the hands of the Pagan 
government, which was hostile to such 
reforms." 

Since the speaker has omitted refer- 
ence to any of the numerous available 
works on Church History, or to innu- 
merable volumes of comment on the 
Scriptures, or to illimitable libraries of 
Christian literature, his hearers are left 
to seek details and verifications for them- 
selves. Far be it from us to aver that 
not one little book can be found on some 
remote shelf to reward diligent search 
for what, so far as we have read, is dis- 
coverable only in a newspaper report of 
an Elk address. Wc, however, think it 
remarkable that scholarly commentators 
on the Book of Acts find no use for this 
side light on its contents. The eminent 
group of Church Historians also appears 
to overlook this feature of the life of 
early Christians. Sermons, essays, and 
general Christian literature singularly 
fail to draw upon the resource of vivid 
illustration. 

Close beside the fallen throne and 
ruined palace of imperial persecution, 
near the arena where martyrs died, lies 
the rock-hewn tomb of the persecuted 
church. It is an impressive silence that 
reigns in the Roman Catacombs, where 
early (liristians found retirement for 
pra}er. and wliere they entombed in 
niches of tlie walls, tenderly sepultured 
remains of steadfast victims of Pagan 
persecution. Innumerable are the in- 



118 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



scriptions and countless the duplicated 
symbols, }-et none verify the secret so- 
ciety assertion. Like the Tel-el- Amarna 
tablets or the buried decorations of Pom- 
peii, after barbarian violence that deso- 
lated Rome these yoluminous stone rec- 
ords of ancient church history lay hid- 
den, unyisited for centuries, and at length 
almost forgotten. More recently ex- 
plored, they have revealed Christian life 
in days of early devotion and years of 
saintly martyrdom. They reveal lofty 
faith,' and -hope, and love. But when 
this new voice speaks they remain silent. 
Yet in the Catacombs, if anywhere. 
Christians worshiped together in seclu- 
sion. Here, too, is the well-preserved 
collection of Christian symbolism. 
Thread these long avenues that are like 
interminable galleries of a deserted mine ; 
this labyrinth from which none dares 
hope to return without a guide ; scrutinize 
the inscribed and pictured walls ; yet no- 
■ where will you find in this long buried 
cemetery of the saints and martyrs of 
ancient Rome, symbol, or word, or sign, 
to make less than sacrilege the intrusion 
of unchristian teachings and immoral 
symbols. "Here the lamented dead in 
dust shall lie," and here let the blatant 
voice of profanation sink, awed and 
shamed, into reverent silence. 



The wages of a fellow craft is largely 
made up with the reading of Masonic lit- 
erature. If you are not reading this 
class of literature you are not getting 
your just dues. — Texas Freemason. 

''Wages" is not the right word. Try 
reading it with sentence substituted. 



CORRECTIONS. 

In the July Cynosure, page 89, under 
the heading ''Lodge Statistics," the sub- 
head should have read "Non-Fraternal 
Insurance Societies" and on the follow- 
ing page the subhead should have been, 
"Fraternal Insurance Orders." . 



• Through an error the name of Rev. J. 
F. Heemstra of Chicago was omitted 
from the published list of those who 
v^ere received into Corporate member- 
ship at the Annual Meeting on May 
28th, 19 1 7. 



£tm of 0nv Work. 

TRACTS FOR SOLDIERS. 

We have had two calls, since our last 
issue, for tracts for distribution among 
soldiers. One call came from a Christian 
worker located close to one of the great 
military camps established in this coun- 
try. The other was from a tract dis- 
tributing league in England. We are 
very much in need of $500 for our "tract 
fund" 'that we may be able to respond 
to these and other calls. The supply of 
some of our most used tracts is ex- 
hausted and cannot be replenished until 
funds are received for that purpose. 

These rec|uests for tracts come with 
special appeal at this time. It will be 
recalled that Masonry recovered from 
what people supposed was its death blow 
during the distractions of the Civil War, 
and that the Spanish-American War was 
a heyday for lodges generally. 

We thank the friends who have gen- 
erously contributed to our needs during 
the past month, and also the one who 
has pledged a gift of $100. There are 
many others from whom we ought to 
hear, and we are praying that God will 
lay the burden of the tract fund and of 
the general needs of the Association 
tipon their hearts. Pray over it, friends. 



COVENANTERS HOLD CONFER- 
ENCE ON LODGES. 

At the General Synod of the Reformed 
Presbyterian Church, held in June at 
Sterling, Kan., ofie evening session was 
given over to a Conference on Secret So- 
cieties. The Christian Nation reports 
that "a very large audience was pres- 
ent." Rev. Thomas C, McKnight, one 
of our Directors, was chairman of the 
Conference, and read the Masonic oaths 
from the cypher work published by a Ma- 
sonic publishing house. 

Rev. W. C. Coleman, of White Cot- 
tage, Ohio, gave "A Study of Arnold's 
'History and Philosophy of Freemason- 
ry' " and showed how the symbolism of 
Freemasonry conceals a vile philosophy 
designed primarily to conceal the truth. 
Always the obvious meaning is the 
wrong meaning. Their emblems, the 
sf|uare, compass and triangle, one would 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



119 



conclude, meant a square life, a full life, 
etc. In point of fact, all of these things 
are a part of the symbolism of the im- 
moral and obscene hidden meaning of- 
the mysteries of Freemasonry. One can 
test these things out by considering the 
sort of ethics they produce. 

Rev. J. H. Pritchard gave ''A Study in 
Pike's 'Morals and Dogma.' " He read 
from the book categorical statements that 
Masonry has a god, and that Masonry 
is a religion ; that Christ's teachings are 
said to be more nearly perfect than those 
of Socrates. He proceeded to show that 
not only is Masonry a religion, but it is 
a false religion in that it misinterprets 
the Bible at every touch and because it 
claims to be an improvement on the 
Bible. Mr. Pike's book teaches that it 
is folly to say that there is anything 
Christian about Masonry. This book 
also says that Masonry gathers to its 
heart all the teachings of all the false re- 
ligions of all the sages of all the ages. 
It puts all "sacred" books on an equal- 
ity. In the last place, Masonry is a 
filthy religion, as this book clearly dem- 
onstrates. It is a religion, it is a false 
religion, it is a filthy religion — and glo- 
ries in all three. 

Rev. F. F. Reade delivered an address 
entitled "By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know 
Them." He. said that the previous speak- 
ers had showed the worst there is in the 
lodge. He proposed to show the best 
there is in secrecy. And the first best 
thing in secrecy is Selfishness. The 
lodge makes you pay for all you get. 
The second best thing in secrecy is Dis- 
honesty. A member is dishonest in his 
attitude toward his brethren. The lodge 
is dishonest in that it makes men pay 
for vanities. The third best thing in se- 
cerecy is Pride — pride bred by their high 
sounding titles. Just the reverse of the 
humility taught by Christianity. The 
fourth and last best thing in secrecy is 
Foolishness. Christianity teaches men 
to be generous, to be honest, to be hum- 
ble, and to be wise. 



der various names, into the Sabbath 
schools. Mrs. Smith makes a strong 
protest against tliis organized effort to 
steal the boys from the church and points 
out the duty of Christians to protest 
[>oldly against these orders. 

Mrs. Smith and her sister. Miss Eliza 
F. Potter, have been long time friends 
of this Association. 



In the JVcsIcycm MctJiodist of March 
2Tst, Mrs. H. R. Smith, Sr., of Leon- 
ardsburg, Ohio, has a lengthy article, 
"The Sin of Silence," treating with the 
persistent efforts to introduce lodges, un- 



CYNOSURES WANTED. 

June 22,, 1917, 
We are glad for the many copies of 
the Christian Cynosure, Converted 
Catholic, Home Light, and valuable 
tracts sent to us for distribution by read- 
ers of the Cynosure. Some who send 
fail to give their full addresses and we 
are therefore unable to acknowledge 
them. We would be pleased to ha\e ^Ir. 

A. J. Meck's address. 

We find the Christian Cynosure is 
unknown to many here in Columbia. To- 
day we called with the Cynosure at the 
homes of eleven of the ministers of Co- 
lumbia. It was entirely unknown to 
eight of them. Four of the pastors are 
members of one or more lodges. 

Thursday evening, June 22d, Rev. \\\ 

B. Stoddard, of Washington, D. C, de- 
livered a very interesting address here 
at the Mennonite Home Mission. \\t 
feel much encouraged and trust we may 
be better prepared to tell others of the 
evils of the lodge. 

Do not forget, readers of the C^'NO- 
SURE, that your back numbers of the 
Cynosure, Home Light, Converted Cath- 
olic, tracts, etc., can be put to good use 
in the work here through our ]\Iission. 

C. B. Byer. 

274 S. 4th St., Columbia, Pa. 

THE LION OF THE TRIBE OF JUDAH 

\\'illimantlc, Conn., July 5, 1917. 

When Brother Kelsey called the atten- 
tion of a college president to the fact 
that Christ is rejected in the work of the 
Masonic order he says that the gentle- 
man turned on him and said, "How about 
the Eion of the Tribe of Judah ? That 
stands for Christ in Masc^n-y." Does it? 

Let the illustrious Masonic writer, Al- 
bert G. Mackey, answer. - On page z^S 
of his "Lexicon of hreemasonr}," he 
says, "The whole of Palestine was some- 
times called the Land of ludah because 



120 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



Judah was a distinguished tribe in ob- 
taining possession of the country. The 
tribe of Judah bore a Hon in their stand- 
ard and hence the ]\Iasonic alhision to 
the Lion of the Tribe of Judah." 

J. A. CONANT. 

Brother Kelsey's article did not state 
what his answer was to that Masonic 
college president. 

In ]\Iackey's "Encyclopedia of Free- 
masonry'' it is stated that there was a 
time in which the phrase "lion of the 
tribe of Judah" was masonically inter- 
preted as a reference to Christ, but "now 
in the symbolism of Ancient Craft Ma- 
sonry, where the lion is introduced, as 
in the third degree, in connection with the 
'lion of the tribe of Judah,' he becomes 
simply a symbol of the resurrection/' 

Alasonry is a system of lies and "ev- 
ery lie is inconsistent with every other 
lie," and that makes it very difficult to 
corner a smart Mason. When w^e con- 
template the ingenuity displayed by Ma- 
sonic writers claiming one thing at one 
time and another thing at another time, 
we are profoundly impressed with the 
wisdom of Nathaniel Clover, who said 
that he looked upon the system as "Sa- 
tan's masterpiece." 

The Coast Beacon of Pass Christian, 
Miss., in its issue of July 7th spoke thus 
of an address delivered by Southern 
Agent F. J. Davidson: 

"Rev. Francis Davidson, colored, of 
New Orleans, who is now the pastor in 
charge of the First Baptist colored 
church of this city, delivered a lengthy 
address at that church on Friday evening 
last, which was heard by a number of 
white people. 

"The speaker's subject was the "Sun- 
nyside of the Negro's Life in the South," 
which he presented in a very impres- 
sive manner, citing facts and incidents 
to sustain his arguments, and making 
his lengthy address interesting all 
through. 

"He endeavored to impress upon his 
colored brethren that upon each indi- 
vidual depended principally whether or 
not life would be a success or a failure, 
and he laid special stress upon the ob- 
servance of a strict moral and religious 
life by all. 

"He took a rap at the many secret so- 



cieties that are formed among the Ne- 
groes by oily tongued organizers, who 
soon depart with the coin, and leave a 
source of mischief behind, and in this 
we feel that he was absolutely correct. 
The attendance of colored people was 
not as large as it should have been, for 
the address was a good one for them to 
hear." 



Professor J. R. Millin, of the Knox- 
ville College at Knoxville, Tennessee, 
writes : 

"The Lodge is the Devil's wooden 
horse, and the church, not profiting by 
the experience of ancient Troy, has been 
stupid enough to take it within its walls. 
T fear Greeks though bearing gifts.' 
But the voice of wisdom was not heard. 
Foolish Troy! But what shall we say 
of the church? Jesus, at Luke 16:8, dis- 
plays the red flag of warning; but the 
church, unheeding, perists in bringing 
the Devil's wooden horse within its 
walls. And what then? The church, 
half paralyzed and bewildered, lies down 
on its back and cries for the peripatetic 
evangelist ! Has the church read the 
Book of Acts? Has the church read the 
seven letters to 'the seven churches' of 
Asia? Yes? And then dallies with the 
Lodge ! The church would do well to 
read Homer again." 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARb. 

July has been a very unusual month. 
Rain has been on the program much of 
the time. Crops in this section are un- 
usually good, but will be spoiled largely 
unless there is a change in weather. I 
am finding opportunity for all the meet- 
ings that my strength will permit. The 
Buckeye State responds well. Since ar- 
riving in Youngstown, Ohio, July 5th, I 
have taken over sixty subscriptions for 
the Cynosure and substantial contribu- 
tions to our work have been given at 
four of the meetings held. 

Elder Taylor was announced to speak 
to the friends at the Old Folks' Home, 
Neffville, Pa., but he insisted that I fill 
his appointment, saying that he could 
speak at a later date when I could not 
be present. , Several expressed apprecia- 
tion of my visit. 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



At Lebanon, Pa., and country nearby, 
I found open doors for addresses in 
Churches of the Brethren and in Faith 
Tabernacle. They gave the encourage- 
ment expected. A visit at the home of 
our old friend, Brother John White, at 
Highspire, Pa., was much enjoyed. He 
has not grown weary in well doing but 
manifests the same zeal in the good 
cause as in former years. Returning to 
Washington, D. C, I found our Free 
Methodist friends rejoicing that they 
had secured a commodious building for 
a new home for work there. I attended 
and took part in the "grand opening" on 
Sabbath, July ist. It is to be hoped 
many will be saved from the lodge and 
from other sins in this new home. Upon 
arrival at Youngstown, Ohio, at 12 130 
a. m. I had to go to four hotels before I 
fovmd accommodations, and even then I 
had to pay double prices for what I re- 
ceived. This was a trial to me, but good 
friends have cared for me since. Their 
kindness has more than compensated for 
the trial of the "weary pilgrim" that 
night. 

A welcome awaited me at Columbiana, 
Louisville, and Canton, Ohio, in fact, all 
along the way. I spoke to good aud- 
iences at the Leetonia and East Lewis- 
town Mennonite churches on Sabbath, 
July 8th. An unusually large number of 
young people attended the evening serv- 
ice. I dropped in at meetings in the 
Pentacostal Mission, in Canton and the 
Church of the Brethren, in Akron, which 
were helpful. Last Sabbath I spoke in 
the Free Methodist. and Wesleyan Meth- 
odist churches, in Akron, and it was 
thought many were helped to a better 
understanding of antilodge truth. Ak- 
ron is known as the "rubber town." Some 
thirty rubber firms are engaged in busi- 
ness there, and the town is "stretching 
out" at an astonishing rate. A writeup 
of this town in McClure's Magazine for 
July is entitled "Standing Room Only." 
Many devilish things always come where 
money and fast moving people are found 
in numbers. It was a privilege to aid 
some here who were willing to listen to 
the truth regarding the lodge deceits 
that destroy many. 

My lecture last evening was delivered 
in the Bethel Mennonite church near 



W^adsworth, Ohio. I missed our friend, 
A. M. Overholt, who for some thirty 
years was a faithful supporter in our 
work. I was happy to find that his chil- 
dren are willing to aid now that their 
father has gone to his eternal reward. 
It is not true of every family that the 
children take the places of the parents 
when they are promoted. While the 
lodges have a strong grip on the people 
of Wadsworth, the number of those rec- 
ognizing their evil nature is also in- 
creased. Notwithstanding the rain that 
came at the hour appointed for the lec- 
ture, quite a number gathered. I am to 
speak to those who will come to the Old 
Folks' Home in Marshallville, this eve- 
ning. To-morrow evening my appoint- 
ment is in the Orrville Mennonite church. 
Owing to the sickness of our Ohio State 
president. Rev. Martin L. Wagner, and 
to other conditions that obtain at this 
time, it is thought best to omit the usual 
midsummer conference and instead to 
push lecturing and the securing of 
Cynosure subscriptions. Shall we not 
secure the thousand or more new Cyno- 
sure subscriptions so much needed in 
the furtherance of the work at this time ? 
If each will make a little extra effort the 
combined result will exceed our fondest 
hopes. Let us be faithful and do "our 
bit." Surely with a world moving at 
such a tremendous pace, this is no time 
to hold back. The time of the coming 
of our Lord hastens. 



Mr. R. A. McCoy of Princeton, Indi- 
ana, one of the oldest friends of the 
Cynosure, writes under date of May 
14th, of an interesting occurrence in his 
city. Rev. M. S. McMillen, pastor of 
the Reformed Presbyterian church, was 
invited to address the Men's Bible Class 
in the Methodist Episcopal church on 
May 13th, on the subject of "Organized 
Secrecy." He spoke from the fifteenth 
chapter of St. John, showing the fallacy 
of the lodge teaching of the "Father- 
hood of God and the brotherhood of 
man." He showed the class the impos- 
sibility of Christians. Jews and Turks 
worshiping the same Father around the 
Masonic altar. 

This shows the great change that is 
going on in society through the leaven- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



iiig intiuences of the truth, though its 
representatives are comparatively few. 
"I well remember," says Air. McCoy, 
"when living in AV^ashington, Iowa, of 
putting up bills advertising that Presi- 
dent J. Blanchard and P^-of. C. A. Blan- 
chard were to speak on the lodge ques- 
tion and having these bills torn down." 
It seems to him a great advance to have 
his pastor invited to give an antisecrecy 
address to the Alethodists and he closes 
with this verse, "Fear not, little flock; 
for it is your Father's good pleasure to 
give you the kingdom." 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Dear Cyxosure : 

The Lord used me mightily in Raw- 
lison, Arkansas, to expose all the sinful 
work of the Devil. When, in a humble, 
loving way the people are shown the 
A\'ord,they begin to see the light. Almost 
of the people have been converted, but 
they have not been taught to live a con- 
secrated life. They think that it is im- 
possible to live free from sin. 

A sister asked me to tell her how to 
live free from sin. I told her to watch 
all the evil temptations that came to her 
mind and pray that she enter not into 
temptation. I said, You watch all this 
week the different things that the temp- 
ter brings to you and whatever he brings 
the Lord will touch your conscience and 
say, That is wrong, don't do that. Then 
pray and you will be able to resist. One 
day shortly after that she wanted five 
eggs to use in a cake, but she only had 
two eggs in the house. She decided to 
bake the cake some other time and, go- 
ing out into the garden to work, 
found a hen's nest with three eggs in it. 
The Devil said, There are the three eggs 
you need, you have two more in the 
house, now you can bake your cake. She 
said, Xow, Devil., I know that what Sis- 
ter Roberson said about your tempting 
]jeople is right. These eggs don't belong 
to me because I have no chickens. I will 
call my next door neighbor and give her 
what belongs to her. After she had given 
the eggs to her neighbor, she said that 
she went back into her own house and 
shouted ''Glory to God" for victory over 
sin. That is the way to live the victori- 
ous life. 

The people at Rawlison had been beat- 



en out of so much money by the lodge 
grafting professors and preachers that 
they were disgusted, and were glad that 
I came with the tracts and showed them 
what the Word of God says against 
lodges. They were so glad for the tract, 
"Why I left the Masons" and the book- 
let "Freemasonry at a Glance." A Ma- 
son went to a sister at Marianna and 
took her book away from her. She told 
him that I had been there three weeks 
and she told the whole congregation that 
if they wanted books, to let her know 
and she would order them. The Masons 
said, We don't want her books, we want 
her. She replied, "Why then, did you 
not get her while she was here?" He 
said, Wq did send a man after her, but 
she would not come out. I remember 
one day while I was staying at Mrs. Lil- 
lie Hightower's house a man came there 
and asked "Where is the large lady that 
stays here?" Mrs. Hightower said, 
"Who? Sister Roberson?" "Yes," he 
said. She said, "She is not in, but her 
husband is." He said, "I want to see 
her." On the next day he came back and 
knocked at the door. I went to the door 
and he said, "I am the man that has your 
husband's suit of clothes to clean and I 
charged him $1.25 for the job. I have 
not got them ready yet, but if you will 
let me have a dohar I will knock off the 
twenty-five cents." Sister Hightower 
said, "Sister Roberson, this is the man 
that asked for you yesterday and he is 
not up to any good. Let him bring your 
husband's clothes and get the money. It 
is not due until he delivers the clothes." 
He said, "Lady, I am no dead beat. I 
owe a man a dollar over here at the shop 
and thought, if I could get it here, it 
would save me a trip back to town." 
Airs. Hightower said, "You came here 
yesterday asking for the large lady, or 
lodge lady. I see you are up to some 
deviltry. Go on back and get the clothes 
and then you shall have the money." 
When he left the house he never went 
near the shop, which was right across the 
street and where he said the man was 
waiting for the dollar. I think he must 
have been the man they sent to get me. 
I don't know why they have failed thus 
far to get me. They sent four of the 
leading pastors to the church to wait on 
me, but they never said a word to me. I 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



123 



said that night that if anyone wanted 
books I would send an order to the 
National Christian Association and get 
them. One man said, "I never saw a- 
woman that knew Masonry before." 

There was one man in the Marianna 
meeting who was a 33rd degree Mason. 
He was also a Methodist preacher and a 
school teacher and he came to the altar 
for prayer that God would forgive him 
and deliver him from the lodge curse. 
He cried to God for deliverance and for- 
giveness, for, he said, I have taken many 
men into this idol worship. We prayed 
for him. He owns a big farm in the 
black belt. He came to see me before we 
left Marianna and said, *T have known 
for a long time that this thing was wrong, 
but I have greater light on it now than 
ever. When a man is in a trap he can- 
not realize his danger as someone on the 
outside can. He showed me his big gold 
Masonic pin and said God help and save 
me from this awful thing. He wTOte 
to a friend of his and asked her to tell 
all to pray for him that the Lord would 
save him from the power of the lodge. 

God bless all the Christian workers of 
the National Christian Association and 
all the readers of the Cynosure. Pray 
for me. \Mien I go to the train they 
watch me. They killed a man at Rawli- 
son ten years ago for preaching the 
truth. He was shot down and died in 
two hours. I said to them : I am going 
to take my Bible and condemn sin. HI 
die, let me die. I am not going to abuse 
any person. I am going to hit the Devil 
straight in the face with the Word of 
God and since the Word is a lamp it will 
show all of us how we stand with God. 
No one meddled with me. The men 
laughed when I told their secrets and 
showed them "Freemasonry at a Glance" 
and some of them came to me and l)ought 
books. The white people were very nice 
to me. They said they enjoyed the serv- 
ices and they contributed in the offering 
that was taken up. God bless all in 
Jesus' name. The Lord Jesus Christ be 
with his children. Amen. 

LtZZTE Ror.F.RSON. 



A correspondent writes : The March 
number is especially fine, and has several 
important articles, which I want to get 
before the eves of some friends. I would 



so much like to set some of these fine 
men to thinking, but for various reasons 
I have to go about it slowly. 

I feel sure I have helped a very dear 
young friend to get a clear conviction on 
the matter during the past few months. 
I have had no cliance to talk with him 
personally since giving him our literature' 
several months ago, but I feel sure of his 
convictions from a statement he has 
made recently in public. 

REPORT OF SOUTHERN AGENT. 

K]iV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

One hundred and forty-one years ago, 
July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence was signed, at Independence 
Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and 
the heroic struggle for real democracy in 
the world began. The thirteen original 
colonies have since become forty-eight 
sovereign states, besides the District of 
Columbia, the territories of Hawaii 
Alaska, Porto Rico, the Philippine Isl- 
ands and others. Our country like the 
land of Canaan flows- with milk and 
honey. By the providence of Almighty 
God the Civil War struck the shackles 
of human slavery from the limbs of 
4,000,000 slaves, but can America in 
truth boast of being a Christian nation, 
a free country, when one-twelfth of her 
native and law abiding citizens are segre- 
gated, ostracized, disfranchised, and dis- 
criminated against in iniiumerable v/ays, 
even in the courts of justice? They are 
divested of their property, their women 
are outraged, their men are flayed alive, 
burned at the stake and their bodies dis- ' 
membered for souvenirs by men, women 
and even children while the wretched 
victim is screeching in agony and pain. 
Women and children of tender vears 
crowd special excursion trains to witness 
the inhuman and barbarous lynching of 
negroes who are sometimes not guilty of 
crime. Evil minded and designing white 
men and women have been known to 
feign that they are outraged, and, with- 
out the slightest evidence of guilt or 
even a pretense of court trail, their de- 
fenseless and helpless negro victims 
have been innniced upon and lynched. Is 
this trul}- a free and independent coun- 
try when judges, governors, legislators 
and prosecuting attorneys are solemnly 
bound together by abominable oaths 



124 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



and penalties to hail, ever conceal, and 
never reveal the secrets of a brother 
lodge member no matter how hideous 
the crime? How can men, posing- as 
ministers of the Gospel of Jesus Christ 
preach a whole, clean, and saving gos- 
pel, when they are bound soul and body 
to the gambler, the saloon-keeper, the 
adulterer and the infidel? How can 
courts render impartial judgments and 
governors rule with justice while they 
are bound by their lodge oaths? 

In the South the most discriminating 
and unjust laws are enacted against the 
negroes. Necessities of life are sold to 
them at exorbitant prices, while their 
wages are the lowest in the scale. They 
are arrested, convicted and put in the 
chain gang or on the convict farm for 
the slightest alleged crime, without a 
fair trial to prove their guilt or inno- 
cence. And if they go North in consid- 
erable number seeking to better their 
conditions, the white labor unions form 
bands of blood-thirsty assassins w^hich 
mob, maltreat and kill them. ''Will not 
the Judge of all the earth do right?" I 
tell you, 3'ea. He seems a long time 
coming to their rescue, but come he will 
by and by and abundantly avenge the op- 
pressed. It may seem hard to believe, 
but it is nevertheless true that, with all 
the persecution heaped upon the negroes, 
instead of drawing them into a closer 
union with God through the Christian 
church, they are getting further and 
further away from God and are band- 
ing themselves together more and more 
in their idolatrous oath bound secret so- 
cieties. 

Since my last letter I held an Institute 
in St. Mark's Fourth Baptist church. 
Rev. J. Acox, pastor. New Orleans, 
Louisiana, from 3 to 4:30 and 8 to 10 
p. m. on June i8th, 19th, and 20th. Not 
fifty persons were present at any service 
save one, and the offering for the entire 
time was $2.50. The printing for the 
meeting was $1.50. I am still, you see, 
meeting with strong opposition from the 
secret society members. I am now con- 
ducting a fifteen day revival at the First 
Baptist church in Pass Christian, Mis- 
sissippi. 

I am very grateful to the Annual 
Meeting of the National Christian As- 



sociation, for their . sympathy expressed 
toward me in their resolution. I am not 
in very good health, but I am at my post 
of duty. The prayers of sympathetic 
friends will be encouraging. 



Blaine, Wash., March 19, 1917. 

Our little Baptist church in the north- 
east corner of our United Republic is 
standing firm in the doctrine. 

We were going ahead peacefully and 
souls wxre being saved when we unsus- 
pectingly took a man who was a Mason 
and on the higher critic order, into our 
peaceful abode. Suddenly all was con- 
fusion. Our pastor, however, went to 
him and said to him : "Either you will 
have to leave or I will go." They dis- 
cussed the matter quietly and in g"ood 
humor for a time, but finally the "higher 
critic" got angry and said some hard 
things. Our pastor, however, has won 
out, and we are going along again as 
peacefully as before. 

We expect a number of baptisms on 
Easter day. I have told you this little 
incident that you may know that the 
Lord has faithful ones away up in the 
northwest corner, and that it may en- 
courage you to go on in the work. 
Yours for Christ and Truth, 

Mrs. Martha Nicoll. 



Grant, Mich. 
Enclosed find $2 for two years' sub- 
scription for the Cynosure. Yes, in- 
deed, my sympathy is with your w^ork, 
and I am glad to co-operate with you. 
How could it be otherwise for a Minister 
of the Gospel, than to help such a noble 
work as the N. C. A. is doing? 

(Rev.) H. Oostendorf. 



Renovo, Pa. 

I enclose a check for $1, for which 

please renew my subscription for the 

Cynosure. I greatly enjoy reading it, 

and most heartily approve its principles. 

(Rev.) L. M. C. Weicksel. 



Zion's Watchman in a "full salva- 
tion," "separate from the world," un- 
denominational, non-sectarian rehgious 
weekly paper. Write for free sample 
copy. Address L. H. Higley, Publisher, 
Butler, Ind. 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



125 



STANDARD WORKS 



ON 



Secret Soqeties 



FOR SALE BV the 



National Christian Association, 



HOW TO ORDER: 

PRICES quoted in this catalogue include car- 
riage prepaid, by mail. Orders by insured mail, 
5c extra. 

TERMS — Cash with order. We do not wish 
to open accounts with individuals. When prices 
are not known, send sufficient and any balance 
will be returned to you. 

C. O. D. orders will not be filled unless $1.00 
accompanies the order. No books shipped on 
approval. 

REMIT by Bank Draft on Chicago or New 
York, or by Post Office or Express Money Or- 
ders. Personal checks should have oc extra added 
for collection. 

WRITE your name and address plainly and in 
full, giving street number, post office box, R. 
F. D. number and box, and when ordering by 
express, give your express office if it is differ- 
ent from your post office address. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASS'N. 

850 W. aiADISON STREET, CHICxiGO, ILL. 



STANDARD BOOKS 



ON FREEMASONRY 



riNNEY ON MASONRY, 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian, This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper. 
60 cents. 

FREEMASONRY: An Interpretation. 

By Martin L. Wagner, pastor of St. Johns 
English Evangelical Lutheran Church Dayton, 
Ohio, with an introduction by the Rev. G. H. 
Gerberding, D. D., professor of Practical Theol- 
ogy in the Theological Seminary of the Evan- 
geUcal Lutheran Church at Chicago, Illinois. 
This is a new book, and is a candid discussion 
of the institution Freemasonry, and offers an 
Interpretation of its veiled expressions, art, 
speech, religion and ethics, and of its symbols, 
ejnblems and ceremonies. This interpretation is 
based upon hints given and statements made 
by the highest Masonic authorities and tested 
In the light of sources from which these claim 
that Freemasonry is derived. Clotli, 560 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

MASONIC TEMPLES. 

A clear discussion of the religion of Masonry, 
by Pres. C. A. Blanchard. Contents: What is a 
Temple? Not Other Religions But the Christian 
Religion. The Lodge Bible Not the Christian 
Bible. The Masonic Religion Not the Christian 
Religion. Who or What is the Masonic God? 
The Roman Pantheon. Lodge Morals and Chris- 
tian Morals. 32 pages. 5 cents. $3.50 per hun- 
dred. 



FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of Unity Lodge, N«. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
Institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
lotoe from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
^he truthfulness of this work and show the 
eharactGi- of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich,, and others. This is the lat««t, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodffe Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, clotli, $1.00; pap«r cover, ao oeatA. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master ot' 
Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book 
gives the vyork and ritual of Blue Lodge 
Masonry, the proper position of each officer 
in the Lodge-room, order of opening and clos- 
ing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry." Illustrated 
with 85 engravings. Contains the "unwrit- 
ten" work. New Revised Edition, enlarged 
to 275 pages; flexible cloth $1.00, paper 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This booli gives the opening, closing, secret 
worlc and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and 
illustrations. It gives the correct method of 
conferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the 
oaths, obligations, signs, grips and passwords. 
All of which are correct and can be relied upon. 
The accuracy of t-his work has been attested by 
high and unimpeachable Masonic authority. 
Cloth, $1.25; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive^ by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. I'rofusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by I'resident J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furrhishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of th« character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford Incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 



126 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
decrees of Royal INIaster, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master. Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of IMalta. A book of 341 
pages in elotli, !?1.50; paper, $1.00. 

EXPLANATORY. 
"Handbook of Freemasonry" and "Chap- 
ter Degrees," and "Knight Templarism 
Illustrated" give the 13 degrees of the York 
Rite. There are 33 degrees in the ScotCr- 
Rito, but the first three degrees as given 
In the "Handbook of Freemasonry" belong 
to both the York and Scotch Rites. These 
five books give 43 different degrees without 
duplicating. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of thie Nobles 
of the Mystic Slirine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
Varged edition. 40 cents. 

EOCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
;hree Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
Bhipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated caji learn to read the cyphep. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

ADOPTIVE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

A full and complete illustrated ritual of the 
five degrees of Female Freemasonry, by Thomas 
Lowe, comprising tne uegrees of Jephthah's 
Daughter, Ruth, Esther, Martha, and Electa, and 
known as the Daughter's Degree, Widow's Degree, 
Wife's Degree. Sister's Degree and the Benevolent 
Degree. 50 cents. 

TREEMASONRY EXPOSED 

By Capt. William Morg-an. The genuine 
old Morgan Book; republished vi^ith engrav- 
ings, shovt^ing the lodge room, dress of can- 
didates, signs, due-guards, grips, etc. This 
revelation was so accurate that Freemasons 
murdered the author for writing it. 25 cents. 

MAH-HAH-BOIOI. 

Comprising "The Master's Carpet," which 
illustrates and explains the religious symbolism 
of the first three degrees of Freemasonry, and the 
"Hand-Book of Freemasonry," a complete and ac- 
curate exposure of the three degrees of Ancient 
Craft Masonry. By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master 
of Keystone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago, Illinois. A 
volume of 679 pages* Cloth, $1.50; 

THE MASTER'S CARPET. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
Btone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. Explains the true 
source and religious meaning of every symbol of 
the Blue Lodge, showing the basis on which the 
ritual is founded. By careful perusal of this 
work a thorough knowledge of the spiritual prin- 
ciples of Freemasonry can be obtained. Every 
Mason, every person contemplating becoming a 
member of the fraternity, and even those who 
are indifferent on the subject, should procure and 
carefully read this book. 406 pages, illustrated 
with 50 engravings. This book is out of print 
as a single volume. See "Mah-Hah-Bone" 
above. 

FREEMASONRY AT A GLANCE. 

Containing the illustrated .secrets of thirteen 
degrees of Freemasonry; Blue Lodge, Chapter, 
Council and Commandery degrees. Also the 
ceremonies, signs, grips, passwords, etc., de- 
scribed and Illustrated. 

Paper cover, 10 cents each. 



OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGE,EE£ 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

AMERICAN FREEMASONRY 

"A Study In American Freemasonry," based 

upon Pike's "Morals and Dogma of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite," "Mackey's Masonic 
Ritualist," "The Encyclopaedia of Freemason- 
ry" and other American masonic standard 
works. By Arthur Preuss, Editor of the Cath- 
olic Fortnightly Review. Among the chapters 
in this book are: "Is American Masonry a Re- 
ligion?" "The God of American Freemasonry," 
"American Freemasonry and the Kabbalistie 
Jehovah," "American Freemasonry and the Bi- 
ble," "Masonic Morality," etc. Cloth, 433 pages. 
Price $1.50 net. By mail $1.65. 

MASONIC OATHS NULL AND VOID. 

Or Freemasonry Self-Convicted. This is a 
book for the times. The design of the author 
(Edmond Ronayne) is to refute the arguments of 
those who claim that the oaths of Freemasonry 
rre binding upon those who have taken theoa. 207 
:5ages ; 40 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF FREE- 
MASONRY 

As proved in court in the New Berlin trial. 
Also the letter of Hou. Richard Rush, to the 
Anti-Masonic Committee of York Co., Pa., 
May 4th, 1831. The New Berlin Trials began 
in the attempt of Freemasons to prevent pub- 
lic initiations by seceding- Masons. These 
trials w^ere held at New Berlin, Chenango Co., 
N. Y., April 13 and 14, 1831. General Augus- 
tus C. Welsh, Sheriff of the County, and oth- 
er adhering Freemasons swore to the truth- 
ful revelation of the Oaths and Penalties. 
Slng^Ie Copy, 10 cents. 

HISTORY OF THE ABDUCTION AND MTJR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 

As prepared by seven committees of citizens, 
appointed to ascertain the fate of Morgan. 25 
cents. 

HON. TinJRLOW WEED ON THE MORGAN 

ABDUCTION. 

This is the legally attested statement of this 
eminent Christian journalist and statesman con- 
cerning the unlawful seizure and confinement of 
Captain Morgan in Canandaigua jail, his removal 
to Fort Niagara and subsequent drowning in Lake 
Ontario, the discovery of the body at Oak Orchard 
Creek and the two inquests thereon. Mr. Weed 
"esfifies from his own personal knowledge of these 
r.hrilling events. This pamphlet also contains an 
mgraving of the monument and statue erected to 
the memory of the martyred Morgan at BatavSa, 
N. Y., and unveiled in September, 1882, for which 
occasion Mr. Weed's statement was originally pre- 
pared 5 cents. 
EX-PRESIDENT JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 

Letters on the Nature of Masonic Oaths, Obli- 
gations and Penalties. There are only a few of 
these books in print, and they are not in the best 
condition. They can be furnished, in paper, at 
50 cents a copy. 

VALANCE'S CONFESSION OF THE MUR- 
DER OF CAPT. WM. MORGAN 

This confession of Henry L. Valance, one 
of the three Freemasons who drowned Mor- 
gan in the Niagara River, was taken from 
the lips of the dying man by Dr. JoTin C. 
Emery, of Racine County, Wisconsin, in 1848. 
The confession bears clear evidence of truth- 
fulness. Slugrle copy, 10 cents. 



August, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



127 



WAS WASHINGTON A iViASON? 

By President Charles A. Blanchard. This 
is the best contribution yet written on the 
question of Washington's relation to Free- 
masonry, 10 cents. 

WASHINGTON, LINCOLN AND THEIR CO. 
PATRIOTS OPPOSED TO SECRET SO- 
CIETIES. 

This booklet contains fifteen portraits of 
Statesmen and their testimonies vindicating them 
from any charge of adherence to secret societies. 
10 cents. 

WASHINGTON. 

What kind of a Freemason was he? 4 pages; 
postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents; a package of 75 
copies for 25 cents. 

STORIES OF THE GODS. 

By I. R. B, Arnold. Brief slcetches from the 
mythology of Rome, Greece. Egypt, India, Persia, 
Phrygia, Scandinavia, Africa and America, showing 
the relation and unity of the past and present 
systems. Tlie idolatrous worship of the Masonic 
lodge is thus clearly seen and understood. 10 
cents. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

MODERN SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
Wheaton College, President National Christian As- 
sociation, Ex-Fresident Sabbath Association of 
Illinois, etc. 

A brief treatise for busy people and especially 
intended for ministers and teachers. 

Part first answers objections and clears away 
the obstacles to a candid consideration of the 
fundamental questions involved. Part second 
treats of Freemasonry as the Icey to the whole 
subject. Part third relates to subsidiary organ- 
izations, — industrial, insurance, temperance and 
other lodges. Part fourth considers important 
Questions growing out of this discussion. 320 
pages; paper, 50 cents; cloth, 75 cents; half -leather, 
$1.00; full leather, $1.25. 

FOLLY, EXPENSE AND DANGER OF SE- 
CRET SOCIETIES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, President of Whea- 
ton College. They may be rudely classified as 
religious ; e. g., the Jesuits, Freemasonry, Oddfel- 
lowship, the Knights of Pythias, etc. ; political, ap 
the Know-Nothings, Knights of the Golden Circle 
the Order of American Deputies, the Ku Klu)i.' 
Klan, the White League, etc. ; industrial, as tM 
unions of carpenters, briclilayers, conductors, en 
gineers, etc.; insurance, as the Royal Arcanum, tli 
Modern Woodmen, the Order of the Iron Hall, tli 
Order of United American Mechanics, etc. ; an'O 
social, as the college fraternities. 5 cents. 

SECRET SOCIETIES ILLUSTRATED. 

Comprising" the so-called "secrets" (tlie 
sig-ns, gi'ips, pass-words, emblems, etc.) of 
Freemasonry (Blue Lodge and to the thirteenth 
degree of the American Rite, and the Scottish 
Rite), Adoptive Masonry (the Eastern Star), 
Oddfellowship (Lodge, Encampment, and Re- 
bekah degrees), the Good Templars, Temple of 
Honor, United Sons of Industry, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Grange. Over 250 cuts; 99 
pages; paper cover, 35 cents. 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP I L L U S- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, En- 
campment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By a 
Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, and 
guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a sketch 
of the origin, history and character of the order, 
over one hundred foot-note quotations from stand- 
ard authorities, showing the character and teach- 
ings of the order, and an analysis of each degree 
by President J. Blanchard. This ritual corre- 
sponds exactly with the "Charge Books" furnished 
by the Sovereign Grand Lodge. Cloth, $1.50; 
paper cover, $1.00. 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
I. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
tuting Rebekah Lodges, and Installation of Officers 
of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 



REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIT- 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 



MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
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128 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1917 



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WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

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m^m 




Vol. L. 



CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER, 1917 



Number 5 






Cbe American flag 



OPDen Tmaom from ber mountain belisM 

Unfurled bcr standard to the air. 
She tore the azure robe of ni9l)t, 

JInd set tbe stars of glory tbere; 
$be mingled witb Its gorgeous dyes 
tbe miiby baldric of tbe skies, 
Hnd striped its pure celestial wbite 
Ulitb streaUings of tbe morning ligbt$ 
tben from bis mansion in tbe sun 
$be called ber eagle bearer down, 
Bnd gave into bis migbty band 
tbe symbol of ber cbosen band. 



Tlag of tbe free beart's bope and bome, 

By angel bands to valor gipen; 
tby stars bape lit tbe welkin dome, 

JInd all tby bues were born in beapen. 
Tor eper float tbat standard sbeet! 

mbere breatbes tbe foe but falls before us? 
Ulitb freedom's soil beneatb our feet, 

JInd freedom's banner streaming o'er us! 

— Jobn Hodman Drake. 




OFFICIAU ORGAN* NATIONAL CHRIJTIAN ASfOCiMlOH 
10 CENTJ" A COPY EJTABU JHED I86S UOO A YEAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

Published Monthly by the National Christian 
Association. 



JAMES EDWIN PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor. 

850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



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BUS! NESS LETTERS should be addressed to 
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dress. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 
at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 
March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



The American Flag, poem, by John Rod- . 
man Drake Cover 

Lo ! I Am With You, poem, by. Margaret 
E. Sangster 129 

United Spanish War Veterans 129 

Bohemian-American Foresters I3l 

Knights of Columbus Join Masons — The 
Fortnightly Review 131 

Royal Highlanders 131 

Masonry "Shirking Its Part" — The Ameri- 
can Freemason , 132 

Noted Labor Foe Dead — Gen. Harrison 
Gray Otis 132 

Appealing to Vanity 132 

Christians in Lodges, by President C. A. 

Blanchard 133 

The North American Union Merger 136 

The Sigma Chi — A Fraternal Autocracy, 

by Rev. J. M. Foster, D. D .137 

Mormon Edition of the Bible 138 

The War and International Masonry, by 

L. Hacault LL. D., Magistrate 139 

Liquor Traffic Suppressed in Indian Coun- 
try — By Cato Sells, Commissioner 141 

'Trove All Things," by Rev. J. B. Gallo- 
way 141 

Freemasonry a Christian Institution? by 

Rev. C. B. Gohdes — Lutheran Youth 142 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 146 

The Cynosure to Soldiers 147 

Book Notice : Sacrifices, Their Origin and 

Significance 147 

Labor Union Happenings 148 



Editorial : 
The O. C. Y 152 

Expensive Legislation 153 

Mrs. Mary , Elizabeth Woodruff 153 

Masonic Political Aspirations 153 

News of Our Work; 
An Open Letter to Rev. Edward R. 
Burkhalter, D. D 154 

Secretary Phillips' Letter 155 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard 155 

From Evangelist J. L. Davis 156 

An Unclean Person, by "True Re- 
porter" ...157 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" ^158 

Mrs. Randle's Letter. 159 

Report of Southern Agent, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson '.160 

The Book for Soldiers, by Woodrow 
Wilson 160 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President Rev. D. S. Warner ; vice- 
president, Rev. John F. Heemstra; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thomas C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kit- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Lea- 
man, George Slager and Wm. M. Trap. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 3118 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St., 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck, Grafton, Calif. 

Eld. G. B. Crockett, Deraiott Ark. 



Vol. L, No. 5, 



CHICAGO 



September, 1917 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have I 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 



LO! I AM WITH YOU. 

Beside the plow He walks with me, 

And if my step be slow, 
He pauses, waiting so that he 

May lead me where I go. 
I feel his presence at my side, 

His hand upon my hair; 
His love sweeps boundless, like the tide, 

About me everywhere. 

Beside the plow He walks with me : 

I cut the furrows deep ; 
I know his gentle eyes will see 

The harvest that I reap. 
His guiding touch is on my arm. 

And well I know the care. 
That keeps me safe from sin and harm 

Is with me everywhere. 

Beside the plow He walks with me. 

And all my troubles sweep 
Away, I know that there will be 

No time to pine or weep. 
My very oxen seem to feel 

The rapture in the air, 
The love that lives to bless and heal 

Surrounds us everywhere. 

Beside the plow He walks with me. 

And lo, the sun shines down ; 
The same that shone on Galilee, 

And on a thorny crown. 
God grant that when the shadows creep 

Across the mountain fair, 
His love may still be wide and deep 

About me everywhere. 

— Margaret E. Sangster. 



To obey what you honor is wholesome, 
elevating ; to obey what you do not and 
cannot honor is debasing and, in the end, 
morally destructive. — David Wasson. 



UNITED SPANISH WAR VETERANS. 
Membership. 

"All honorably discharged Officers, 
Soldiers, Sailors, and Acting Assistant 
Surgeons of the Regular or Volunteer 
Army, or of the Navy or Marine Corps 
of the United States, who honorably 
served during the War with Spain, or 
during the Insurrection in the Philip- 
pines or with the China Relief Expedi- 
tion at any time between April 21, 1898, 
and July 4, 1902, and all officers or en- 
listed men in the United States Revenue 
Cutter Service or any vessel assigned to 
duty under the control of the United 
States Army or Navy Department dur- 
ing such war or insurrection or expe- 
dition, are eligible to membership." 

The principles of the order are said to 
be. Fraternity, Patriotism,' and Hu- 
manity. 

Its Objects. 

"First. To unite in fraternal bonds, 
through national, state, and local or- 
ganizations, those men who served in 
the military or naval establishments of 
the United States of America in the 
War with Spain and in the campaigns 
incidental to and growing out of that 
war. 

"Second. To honor the memory an' I 
preserve from neglect and oblivion the 
graves of the dead. 

"Third. To assist former comrades 
and shipmates, their widows, orphans 
and dependent relatives, such as need 
help, encouragement and protection. 

"Fourth. To perpetuate the memories 
of the \\'ar with Spain and -the cam- 
paigns in the Philippine Islands and in 
China, and to collect and preserve the 
records of service of the individual mem- 
bers of the organization. 



130 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



"Fifth. To promote the best interests 
of those who participated in the War 
with Spain and the campaigns in the 
PhiUppine Islands and in China. 

"Sixth. To inculcate the principles of 
imi\'ersal liberty, equal rights and jus- 
tice to all mankind, of loyalty to our 
country, reverence for its institutions, 
obedience to its laws, and respect for its 
magistrates, and to discountenance what- 
ever tends to weaken these sentiments 
among our people." 

The Initiatory Ceremony. 

The United Spanish War Veterans is 
a secret fraternal order having pass- 
words, grips, initiatory ceremonies, an 
altar, a Chaplain, religious rites, etc. Its 
meetings are opened with prayer ,by the 
Chaplain, who prays to the "Almighty 
Father" and addresses him as the "Su- 
preme Commander." The initiatory cer- 
emony is of the nature of a patriotic lec- 
ture and the oath which is taken "in 
the presence of Almighty God and these 
comrades" renews the candidate's vows 
of allegiance to the United States, binds 
him to hold the secrets of the -society as 
"sacred," and to aid worthy comrades 
when such aid does not work injury upon 
himself. The obligation closes with 
these words : "This obligation I volun- 
tarily assume and promise to fulfill on 
my honor as a man." The candidate is 
then required to sign his name in the 
"Descriptive Book" under this pledge : 
"I promise on honor that I will abide 
by the Constitution, and Rules and Reg- 
ulations of the United Spanish War Vet- 
erans and by-laws of this Camp and all 
other authority by which the camp may 
be governed." 

In the meetings of the order free 
speech is allowed, except such as violates 
the rules and regulations or common 
courtesy. The grips, passwords, etc., are 
protected by cipher code. 

The Burial Service. 

At the grave the Chaplain prays as 
follows : "Oh, God, our Heavenly Fa- 
ther, unto whom we may come in every 
hour of ' darkness and sorrow, to pour 
out our griefs to thee, and to rest onr 
troubled hearts under the shelter of thy 
compassion, hear now our prayer, we 
beseech thee, for those who are bowed 
down in mourning and affliction. In 
mercy do thou uplift and strengthen the 



bereaved wife and children (family) of 
this our departed comrade and with 
thine infinite tenderness console and 
comfort them and all here present. 
Grant that we, as comrades, may be 
blest, even now, by the true communion 
of spirit with the unseen world and en- 
able us to live in such faith and charity 
that we shall be thy true children, faith- 
ful to each other as comrades, and one 
company of friends on earth and in 
heaven. Amen." 

The Junior Vice-Commander lays a 
white rose or other flower upon the cas- 
ket and says, "This symbol of purity v\^e 
offer as an evidence of our belief in the 
immortality of the soul and of our hope 
of a better life beyond the grave." 

After the Senior Vice-Commander has 
laid a small national flag on the casket 
the Chaplain says, "In this sad hour of 
parting, we are reminded of the frailty 
and uncertainty of human life. The va- 
cant place our comrade so lately filled 
gives us further warning that our ranks 
are thinning and that we must be ready 
to answer the eternal call of the Great 
Commander. Let us, therefore, be so 
loval to every virtue, so true to every 
friendship, so faithful in our service to 
God and country that we may not shrink 
when the summons comes for us to join 
the ranks of that great army which has 
crossed to the other shore." 

After the comrades have come to "pa- 
rade rest" the Chaplain continues : "For- 
asmuch as it hath pleased Almighty God 
to take out of this w^orld the soul of our 
comrade departed, we, therefore, com- 
mit his body to the ground, earth to 
earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust, look- 
ing for the resurrection of the dead, and 
the life of the world to come. Amen." 

Or, the Chaplain may use the follow- 
ing committal service: "Forasmuch as 
it hath pleased Almighty God to take out 
of this world the soul of our comrade 
departed, we, therefore, commit his body 
to the groimd, earth to earth, ashes to 
ashes, dust to dust, looking for the res- 
urrection of the dead, and the life of the 
world to come, through our Lord lesus 
Christ." Then, after a pause. "I heard 
a voice from heaven saving unto me: 
Write— Blessed are the dead which die 
in the Lord from henceforth : Yea, saith 
the spirit, that they may rest from their 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



131 



labors ; and their works do follow 
them." 

The benediction is then pronounced by 
the Chaplain as follows: "The Lord, 
bless and keep us. The Lord have mercy 
upon us and be gracious unto us. The 
Lord lift up his countenance upon us 
and give us peace both now and ever- 
more. Amen."' 

The present membership of the L^nited 
Spanish ^^'ar \'eterans is approximately 
60,000. There are said to be something 
like 300,000 who are eHgible to member- 
ship. 

For the patriots who served their 
country during the Spanish-American 
War to form a social organization is a 
commendable thing, but no one has yet 
advanced a legitimate reason why there 
should be grips, pass words, oaths and 
secret meetings. These features, un- 
doubtedly, keep a large number from 
joining, just as they prevented many 
Civil War veterans from joining the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 

The teaching of this order as exem- 
plified in its burial services — which holds 
out the hope of a blessed immortality to 
its deceased members by virtue of their 
membership in the United Sanish War 
A'eterans — is a direct attack upon the 
teaching of the Scriptures: that only 
through repentance and forsaking of sin 
and through the acceptance of Jesus 
Christ as Saviour and Lord can such a 
state be secured. 



EGHEMIAN-AMERICAN FORESTERS. 



Officers of High Court Arrested for Liquor 
Sales. 

A picnic was given under the aus- 
pices of the High Court of Bohemian- 
American Foresters on Sunday. Juh 
22nd. Late in the afternoon policemen 
visited the picnic park and found i.ooo 
persons present and two bartenders busy 
selling beer. Four men, officers of the 
order, were arrested, charged with sell- 
ing liquor without a license and violat- 
ing the Sunday closing law. Four steins 
of beer were seized for analysis. 

Tbe Poor Abused Lodge Officers. 

When the case was called on July 
27th, in Judge Gemmill's court, the 
Judge grew wrath v and threatened the 
police with fines for contempt of court. 



because they had arrested the poor, in- 
nocent lodge officers. 

"All there is to these charges is this'' : 
said Judge Gemmill. "Somebody con- 
nected with the order holding the picnic 
ordered soft drinks from a brewery. 
The police claim beer was being served. 
I understand beer was given away, but 
not sold. The officers of the lodge had 
nothing to do with it and they should 
not have been arrested." 

Lodge Officers Granted Immunity. 

"I told the police they ought to be 
taken before the trial board or fined for 
contempt of court for arresting the lodge 
officers. The owner of the license of 
the park was the man to arrest if there 
was a violation of the law." 



K. OF C. JOIN MASONS. 
At a recent K. of C. celebration in 
Xew Orleans, according to the Times- 
Picayune of ]\Iarch 6th, the Rev. P. 
Wynhoven, vice-chancellor of the dio- 
cese and manager of the Morning Star, 
declared that the Knights of Columbus 
in Xew Orleans had lost almost one- 
third of their membership and had to 
reduce their initiation fee considerably 
to gain new members. At the same time 
the Freemasons were growing at an 
alarming rate from the Catholic young 
men of the city, and even from the ranks 
of the K. of C. "He said the knights 
could lay no more claim in works to be- 
ing the handmaid of the Catholic 
Church than could the Pickwick Club,'' 
etc. A similar condition of affairs ob- 
tains in many other cities besides Xew 
r)r]eans, and is the subject of frequent 
comment in Catholic circles, though it is 
seldom brought to the attention of the 
K. of C. themselves from the pulpit. 
Father Wynhoven deserves credit for 
his courageous frankness. — The Fort- 
nightly Rez'iez^', April i, 19 16. 



ROYAL HIGHLANDERS. 

The Royal Highlanders is one of the 
many fraternal insurance orders and is 
like the Modern Woodmen of America. 
F. J. Sharp, Aurora, X'ebraska. is Chief 
Secretary. 

The -Royal Highlanders commenced 
business in 1896. The cost of joining is 
$5 and the medical examination is free. 
There have been in the past twelve as- 



132 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



sessments each year, the total amount 
of insurance, so-called, on January 
1st. 19 1 7, was $40,374,100. Tlie total 
benefit membership was 28,897, ^^^ i^~ 
crease of 56 over last year. There is a 
decrease of six lodges during the same 
period according to "Statistics Fraternal 
Societies." Both men and women are 
admitted to membership. 

MASONRY "SHIRKING ITS PART." 

I am not in agreement w^ith Brother 
Darrah, of the Illinois Freemason, when 
he says: "All lodge property is subject 
to taxation. The fact that some lodges 
escape the payment of taxes on their 
property is simply due to the fact of their 
having friends on the local boards of re- 
view, who protect them. Inasmuch as 
Freemasonry is an eleemosynary institu- 
tion, and relieves the state of a certain 
burden in the care of the indigent, all 
^Masonic property should be exempt from 
taxation." In the first place, Freema- 
sonry is not a charitable institution. Such 
relief as may be given to the indigent and 
dependent is incidental, and is not the 
primary purpose of the fraternity. Its 
homes are perhaps to be classed as char- 
ities, and thus properly exempt from tax- 
ation, but by no stretch of right reason- 
ing can the property of lodges be con- 
sidered as exempt. The time is coming 
when the exempt classes of property, 
mostly religious, will be called upon to 
bear their just share of the common bur- 
dens, and surely Masonry will not be 
among those to plead crookedly in at- 
tempt to shirk its part. — Editorial The 
American Freemason. 

The Masonic lodges which pay taxes 
are so few and far between as to be a 
negligible quantity. 

NOTED LABOR FOE DEAD. 

Los Angeles, Gal., July 30. — Gen. 
Harrison Gray Otis, owner of the Los 
Angeles Times, died at the home of his 
son-in-law, Harry Chandler, to-day. 

Gen. Otis, soldier, journalist and life- 
long opponent of union labor, was born 
near Marietta, O., February 10, 1837. 
He enlisted as a private in the Twelfth 
Ohio Infantry at the outbreak of the 
civil war and rapidly rose through vari- 
ous grades to that of lieutenant-colonel 
of volunteers, being highly honored 
when mustered out. 



In 1876 he became editor and gen- 
eral manager of the Los Angeles Times, 
where he remained until his death. At 
the outbreak of the Spanish war Otis 
was appointed brigadier-general of vol- 
unteers and was sent to the Philippines. 
He led his brigade in the capture of 
Galoocan, for which gallantry he was 
promoted to a major generalship. 

Quite early in his career as editor 
and publisher of the Times, for he 
speedily obtained full control, he came 
into conflict with organized labor, and 
thereafter until the day of his death he 
waged an unrelenting warfare for what 
he termed industrial freedom. On 
October 10, 1910, his building contain- 
ing the printing plant was dynamited 
and twenty of his workmen were killed. 

John J. McNamara, secretary-treas- 
urer of the International Association of 
Structural Steel and Iron Workers, and 
his brother, James, were arrested in 
Detroit and Indianapolis and later 
pleaded guilty. John was sentenced to 
fifteen years in prison and James to life 
imprisonment. 

Gen. Otis was prominent in the Grand 
Army of the Republic and numerous 
other patriotic orders and a member of 
the American Academv of Sciences. 



APPEALING TO VANITY. 

A writer in a trade paper tells the fol- 
lowing story : 

"Some of these modern corporations 
have taken advantag^e of the fundamen- 
tal appeal to the vanity of authority and 
title, and they have capitalized the de- 
sire of young boys to be addressed and 
treated as young men and not just as, 
'Here boy!' 

"Not long ago the writer advertised 
for an office boy. After examining sev- 
eral tons of applicants, a bright appear- 
ing:, neat youngster was singled out and, 
with a sigh of relief, asked where he 
had worked before. 

"He named a paint works known from 
coast to coast. 

" 'What was your position?' 

" 'I was first assistant manager of the 
linseed oil department.' 

" 'What was your salary ?' 

" 'Four dollars a week.' 

"It developed that, at that particular 
paint works, all the office boys, and even 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



133 



the boys out in the plant, were given 
titles; that the titles acted like red uni- 
forms and brass buttons on a negro : 
that the boys would not take similar po- 
sitions in other plants even at an in- 
crease in salary, where they would be 
just plain, old-fashioned, garden variety 
office boys and not assistant general man- 
ager of the linseed oil department, vice- 
president of the factory cleaning depart- 
ment or knight of the golden prune." 

This writer could not refrain from 
taking a rap at the cocky, bedecked 



lodge man on public exhibition. He 

says : 

''Every^body takes pride in authority. 
Most of us don't care what kind of au- 
thority it is — just watch the hard-work- 
ing business man who gets out in pa- 
rade with his lodge, watch him strut 
along in gorgeous uniform, shaking one 
of these combination hearse plume and 
gold-headed canes — it's called a baton, 
but, from its looks, ozlamagoozala would 
be a better name." 



Christians 

Bv Pres C. A. Blanchard, 

This title has been suggested to me 
by a clipping from the Philadelphia 
Ledger. It occurred in a quotation from 
one of "Billy'' Sunday's sermons. He 




PRESIDENT C. A. BLANCHARD 

was making an argument for clean liv- 
ing and told the congregation, according 
to this report, that if they drank, swore, 
and were libertines they would not have 
any chance to get on. "The merchant 
won't have you," he said, "the lawyer 
won't have you, the lodge won't have 



in Lodges 

^heaton College. Illinois 

you." Then he went on to give the 
percentage of Masons, Odd-Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias and Woodmen who 
were professing Christians. "Why, even 
the saloon won't have you," he said. 
"The saloon-keeper does not want a fel- 
low behind his bar who will drink up his 
liquor and drive away his customers w^th 
insults, oaths and obscenities." 

It is, of course, true that godliness is 
profitable for this life as well as the life 
which is to come. The Word of God 
declares this and the experience of men 
proves it to be true. 

I do not know what his authority is 
for the percentages of professed Chris- 
tians in the various lodges. The Ledger 
says that his statements on this particu- 
lar point were received with cheers, 
which is an indication tliat there were 
lodge men present who were glad to hear 
it stated that many of their members 
were professing Christians. I do not 
know how the percentages were deter- 
mined, but I doubt very much whether 
it would be possible to make a count that 
would justify the statement. The fact 
that it was made and that it was received 
with applause is an indication of the 
state of things which did not at one time 
exist. In regard to the whole subject, 
there are a few things which I think 
should be said : 

Many Will Say Unto Me in That Day. 

Our Lord, referring to the times in 
which we are living and their end, which 
seems near at hand, said that large num- 
bers of professing Christians, even min- 
isters, were hypocritical and lost. "Many 
will say imto me in that day, Lord, Lord, 
have we not prophesied in thy name? 



134 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



and in thy name have cast out devils? 
and in thy name done many wonderful 
works? and then will I profess unto 
them, I never knew you ; depart from 
me ye that work iniquity." 

I have never known a lodge which had 
in its membership a large number of 
tjiese professing Christians. I have 
known lodges which were almost exclu- 
sively composed of men who had no re- 
lations whatever with the Christian 
church. If it were true, however, that 
from forty to sixty per cent, of the mem- 
bers of lodges were professed Chris- 
tians, that would not show that the 
lodges were anything but the Christ- 
rejecting associations that we know them 
to be. In the old days when confessing 
Christ meant the loss of property, the 
loss of social position, and frequently the 
loss of liberty and the loss of life, it 
meant much more then than it does to- 
day. Even in those days, however, there 
were hypocrites, and this naturally leads 
to the conclusion that unbelievers are 
likely to be much more numerous in the 
churches now. I therefore dismiss this 
part of my subject with the remark that 
I doubt very much whether the state- 
ment can be authenticated but that, if 
it is true, it does not determine either 
the character of the professed Christians 
who belong to the lodges or the character 
of the lodges to which they belong. The 
only method of determining the charac- 
ter of an organization is by a study of 
its authorities and an examination of its 
work. Both of these sources show that 
the lodges of our time are pagan re- 
ligions, that thev tend to paganize all 
who are connected with them, and that 
they everywhere rival, and, go far as 
possible, destroy the Christian churches. 
These statements may seem harsh to 
those who are uninformed, but they are 
abundantly justified by the facts in the 
case, and these are accessible to any- 
one who will take the time and trouble 
to inform himself. 

Rugs, Carpets and Pictures. 

The effort to show that a large per- 
centage of lodge men are also members 
of churches is one item in a consider- 
able list of efforts being made to make 
the secret orders more attractive than 
they have been to reputable men and 
women. Fifty years ago the lodges were 



comparatively poor ; their halls were 
very often shabby and their equipment 
was inferior. Among worldly men, per- 
sonal refinement was not so common as 
it is now. The regular degrees were con- 
ferred in a rough, rowdy, boisterous, 
often indecent, manner, and the side de- 
grees, which they used for spicing their 
meetings, were unspeakably loathsome. 
One cannot describe in public print nor 
in public addresses the indecencies to 
which men were subjected in taking 
these degrees. Two things resulted — ^first, 
the decent men left the lodges, having 
no interest in the obscenities which were 
common ; second, information concern- 
ing these immoralities becoming some- 
what dift'used, decent men did not come 
into the orders. The result was that; 
from the standpoint of even worldly in- 
terest, the lodges were losing. 

A number of reformations were there- 
fore attempted. In the first place, liquor 
drinking, which had been practically uni- 
versal, was banished from the lodge 
halls. It was generally near at hand, so 
that those who wished it could obtain it, 
but it was no longer permitted in the 
lodge rooms themselves. It was only 
this week that a lodge man in Philadel- 
phia said to me, with evident satisfac- 
tion and pride, that they had driven out 
the drinking and the smoking from the 
three or four lodges of which he is a 
member. He was in a Bible class at the 
time he made this statement and evident- 
ly was quite proud of the advances which 
his lodge was making in the direction of 
decency. Having driven out the drink, 
the smoke and the conversation which 
corresponded, it was natural that the 
lodge furniture and fittings should also 
be improved. The increasing wealth of 
members assisted in this movement, and, 
in place of the old, small, shabby lodge 
halls, the meeting places of these asso- 
ciations were frequently most elegant 
and costly. I have myself been invited 
to visit lodges and temples, the persons 
who asked me to go apparently feeling 
that I would be very favorably impressed 
when I saw the elegrancies by which they 
were surroimded. This, of course, tended 
to draw in men whose tastes were some- 
what cultivated and who were repelled 
by the old style of lodge halls. 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



135 



Neither Naked nor Clothed, Shod nor 
Barefoot. 

The initiation ceremonies kept pace 
with these material improvements. The- 
lodge clothes in which candidates were 
dressed w^ere made of cotton flannel, 
were large and roomy, so that men 
dressed in these pa jama-like outfits 
looked quite respectable. One can see 
at once how this would commend itselt 
to gentlemen. The membership of many 
of the lodges improved in tone so that 
the indecencies formerly associated with 
"finding the key to the ^Master's Word," 
etc., were dropped out. Men did not 
have to be Christians in order to resent 
such obscene trifling, all they required, 
was to be just gentlemen and fairly posi- 
tive in their characteristics. The re- 
sult of all these changes has been that 
the outside of the cup and the platter 
have been comparatively clean. A man 
who has little or no Christian faith may 
in these days unite with almost any of 
these lodges without the shock to his 
moral nature that he formerly would 
have experienced. A physician of large 
and successful practice once told me that 
in the Massachusetts lodge of which he 
was a member the members ahvays went 
in evening dress. This was unusual. I 
do not know that it is growing in popu- 
larity, but it is certainly true that lodges 
are much more comfortable places for 
well-bred men of the world than they 
used to be. A man who is a babe in 
Christ may be deceived by this attractive 
exterior. The quiet and attractive meth- 
od in which the lodge work is now done 
naturally draws men who do not look 
below the surface of things, and in our 
great cities, where men are frequently 
separated from their families and desire 
companionship, it is not at all singular 
that the lodges gain in membership. 

The Leopard Cannot Change His Spots. 

Wliile this is true and while the out- 
side of the lodges has improved in ap- 
pearance the essential characteristics of 
the organizations are unchanged. There 
are two forces operating to build up 
lodges. One is human and the other is 
demoniac. Men want the lodges because 
they wish companionship, friends, 
money, position, etc. Demons want the 
lodges because they desire worship. This 
is what Satan asked of our Lord. He 



proposed to give him the world if he 
would fall down and worship him, and 
Satan desires worship as much now as 
he (lid then. He is willing to pay the 
same price for it. He offers to give 
men the kingdoms of the world and their 
glory if they will worship him. ]\Ien 
are accepting this offer and by tens of 
thousands are falling down at the feet 
of Satan in the hope of getting some- 
thing or other which they want. Satan, 
on his part, is willing that the outside 
of the cup and the platter shall be clean 
if he can have what he wants on the in- 
side, and this is the basis on which the 
lodge movement is proceeding in our 
day. Have beautiful music, hire male 
quartets to sing, let them sing good" 
hymns, let the Chaplains, Priests and 
Prelates make good talks, relegate the 
drink, the tobacco, and the vile talk to 
ante-rooms or lounging rooms, but let 
the men keep on \living according to 
their own lusts. Do not ask them to re- 
pent of their sins or to confess their sins 
or the Saviour. Do anything you please 
so that Satan gets his worship, so that 
men believe that they can be saved by 
Hving up to something in place of being 
redeemed by the precious blood of Jesus. 
It seems strange that Satan can fool a 
man as he does. Some in one way and 
some in another, but with the awful re- 
sults of paganism ever before the eyes 
of men he goes on making his bids and- 
men go on rushing into his traps. 
What Is the Remedy? 
The only cure for the evils of this 
world is Christianity. Wherever it has 
had a chance it has done the work and 
nothing else has ever done it anywhere. 
This is the reason why the National 
Christian Association has a positive as 
well as a negative message. Luther used 
to say that it would do no good to de- 
throne the Pope unless Christ was en- 
throned. "Every man," he said, "has a 
Pope in his heart." In like manner we 
affirm that it would do no good to wipe 
out all the heathen religions of the world 
unless men accept the true faith of Jesus 
Christ. There are gods many and jords 
many: and if men do not come to Jesus 
they will have some pagan deitv set U[) 
in their hearts. We therefore insist on 
the one hand that all this secret society 
brood should be abandoned bv worthv 



136 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



men, and on the other that those who 
forsake Baal should worship Christ, 
^lany are disheartened at the outlook. 
This is not strange, for we live in a 
dark day and the darkness will deepen 
until the dawn. Four world empires and 
then the Kingdom of God on earth. All 
the signs of our time point to the near 
approach of Christ's coming, and as we 
see and hear the horrible things which 
are continually in our eyes and ears we 
are led to pray as the Revelator did, 
"Come, Lord Jesus, come quickly." 



THE NORTH AMERICAN UNION 
MERGER. 

It must be nearly as profitable to run 
a fraternal order as to sell a salted mine, 
if the acts of the officers of the North 
American Union are typical. Anyway, 
merging seems to be a popular diversion 
in the fraternal field nowadays. 

The Chicago Tribune of July nth, 
19 1 7, says: 

"Harold E. Spensley, former supreme 
president of the order, and Louis Cleve- 
land, chairman of the board of trustees, 
under cross-examination by Attorney 
John H. S. Lee, counsel for the policy 
holders of the North American Union, 
admitted at a session of court last night 
that they had received money from 
Frank Nunemaker, general manager of 
the order, after the contract had been 
signed for its merger with the Fraternal 
Aid Union. 

"Spensely admitted that he had re- 
ceived $3,000 from Nunemaker and had 
the promise of as much more. He 
stated that Nunemarker had promised 
the officers of the order four years' sal- 
ary with the new reinsuring order and 
had guaranteed them positions for that 
period. 

"Mr. Cleveland at first refused to tell 
the amount of money he had received 
from Nunemaker after the merger had 
been made, on the ground that it might 
incriminate him. It was only after 
Judge Foell threatened to take criminal 
action against him that Cleveland ad- 
mitted Nunemaker had given him $2,- 
300. 

Didn't Know What It Was For. 

"' 'Nunemaker owed me some money,' 
was the way Cleveland explained. Un- 
der questions he admitted that only 



$1,000 was a personal loan to Nune- 
maker. 

" T had no idea what the rest of the 
check was for, honest judge, I didn't,' 
said Cleveland. 

"Attorney Frank L. Shepard of 
Church, Shepard & Day, attorneys for 
the attorney general in this action, asked 
that an order be entered directing 
Spensley and Cleveland to pay to the 
receiver for the North American Union 
by 12 ' o'clock to-day the amount of 
money they had received from Nune- 
maker. 

" 'This money belongs to the order 
and the receiver is trying to collect in 
its assets and surely this money is part 
of the assets,' they argued. 

"Spensley stated he was willing to 
comply with any order of the court. 
Cleveland asked for leave to consult 
counsel. 

"Judge Foell ordered Spensley and 
Cleveland to appear in court at 12 
o'clock to-day prepared to 'comply in 
full with the orders of the court as to 
turning over the amounts they testified 
to having received from Nunemaker.' 

"Cleveland testified that the merger 
was the work of Nunemaker ; that no 
official vote was taken on the proposi- 
tion, and that he had not attended any 
meeting at which the question was dis- 
cussed. The merger was effected in 
December, 1916." 

In its issue of July 12th, 1917, the 
Chicago Tribune reports the following: 

"Further details of the merger be- 
tween the North American Union, and 
the Fraternal Aid Union, by which the 
supreme officers of the former company 
are said to have profited unduly, were 
unfolded yesterday before Judge Foell. 
The action is based on proceedings filed 
last April by the attorney general of 
Illinois asking that the contract of the 
merger be rescinded, a receiver be ap- 
pointed and the payment of a commis- 
sion of $228,000 to John Breytfogle, a 
broker of Kansas City, Kans., be en- 
joined. 

"Evidence was introduced' yesterday 
to show that Frank Nunemaker, busi- 
ness manager of the North American 
Union, had received a salary of $10,000 
a year, although the membership of the 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



137 



order was only 30,000 and the annual 
income, $35,000. 

Salary Paid Years in Advance. 

"Witnesses said they understood 
Nunemaker had paid himself four years' 
salary in advance. 

'■'He also forgot, the witnesses said, to 
iturn over to the Fraternal Aid Union, 
with the other assets of the North 
American Union, a mortgage for v$40,- 

000 it held on his property. 
"Godfrey Langhenry, Chicago attor- 
ney and supreme secretary of the North 
American at the time it was placed in 
the receiver's hands, admitted he had 
received $5,000 from Nunemaker after 
the merger had taken place. 

" 'All of the executive officers of the 
North American Union knew of this 
merger,' said Attorney Langhenry. 'I 
admit that I received the money, but 

1 was wilHng to turn it back if I was 
allowed attorney's fees.' 

''A payment of_$3,ooo for two years' 
advance salary was admitted on the 
stand by Louis H. Zimmerman, a furni- 
ture dealer at 4020 Madison street, and 
supreme vice president of the North 
American Union. The court directed 
him to return the amount." 



THE SIGMA. CHI— A FRATERNAL 
AUTOCRACY. 

BY REV. J. M. FOSTER, D. D., BOSTON, 
MASS. 

It may be of interest and profit to ])re- 
sent to the readers of the Cynosure a 
personal experience. In September, 
1868, I entered the Indiana state univer- 
sity as a sophomore.- Four Greek let- 
ter fraternities were there to accom- 
modate three hundred students. The 
Sigma Chi fraternity devoted its atten- 
tion to debating and orations. This ap- 
pealed to me. The Philomathean Lit- 
erary Society, of which T was a member 
from the first week, furnished a great 
opportunity for speaking, and ought to 
have been sufficient. But the students 
who were there p-ave their rivals a good 
race, pictured the advantages of the 
additional training in another evening 
each week, and so the open door was 
entered. I may say that the fellowship 
was above reproach and the drill there 
enjoved was of the highest advantage: 
and the more objectionable features of 



college fraternities that have since de- 
veloped were not in evidence. 

After leaving college and studying the 
question from the unbiased standpoint of 
one who sees it from afar I became pro- 
foundly convinced that the fraternity is 
a disadvantage rather than a help to the 
student body. It is secret, and that is 
out of harmony with the mission of the 
college. It is selfish, and that harms tht 
students who are in it. Its tendencies 
are in the wrong direction, as it prepares 
the students for joining later the more 
o1)jectionable orders, such as Freema- 
sonry, or Odd-Fellowship. 

The more thought I gave to the mat- 
ter, the deeper I regretted that I had ever 
entered the fraternity. At length I sent 
a letter to the secretary of the Lamda 
chapter at Bloomington, Indiana, ask- 
ing to have my name stricken from the 
roll. But no reply came. Then I sent 
a letter to the state headquarters in In- 
dianapolis. No attention was given this. 
Then I wrote the secretary of the Grand 
Chapter in Chicago, Illinois, but no heed 
was given at all. It seemed a fruitless 
quest. 

A banquet by the members of the Sig- 
ma Chi fraternities who have located 
here is held in Boston each year. Each 
time I received an invitation to attend, 
at $1.50 per plate, and each time I re- 
plied, declining the courtesy, by statin? 
my convictions and giving my reasons 
aeainst college fraternities. And I also 
asked if I could have their co-operation 
in my desire to sever my connection with 
the order. And that is all that ever 
came of it. "Nothing rame out of any- 
thing." 

Last December I received a communi- 
cation from Rov M. Harmon, Grand 
Historian and Editor, askine me to sub- 
scribe to the Manual and Directory. In 
replying I took occasion to state the 
above facts and asked him if he could 
help me to escape from the Siema Chi 
fraternity. The following is his reply : 
"Chica??:-o. Ian. 17. 1017. 

"I can only state, as I have done here- 
tofore, that the constitution absolutelv 
forbids the resignation of any member, 
a rule which mav seem absurd, but whicli 
i*^ a oiece of substantive law that neither 
the Grand Officers, the Executive Com- 
mittee or anyone else can disregard. 



138 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



"^^ly only suggestion is that you write 
a letter to the Executive Secretary of 
the Fraternity. Room 883, 208 South 
La Salle Street, this city, and formally 
prefer a request that your petition to be 
removed from the rolls be placed before 
the Grand Chapter, which convenes in 
St. Louis this coming June. At the same 
tim.e enclose a more or less formal peti- 
tion setting out your reasons. I am not 
sure that the Chapter will grant the re- 
quest, and am not entirely sure that, if it 
does, the action will be valid. But it 
is the only possible way out for you, un- 
less you want to do something which is 
so bad and inimical to the best interest 
of the Fraternity and which comes to 
the ears of the general office or your old 
chapter, when you might be expelled. 
"Sincerely, Roy M. Harmon." 

I immediately wrote to Byron O. 
Stokes, the Executive Secretary, asking 
if he would kindly lay my petition before 
the Grand Chapter, meeting in St. Louis, 
Missouri, in June, to have my name de- 
leted from their roll. He replied that 
he would do so and submit my paper 
stating my grounds for asking that my 
relations with the order be severed. The 
following reply states the outcome : 
"Chicago, July 9, 1917. 

'Tn regard to your request that your 
name be dropped from the roll of the 
Fraternity, will say that this matter wa^ 
considered by the Committee on Consti- 
tutional Revision at the Grand Chapter 
meeting and it was thought not practi- 
cable or desirable to make any change at 
this time. 

"As it shapes itself in my mind, the 
resignation of a member from any body 
is effected when that member by reason 
of personal action or desire wishes to 
sever his connection with the body con- 
cerned. I do not see how the Fraternity 
can coerce anyone to retain membership, 
inasmuch as membership is a matter of 
lovalty and is more or less a state of 
mind. I believe that if you do not any 
longer consider vourself one of us you 
reallv do not belong. 

"Sorrv that the action cannot be offi- 
cial. With all kind wishes, I am yours 
verv truly, Byron D. Stokes.'' 

The principle of a college fraternitv 
is : Once a member, always a member. It 
is strange that in a nation, fighting to 



make the world a safe place for democ- 
racy, such an autocracy has fastened it- 
self upon the institutions of learning fos- 
tered by the public funds of the states. 



MORMON EDITION OF THE BIBLE. 

Beware what edition of the Bible you 
buy. You may obtain IMorman litera- 
ture without knowing it. 

A new edition of the Bible has been 
issued in 19 17, containing a section in- 
serted between the Old and New Testa- 
ments consisting of 118 pages of Mor- 
mon teaching. There is no mark on the 
outside of this Bible to distinguish it 
from the ordinary King James version. 
The cover reads, "Holy Bible, Cyclope- 
dic Concordance, Ready Reference, Ox- 
ford S. S. Teacher's Edition." The only 
indication of the evil hand of the Mor- 
mon church is on the title page of the 
Mormon section which states that it is 
"Copyrighted, 1917, by Joseph F. Smith, 
Trustee in Trust for the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints." It is "de- 
signed for the use of missionaries and 
other students of the Scriptures." 

Recently the Mormon church opened a 
book store in Brooklyn which announces 
"Bible and School Books" for sale. This 
store is on Bedford Avenue close to a 
large public school and opposite the Bed- 
ford Branch Y. M. C. A. The Mormon 
church is making this its headquarters 
for the distribution of its literature 
throughout the East, including the sale 
of the edition of the Bible referred to. 

Consequently, it is natural that the 
first protest against this Bible should 
come from Brooklyn. The South Afri- 
can General Mission, the Presbytery of 
Brooklyn of the Presbyterian Church 
and other organizations, have adopted 
caustic resolutions aimed at the Oxford 
University Press for thus lending itself 
to the propagation of the Mormon doc- 
trine, and protesting at the evident at- 
tempt to palm off Mormon teachings un- 
der the guise of Christian literature. 

The vice president of the Oxford Uni- 
versity Press has declared that the pub- 
lication of the book has been discontin- 
ued upon receipt of these protests. He 
writes : "C)ur only excuse is that for 
many years the Bible has been made and 
boxed for them in this way and exactly 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



139 



in this shape, first by James Pott & Co., 
representing the Cambridge University 
Press of England, then two years ago 
by ourselves. This year the 'Ready Ref- 
erences' were revised and some errors 
and crudities eliminated. Rest assured 
that there is no wish to depart from 
evangehcal lines, to deceive people or to 
encourage the acceptance of Mormon 
doctrines. The book would have been 
discontinued long ago had there been the 
slightest protest." 



THE WAR AND INTERNATIONAL 
MASONRY. 
[The following is written for the Cy.xo- 
SURE by Dr. L. Hacault, a Belgian, now re- 
siding in Canada. He is the only Catholic, 
so far as our knowledge goes, who has taken 
an Associate membership in the National 
Christian Association, and he did this 
knowing that we oppose Catholic secret so- 
cieties equally with other secret orders. J 

Before the war, and dating from 1912, 
the Antimasonic League of France was 
publishing bimonthly, at Paris, a very 
important and up-to-date International 




This whole afifair is typical of Mormon 
underhanded working. No distinguish- 
ing mark on the outside of the Bible, 
keeping mum until found out, and then 
trying to make capital out of the discov- 
ery of a deception. • 

Again we say, be careful lest you buy 
a Mormon edition of the Bible unwit- 
tingly. 

(Rev.) Larimore C. Denise. 
Assistant Superintendent, National Re- 
form Association. 



Rcz'iciv of Secret Societies (Revue In- 
ternationale des Societes Secretes) of 
which I was an early contrilnitor, deal- 
ing with Masonic matters since 1870. 

On September 15, 1912, in the Inter- 
national Review, pp. 785-786, the 
French Colonel, du Paty de Clam (un- 
der the nojn de plume: "P. Esma") in 
an article entitled ''Austrian Chronicle," 
wrote: "The Austrian Emperor (Fran- 
cis-Joseph) is remaining faithful to the 
people and his future successor (Fran- 



140 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



cis-Ferdinand) seems to remain yet 
more faithful. This the Secret Societies 
could not allow without resisting. And 
so we can understand why, in 1908, 
when the Austrian Parliament was vot- 
ing credits by acclamation for the jubi- 
lee feasts in honor of the old Emperor, 
two deputies w^ere heard to exclaim : 
'\\'e will stop these feasts' and the Em- 
press Elizabeth fell under the knife of 
an assassin Luechemi in Geneva, where 
the death penalty had just been abol- 
ished. These feasts were stopped. . . . 
Perhaps w^e will also, some day, be able 
to explain the following, spoken recent- 
ly, September, 1912, by a High Mason 
in Switzerland, concerning the Arch- 
duke, the heir to the Austrian crown : 
'He is well. It is a pity that he is con- 
demned. He will die on the steps of 
the throne.' " 

I will add only this comment: Every 
year until the w^ar came, in the month 
of September — before or after the an- 
nual International "Convent'' of the 
Grand Orient of France, together with 
the "Supreme Council," of highest Ma- 
sonry at Paris — Switzerland was the 
place chosen for a secret meeting of the 
delegates of the 'Tnternational Federa- 
tion of the Latin Lodges," of Europe. 
(The principal centers of the Latin 
lodges are Rome, Paris, and the Bal- 
kans.) 

After the assassinatioii at Serajero, 
on June 28th, 1914, of both the Arch- 
duke and his wife — a startling fulfill- 
ment of his prophecy of 1912 — Colonel 
du Paty du Clam (who died afterwards 
in 1915, at Versailles, from wounds in- 
flicted on the battle field), wrote again 
under the same nom de plume an arti- 
cle entitled: "The Drama of Serajero," 
dated July loth, 1914, and published in 
the same Review (July 20th, pp. 11 -15). 
This article contained important revela- 
tions from which I am literally translat- 
lating the following paragraphs. After 
reviewing textually the prophecy of Sep- 
tember, 1912, he said : 

"This warning was personally com- 
municated to the Duchess of Hohen- 
berg, in September, 19 12." Then refer- 
ring to the assassination, as being the 
result "of a well-formed plot to suppress 
a specified person who had been sen- 
tenced to death by leaders of the sect in 



191 2," Colonel de Clam, dealing with an 
inquiry (1912-1914) made by the 
warned Archduke, concerning the plot, 
said (page thirteen): "He [the Arch- 
duke | also searched. Having searched, 
he found persistent hatred against his 
loving and well-informed wife, against 
the vigilant and patriotic soldier [him- 
self] ; he found it bearing, too fre- 
quently, the so-called French mark. . . . 
The future victim of Serajero under- 
stood that in France was concealed the 
focus from whence emanated the hatred 
against the heir to the Austrian crown, 
the train of which he was following in 
Switzerland like one follows a fuse lead- 
ing to a mine." 

I will only note here the absolute and 
eloquent silence carefully maintained 
from 19 12 until now by the interna- 
tional press, in both hemispheres on' 
these revelations, of the occult Masonic 
international origins of the now nearly 
universal European war and revolution. 
It is not only a conspiracy of silence by 
the press, but by all the political powers 
and by all their diplomats. Of course 
these facts are very well known through 
high international Masonry. But the 
Masonic spirit o^ "true light" has con- 
spired to keep silence upon these facts 
and it is well worthy indeed of the 
machiavelic secret powers of darkness. 
This gives an adequate idea of the occult 
power of secret societies upon what is 
called public opinion. I may add that a 
famous and illustrious statesman of 
Jewish ancestry, Benjamin Disraeli, 
Lord Beaconsfield, one of England's 
Ministers, knew something about Inter- 
national Masonry and its silence com- 
pelling power, when in 1876, he publicly 
declared in England that: "Since a cen- 
tury and a half, in most of the wars Ma- 
sonry has played considerable part. And 
it will yet he so in the wars now in prep- 
aration. Few know the true motives of 
the European wars." (Quoted by the 
International R.eviezv of Secret Socie- 
ties, Paris, March, 1914, page 900.) 
L. FIacault, LL.D., Magistrate, 
A Belgian Associate of the National 

Christian Association. 
Bruxelles, Man., Canada. 



God has two thrones ; one in highest 
heaven, the other in the lowliest heart. 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



141 



LIQUOR TRAFFIC SUPPRESSED IN 
INDIAN COUNTRY. 

For many years and in many localities 
there was a reign of debauchery when 
payments were made. To remedy this 
condition we sought and found a never 
before enforced Federal statute empow- 
ering the Commissioner of Indian Af- 
fairs to suspend payments when it ap- 
peared to him that liquor was within the 
ready reach of Indians receiving the 
payments. 

Perhaps the greatest abuse in this re- 
spect existed among the Osage Indians 
in Oklahoma. Nearly two years ago, 
when about to make a payment there, we 
notified the county and city officers, the 
head men of the tribe, and the business 
men of the community that not a dollar 
would be paid until we had satisfactory 
assurance of the strict enforcement of 
this statute. The immediate effect was 
pandemonium, but when it was discov- 
ered by all concerned that there would 
be no relenting or compromise every 
county and city officer, the head men of 
the tribe, and fifteen hundred citizens, 
including nearly every business man in 
Pawhuska, the county seat of Osage 
county, gave us their written promise 
and obligation to aggressively enforce 
the law if we would proceed with the 
payment. With this assurance, the pay- 
ment was made, and Osage county has 
been one of the driest localities in the 
United States, with exceedingly gratify- 
ing results not only to the Indians but 
to the business men and taxpayers of 
that vicinity. We have since carried out 
this procedure everywhere throughout 
the Indian country. — Excerpt from In- 
terview in Sioux City Journal with Cato 
Sells, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 



'TROVE ALL THINGS." 

BY REV. J. B. GALLOWAY. 

What is not commanded or clearly im- 
plied, is forbidden. This is the royal 
law in regard to morals and religion. "To 
the law and to the testimony, if they 
speak not according -to this word, it is 
because there is no light in them." (Is. 
8:20.) 'The Word is given that the 
man of God may be perfect, thoroughly 
furnished unto all good works." (i Tim. 

3:17.) 

Let us have faith in this crucial ques- 



tion of obedience to divine commands 
and "bring no vain oblations" (Isa. i : 
12-13) ; for *'in vain do they worship 
me, teaching for doctrines the command- 
ments of men" (Matt. 15:9). 

If these holy precepts of God's Word 
were duly observed by all individuals, 
and by the divinely authorized institu- 
tions of church and state, there would 
no longer be need for liberty leagues or 
liberty bonds to maintain peace on earth 
and good will to men. 

Moreover, every form of oath bound 
secret society or false religion would 
wither under the grill of the quick and 
powerful Word of God! "What is not 
commanded or clearly implied is forbid- 
den." 
"Who Hath Required This at Your Hand?" 

Who hath required you to bind your- 
self to obey a code of unknown laws and 
to keep the secrets of other men, when 
you cannot even guess what these secrets 
are? 

Is it wise — yea, is it not positively 
sinful to take an oath that includes a 
penalty that may jeopardize your own 
life or that of your fellow men? God 
speaks here and says, "Thou shalt not 
kill" and 'Thou shalt not take the name 
of the Lord thy God in vain." 
"It is a great sin to s\vear unto a sin : 
But greater sin to keep a sinful oath." 

This brings us face to face with what 
may be called the unpardonable sin of 
Masonry and other such societies, for 
example. They fly in the face of God 
and deny to their votaries the right of 
repentance. To repent, in Scripture, 
means to change the mind, to confess 
the wrong, and to make restitution where 
possible. In case of mistake or sin, God 
commands all men everywhere to repent. 
(Acts 17:30-) 

On the other hand, what does Masonry 
say : "Even though a ^lason may be 
suspended or expelled or withdrawn 
from the lodge ... he cannot cast off or 
nullify his Masonic covenant. No law 
of the land can aft'ect it — no anathema 
of the church can weaken it — it is ir- 
revocable." (Webbs' "Monitor," page 
240.) 

And yet it never occurs to the mass 
of Masons that there may be (many 
things that are not only antidemocratic, 



142 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



but antichristian. I was deeply impressed 
with this some time ago in conversation 
with a fellow comitryman. I said to 
him. Come over some Sabbath and visit 
our church ; see the brethren and hear 
the Psalms sung once more. ''Na, but ye 
wudna tak me in.'' Why not? "I'm a 
Mason." That needna hinder; can ye 
no' lea your ]\Iasonry? 'T canna, T'm 
a ]Mason.'' And he left the room great- 
ly agitated. No place for repentance or 
a change of mind here. He had learned 
his lesson well — "once a Mason always 
a Mason." Truly, Masonry or the god 
of Masonry is a hard master! "To 
w^hom ye yield yourselves servants to 
obey, his servants ye are to whom, ye 
obey." (Rom. 6:i6.) 

There are two gods who are seeking 
the obedience and homage of men — the 
God of heaven, who seeks to save, and 
the god of this world — the arch destroy- 
er who seeks to thwart the divine pur- 
pose by the dethronement of the Lord 
of glory, by false worship ; and this, it 
would seem, is still the method of de- 
mons for the corruption of true religion 
among the Gentiles. 

"But I say that the things which the 
Gentiles sacrifice they sacrifice to demons 
and not to God ; and I would not that ye 
should have fellowship with devils." (i 
Cor. 10:20-22.) "Ye cannot drink the 
cup of the Lord and the cup of demons." 
"Renounce hidden things." (2 Cor. 4:2.) 
"'Let the wicked forsake his way and 
turn unto the Lord and he will have 
mercy upon him ; and to our God for he 
will abundantly pardon." (Isa. 557.) If 
this goodness of God does not lead to a 
change 'of mind, what will? 

— Poynette, Wis. 



Every relation to mankind of hate or 
scorn or neglect is full of vexation and 
torment. There is nothing to do with 
mankind but to love them ; to contem- 
plate their virtues with admiration, 
their faults with pity and forbearance, 
and their injuries with forgiveness. 
Task all the ingenuity of your mind to 
devise some other thing, but you never 
can find it ; to hate your adversary will 
not help you ; to kill him will not help 
you ; nothing within the compass of the 
universe can help you, but to love him. 
— Orville Dewey. 



FREEMASONRY A CHRISTIAN INSTI- 
TUTION? 

BY REV. c. B. GOHDES, Editor, Lutheran 
Youth. 

That Freemasonry is a Christian insti- 
tution, was the point made by the Rev. 
W. T. Stockstill, a Methodist minister 
of Cincinnati, on the occasion of the cel- 
ebration of St. John's day (December 
26th), when this minister, himself a 
Freemason, addressed the lodge. That 
he spoke, not as a Gospel minister, but 
as a Mason, is evident from the fact that 
he referred to St. John as "our" patron 
saint. Any institution that requires a 
"patron saint," to our mind, is distinctly 
suspicious, because superstitious. But let 
the apostle of Masonic Christianity speak 
for himself. 

Tradition Offered for Proof. 

He puts Masonic "tradition" upon the 
witness stand to show that the relation- 
ship between John the apostle and the 
Masons originated in the times of the 
Crusades, when the Knights of St. John 
and the members of the ancient craft 
formed a union upon the basis of con- 
fessing the divinity of Jesus Christ. 

We have here a flagrant case of the 
utter impossibility of reconciling fact 
with Masonic tradition. Masonry as a 
secret society does not date back later 
than the eighteenth century, when it was 
constituted by freethinkers, who denied 
the divinity of Jesus Christ. However, 
if Masonry existed at the time of the 
Crusades as a distinctively Christian in- 
stitution, it is such no longer, provided 
the question is decided by official decla- 
ration of representative men and lodges, 
instead of by the vaporings of irrespon- 
sible pulpiteers like that Cincinnati min- 
ister. Mackey, known and approved by 
Masonic lodges the world over, says : 
"Under the shelter of this wise provi- 
sion, the Christian and the Jezv, the Mo- 
hammedan and the Brahmin, are permit- 
ted to unite at our common altar, and 
Masonry becomes, in practice as well as 
in theory, universal. The truth is that 
Masonry is undoubtedly a religious insti- 
tution — its religion being of that univer- 
sal kind in -which all men agree, and 
which, handed down a long succession 
of ages, from that ancient priesthood 
who first taught it, embraces the great 
tenets of the existence of God and the 
immortality of the soul — tenets which, 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1-13 



by its peculiar syml^olic language, it has 
preserved from its foundation, and still 
continues, in the same beautiful way, to 
teach." (Manual of the Lodge, pp. 95, 

96-) 

According to Mackey, the religion of 
Masonry teaches the existence of God 
and the soul's immortality. No Christ is 
there. That the most prominent Jews 
everywhere are Masons, everybody 
knows except the Rev. Mr. Stockstill. 
That the Mystic Shriners conduct their 
worship according to Mohammedan 
forms and phraseology, even Mr. Stock- 
still will not deny. 




That the Grand Lodges of Ohio, of 
Texas, and of Iowa, have expressed as 
their opinion that a belief in the divine 
authority of Scripture should be required 
of everyone who is admitted to the priv- 
ilege of Masonry, is true. While this 
explains the confusion existing in some 
minds regarding the true character of 
Masonry, the position of Masonry as 
such, as a society requiring no other 
faith than such a broad one as will admit 
the Jew and the Mohammedan, has been 
positively expressed. We read in Chase's 
Digest, p. 208: "The Grand Lodge of 
Ohio attempted to amend as they sup- 
posed the law, and at once the universal- 
ity of the institution is destroyed and 
none but the Christian becomes eligible 
to initiation. Your committee believe 
this all wrong. The Jews, the Chinese, 
the Turks, each reject either the New 



Testament or the Old, or both ; and yet 
we see no good reason why they should 
not be made Masons. In fact. Blue 
I>odge Masonr}^ [the first three degrees] 
has nothing whatever to do with the 
Bible. It is not founded on the Bible; 
if it were, it would not be Masonry." 

Let the reader ask himself with what 
clearness Christianity is confessed in the 
Masonic Lodge, if such opposite inter- 
pretations as Stockstill's and Chase's are 
possible. And when Stockstill the Chris- 
tian fraternizes with Chase the Deist — 
as he does and must — he is guilty of pre- 
cisely the same sin as the Israelites were 
when they endeavored to worship the 
true God Jehovah at the shrine of Baal. 

Talk of a sincere advocacy of faith in 
Christ when the following fatal admis- 
sion is made ! In Craft Masonry, page 
97, the following reference to Christ is 
found in the burial liturgy : 'T am the 
resurrection and the life," etc., John 11 : 
25, 26. Also Mark 13 :33-37. But below 
these quotations, used at the burial of 
Masons confessing Christianity, the note 
is found : '7/ the deceased zvas an Israel- 
ite, the selections from the Nezv Testa- 
ment may be omitted/' 

What real Masons think of men who 
seek to square the religion of ^Masonry 
with that of the Christian Church, the 
following quotation will show : "These 
men of sectarian bias a^^e the bad mate- 
rial, the soft, cross-grained, crumbling, 
shaking, cracked, unmanageable candi- 
dates with whom we have the most trou- 
ble." iMystic Star, 1867; p. 136. Call 
that critic brother ! \\^ill vou. Rev. Stock- 
still ? 

Not Founded on the Bible. 

"^^'e are reminded upon this occasion 
that Masonry is a Christian institution 
because its foundation stone is the Bi- 
ble," the Rev. ]\Ir. Stockstill continues. 
Let a real Mason, INIackey, explain the 
place and purpose of the Bible in Ma- 
sonry ; then let our readers ask them- 
selves if the mere placing of the Book 
upon the altar gives to the institution 
doing so a Christian character. "Land- 
mark twenty first : — It is a landmark 
that a 'Book of the Law' shall constitute 
an indispensable part of the furniture of 
every lodge. I say adzisedly, a Book of 
the Lazv, because it is not absolutely re- 
quired that ever yzi'h ere the Old and New 



144 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



Testament shall he used. The Book of 
the Law ig that vokimg which, hy tliv 
rellyion of the eoiihtry, is helieved to 
cOHtiiifi the rH'edled tvHl of the Grand 
rlnhitcct of the universe. H^riCis, ill all 
lo4^es in Ghfistian countries, the Bodk 
t»f tliie Law is c omp^s^xl of tlie Did 3.ncl 
N^W Testament ; in a country where Ju- 
daism was the prevailing faith, the Old 
Testament alone would be sufficient ; and 
in ^Mohammedan countries, and among 
Mohammedan ^lasons, the Koran might 
be substituted. . . . This landmark, 
therefore, requires that a Book of the 
Law, a religious code of some kind, pur- 
porting to be an exemplar of the revealed 
will of God, shall form an essential part 
of the furniture of every lodge.'' (Pp 

33l34.) . . 

Indeed^ we should wish for a bream 
of the holy passion ©f Luthe'f aiid his 
pow^r of sweeping invective to charac- 
tefixe an attempt to whitewash Masonry 
Upon the ground- that a Bible lies up^n 
its altars. Not oiily are Japanegfv Mo- 
hammedan, and Chinese lodges recog- 
nized. wKich, as a matter of fact, would 
\m pefniit a Bible upon their altars; but 
it is distinctly acknowledged that mereJv 
a Book of the Law, a reiigims vdde of 
-some kind, p'urhovtik'i^ to he an exemplar 
of the fy>z;mkn zvill of God, shall form 
kt\. ^S'Sxintial part of the furniture of 
fev^ry lodge. Just as Masonry makes no 
difference among its applicanls vvhether 
they are Christian? M Jews, other cir- 
turnstancts be^ng equal, so it distinctly 
i'tcOgniz^s any religious code, whether 
Christian, Mohammedan or Pagan, as 
<eqUally binding, provided it is believed 
to be in the particular country where the 
lodge is found an exemplar of the re- 
vealed will of God. If Stockstill is right, 
slam a Bible upon a bar, and the saloon 
becomes a Christian institution ! Ven- 
eration of the Bible is the vainest and 
vaguest of forms, unless it leads to re- 
generation through the Christ whom it 
proclaims. 

Masonic Virtues and Character. 

What was to be expected. Masonic vir- 
tues and character are to furnish the ul- 
timate proof that Masonry is a Chris- 
tian institution ! All we have to say is 
that, unless the average Mason is much 
better than his reputation, his character 
is as good as that of the average man 



of the woidd, and no better. While we 
have always shrunk from investigation, 
and cannot §peak frdm aetusll observa- 
tion, it r§ reported that iristii.ution'? d^-^ 
cidedl^ iin-Christian enjoy a §t@atly 
stiinulated patronage whenever MasQiii^ 
cbnvpntibn.^ take plaee: It also appears 
to us, who are of course a liiere "HoW^n/' 
that the distinctly and professedly Ma- 
sonic code of morals is as truncated as 
the distinctly and professedly Masonic 
faith in God and in the Scriptures. A 
Mason may personally be a Ijeliever in 
Christ, but he brothers the Jew who is 
a fellow Mason. He personally may bi= 
liev^ in thg Sl'flptiii-efe as the only saving 
revelation of Uod ; but masonically h^ 
must recognize as a Mason in good 
Standing the man Who believes in thel 
same way In the Morati. Likewise, whik 
under the influence of th^ Chiifchj th^ 
family, and a good moral environnieritj 
many Masdns are virtiiptis men, othefs 
m&,y b^ Masons in go6d standing With^ 
put being Virthous ; for in their oath they 
have hot obligated themselves further 
than not to violate a female relative of d 
fellow Mason, W^ our self ktiow of a 
prominent lawyer and Mason in a South- 
ern city deserting a virtuous wife and 
running away with a divorced worriartj 
whom he later married after securing a 
divorce from his poor helpless wife, by 
that time the voiceless victim of an apo- 
plectic stroke. When that lawyer re- 
turned to his city for a visit, his lodge 
gave him, rot a halter, but a banquet, 

A pastorate of twenty years has, more- 
over, convinced us that Masonry tends to 
lead to deception and hypocrisy. In the 
very application for membership, the 
candidate avows that he seeks no tern- 
poral advantage when seeking the privi- 
lege of membership. Conversation with 
such misguided persons has convinced us 
almost invariably that they signed their 
name to a falsehood ; for they became 
Masons, and many of them remain Ma- 
sons, because of "the social or business 
influence thus secured. 

The fact about Masonry, then, is, that, 
though it is a distinctly religious society, 
with oaths, prayers, funeral ceremonies, 
and a moral code based upon divine sanc- 
tions and retribution, Christ is not there. 
If he were, the Jew would go. The 
Knight Templar degree, where the Apos- 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. ' 



145 



ties' Creed is confessed, proves nothing 
to the contrary. That confession is a 
mere form, just as the presence of the 
Bible upon the Masonic altar. We, who 
in thg Christian church sincerely confess 
this creed, have come to the Savior 
thfoiigh the tear-anointed portal of re- 
generation; the Knight Templar, at his 
initiation, drinks wine from a skull and 
gets the grip, ignorance of which shuts 
out e^-ery one else from his Christian 
fellowship. And most Masons never even 
take this one "Christian degree/' 

An Ungodly Institution. 

Far from being a Christian institution, 
then, as the Rev. Mr. Stockstill so la- 
boriously endeavors to prove, Masonry 
is so nondescript, vacant, indefinite, un- 
christian, and, hence, ungodly an insti- 
tution that the Christian is allowed to in- 
terpret it in his way, the Jew in his, and 
the heathen in his way. But that is not 
Christianity. Christianity shows you 
Christ in a light So clear that you are 
driven to embrace or to reject Him. No 
Jfew, no believer in a mere Supreme 
Being, can feel at home in a truly Chris- 
tian church under the impression that his 
Conception of God is taught there. In 
pfayer and song and sermon, in sacra- 
ment and burial ceremony it is Christ, 
and again christ, and once more christ. 
And the Jew and other freethinkers, who 
crowd the altars of Masonry^ hear the 
voice and stay away, or, coming, they 
cease being what they are. 

Having Him, all else shall be added. 
That's the promise. Do you believe it? 
Then, when you are concerned over your 
progress in your calling, do not seek the 
way leading through the guarded lodge 
door; do not seek the backing of men 
and the pull of influential associates. 
Down upon your knees before Christ ! 
Let your prosperity and successes be his 
gift, and remember the great temptation 
he showed you how to meet when, to 
the Devil's offer, ''All this I will give 
thee, if . . . ," he replied, "It is 
written." 

For further light and impulse read 2 
Cor. 6:14-16. There you find the Holy 
Spirit's sentiments, who understands 
lodgery better than the false prophets 
who seek men's favor rather than God's. 
— Lutheran Youth. 



HE LOOKED HIM UP. 

A Kansas City man, who is very active 
in the affairs of his lodge, was spending 
the week-end at Excelsior Springs, a 
nearby mineral-water resort. He con- 
fided to a friend that he would like to 
scrape an acquaintance with a striking- 
looking woman they were both admiring. 

"Why don't you try?'' asked the 
friend. 

"Couldn't think of flirting with her," 
came the horrified reply. "Her husband 
and I are brother lodge-members.'' 

The next week-end the friend again 
went to the springs. On one of the 
prominent promenades he soon saw the 
lodge member and the striking-looking 
woman they had admired, walking arm- 
in-arm and apparently much taken up 
with each other. At the first chance he 
asked his friend for an explanation. 

"Thought her husband was a lodge 
brother of yours," he said. 

"Oh, that's all right," was the answer. 
'T looked him up on the books and he 
hadn't paid his dues !" — Everybody's 
Magazine. 



BOYS' DUTY IS TO GO TO SCHOOL. 

fFVom T/ie American Boy.) 
I advise all bovs to complete the high 
school course. This is the same advice 
which I would give in general, only many 
times emphasized as we face these pres- 
ent war conditions. The completion of 
their education is indeed a patriotic ob- 
ligation of our young boys. 

John Grier Hibbex, 

President, Princeton LTiiversity. 



SECOND HAND LODGE BOOKS. 

Grosh's Odd-Fellows' Manual, cloth, 405 
nacres (list price, new, $2.50). Sale price, 
$1.^50. 

Brotherhood of American Yeomen Ritual. 
Official ritual, 1903. 55 pages, cloth. Trice, 
50 cents. 

Carlile's Manual of Freemasonry. Fourth 
Edition. 1845. 356 pages, cloth. Price, 
$1.50. 

Mackey's Masonic Lexicon. 524 pages, 
cloth. Edition of 1869 (list price, $3.00). 
Sale price, %2.Z5. 

Pike's Morals and Dogma, published bj^ 
authority' of the Supreme Council of the 
33rd degree. Southern Turisdiction. Scottish 
Rite. (List price. $5.25.) Sale price, $4.50. 



If you would master temptation let 
•Christ master vou. 



146 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



3I0I1U (J^itinrg A&ams— S>txtl| fr^aiJif nt Ittttf b BtuUa 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of ]\Ir. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William ^Morgan by the Freemasons,_ and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

Ouincy. August 25, 1832. 
\\'illiam L. Stone, Esq. 

Dear Sir: ' ^ 

(Continued.) 
Xow what these secrets of the craft 
are to the keeping of which the candi- 
date, thus ignorant of their import, is 
sworn, is never defined. They are dif- 
ferently understood by different Ala- 
sons. The oaths, obligations, and penal- 
ties themselves have, until very recently, 
been understood, I believe, universally 
to form a part of these secrets. Those 
of the first three degrees were first re- 
vealed by the publication of Morgan's 
book ; those of the subsequent degrees, 
to that of the thrice illustrious order of 
the cross, were divulged by the conven- 
tion of the seceding Masons at Le Roy 
on the 4th of July, 1828. Those in Mor- 
gan's book, I understand, to be admitted 
on all hands to be correct. But with 
regard to the obligation of the Red 
Cross Knights and the Templars, as dis- 
closed by that convention, you say, that, 
although you have received those de- 
grees and assisted in conferring them, 
you know of no such obligations in any 
of the degrees. Your impression is 
that they must have been devised west- 
ward of Albany and imposed upon can- 
didates without the sanction of any gov- 
erning body. You do not question the 
correctness of the publication of these 
degrees by the convention of seceding 
Masons. You are authorized to state 
that when the forms of those obliga- 
tions were received in the city measures 
were taken by the grand encampment 
to ascertain whether any encampment 
under its jurisdiction had, in fact, ever 
administered any such obligations, and, 
if so. where and by whom they had 
been imposed. 

It is earnestly to be hoped that the 
grand encampment will sincerely and 
seriously pursue this inquiry, and make 



known the result of their researches to 
the world. In the meantime, observe 
the inferences to be drawn from this 
extrme diversity of the terms and im- 
port of the obligations as administered 
in different lodges, chapters, and en- 
campments ; but all under the sanction 
of this tremendous oath of the Entered 
pledge, given in advance, and in igno- 
rance of the Apprentice ; all secured by 
this soul-shackling what they are to be, 
and all riveted by the penalty to which 
I shall next advert. 

4. "All this I promise and swear, 
binding myself under no less penalty 
than that of having my throat cut across 
from ear to ear, my tongue torn out by 
its roots, and my body buried in the 
rough sand of the sea, at low-water 
mark, where the tide ebbs and flows 
twice in twenty-four hours." 

We have been told, over and over 
again, that this is understood by Masons 
to be merely an invocation ; and the com- 
mittee of investigation of the legisla- 
ture of Rhode Island have gravely told 
the world that the explanation given by 
Masons to this penalty is, "that I would 
rather have, or sooner have, my throat 
cut than to reveal," etc. It is vmfortu- 
nate that this explanation is in direct 
contradiction to the plain and unequivo- 
cal import of the words of the oath. 
The oath incurs the penalty for its vio- 
lation. The explanation promises fidel- 
ity, though at the expense of life. The 
oath imprecates the death of a traitor 
as a penalty for treachery. The expla- 
nation claims a crown of martyrdom 
for constancy. If Benedict Arnold had 
been taken in the act of treason to his 
country, he would have suffered no less 
a penalty than death — though not the 
barbarous and brutal death of the Ma- 
sonic obligation. When Joseph War- 
ren suffered death on Bunker Hill, is 
there an explanatory Mason who dare 
tell you that he suffered a penalty? Yet 
so it is that the Masonic oath, and its 
explanation, confound all moral distinc- 
tions to the degree of considering the 
death of a martyr and the death of a 
traitor as one and the same thing. 

This explanation of the penalty an- 
nexed to the Entered Apprentice's oath, 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



147 



it must be acknowledged, is not in- 
genuous — it is not even ingenious. It is 
a grand hailing sign of distress ; or it is 
a Masonic murder of the English lan- 
guage. 

I say this with the less hesitation, be- 
cause in your seventh letter, containing 
your defense of the Masonic obliga- 
tions, you have disdained to take this 
preposterous explanation of the Rhode 
Island Masons. You know too well the 
import of words. You candidly avow 
that the oaths and obligations are out of 
season — out of reason — and ought to be 
abolished. I will therefore forbear to 
press upon you the still grosser ab- 
surdity of the pretended Rhode Island 
explanation, when applied to the Mas- 
ter Mason's and Royal Arch penalties. 
The Master Mason's penalty is to have 
his body severed in two in the midst, 
and divided to the north and south, his 
bowels burnt to ashes in the center, and 
the ashes scattered before the four 
winds of heaven, ''that there might not 
be the least track or trace of remem- 
brance remain among men or Masons of 
so vile and perjured wretch as I should 
be." And this, according to the Rhode 
Island explanation, is to be the conse- 
quence of his dying like Hiram AbifT, 
rather than betray the Masonic secrets. 

My fifth objection is' to the horrible 
ideas of which the penalty is composed. 
It is an oath of which a common canni- 
bal should be ashamed. Even in the 
barbarous ages of antiquity, Homer 
tells you that when Achilles dragged the 
dead body of Hector round the walls of 
Troy, it was a dishonest deed — aeikea 
medeto erga; and Plato severely cen- 
sures Homer for even introducing this 
incident into his poem. A mangled 
body, after death, was a thought dis- 
gusting even to heathens. From the 
very thoughts, and still more from the 
lips of a Christian it should be forever 
excluded, like indelicacy from the mouth 
of a female. The constitution of the 
United States, and of Massachusetts, 
prohibit the infliction of cruel or un- 
usual punishments, even by the au- 
thority of law. But no butcher would 
mutilate the carcass of a bullock or 
swine, as the Masonic candidate swears 
consent to the mutilation of his own, 
for the l^reach of an absurd and sense- 



less secret. I can not assent to your de- 
nomination of these penalties as idle or 
unmeaning words. They are words of 
too much meaning — of hideous signifi- 
cancy. The Masons are bound for their 
own honor to expunge them from their 
records forever. Would that they. could 
be expunged from the language, dis- 
honored by their introduction into its 
forms of speech. 

I remain, very respectfully, your 
friend, John Quincy Adams. 



THE CYNOSURE TO THE SOLDIERS. 

When you are through reading this 
number of the Cynosure, send it to the 
camps of the United States Expedition- 
ary Forces in Europe. Just affix a one- 
cent stamp over the "Notice to Readers" 
on the front cover and the government 
will do the rest. Do not address or 
wrap the magazine. 

This is one practical way of doing 
missionary work. It has been repeated- 
ly pointed out that lodges become ex- 
tremely active in war times and the har- 
vest from them is always large. Now 
is your chance, at a trifling expense, to 
help offset the lodge activity. 

Only such magazines will be accepted 
under this plan by the post office as bear 
the "Notice to Reader" on the front 
cover. Beginning with the September 
number, we will carry this notice as long 
as the war lasts. 



BOOK NOTICES. 
Sacrifices, Their Origin and Significance. 
By B. A. M. Schapiro, Executive 
Secretary, Hebrew-Christian Publica- 
tion Society. This is one of a number 
of tracts "which the Jew reads and un- 
derstands," and is issued free to Chris- 
tion Workers among the Jews. Prof. 
R. D. Wilson, Ph. D., D. D., of Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary, says of this 
tract : "I believe it is one of the best 
treatises ever written on the subject." 
Address the Society, at 83 Bible House, 
New York, N. Y^ ' 



Zion's Watchman in a "full salva- 
tion," "separate from the world." un- 
denominational, non-sectarian religious 
weekly paper. Write for free sample 
copy. Address L. H. Higley, Publisher, 
Butler. Ind. 



M/^ 



148 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



Labor Union Happenings, 

Clipped from the Daily Press. 



Seven Labor Sluggers Laid Out. 

Chicago, July 19. — Seven labor sluggers 
were locked up last night, three of them badly 
battered, bent, and bandaged. About eighteen 
of them went into action in State street, be- 
tween Washington and jMadison. 

The heavy casualty list among the com- 
batants is ^ because — they didn't know that 
]\Iike Mulvihill was on the car. Mr. Mulvi- 
hill is a police sergeant of the Chicago avenue 
station and w'as going home. While women 
screamed and men fought to get away, Mike 
sailed in with his gun as a club. 

A riot call was turned in, but by the time 
Lieut. Shoemaker and a wagon load of re- 
serves reached the place sluggers were lying 
scattered all around and Mike was still work- 
ing industriously. 

The trouble was the result of several ma- 
chinists w^orking at 24 West Austin avenue re- 
fusing to go on strike. 

The assailants are supposed to have been 
members of the International Association of 
Machinists, just being organized here. When 
the strike was called only a part of the men 
went out. Last night the strikers met the 
street car in which the workers were riding 
home. 

Part of the strikers boarded the car and the 
rest followed in an automobile. 

Just after the car entered the loop the fight 
started. Mulvihill drew his pistol and stood 
the mob off momentarily. As they closed in 
on him he reversed his gun, and from then 
until the wagon arrived the rattle on heads 
sounded like a drum. 

The prisoners were locked up pending a 
search for those who escaped. 

Labor^^Boosts High Ccst of Living. 

Chicago, June 27. — There is a city-wide 
movement to force small milk dealers to raise 
the price of their product to the price adopted 
by the large concerns — 10 cents a quart. 

There are 800 small milk dealers in Chi- 
cago. The Chicago Milk Dealers' Association 
includes only about half — those who conduct 
good sized businesses. Association members 
have been, charging 10 cents a quart ; nonas- 
sociation members have been charging 9 cents. 

The Chicago Milk Drivers' Union has en- 
tered into the fight. In addition to their 
wages the drivers get a commission on indi- 
vidual customers they serve. This custom has 
been in effect since the union forced the large 
milk concerns to discharge solicitors. These 
drivers are now losing customers as a result 
of the lower price charged by nonassociation 
members. 

For three weeks meetings have been held in 
a hall over a saloon at Lincoln avenue and 
Roscoe street. Thirty of the smaller dealers 
attended yesterday. At the executive table 
were seated the following: 

Gus Koy of the milk firm of Gus Koy & 
Bro., president of the Milk Dealers' Associa- 
tion: Martin Coleman, secretary of the Milk 



Dealers' Association; Steve Sumner, business 
agent of the Milk Drivers' Union; Assistant 
Business Agent Miller of the same union, and 
Ernest Renter. 

Renter is a discharged employe of the 
health department. At the time he was sus- 
pended Dr. Robertson alleged that improper 
pasteurizing devices were approved by the 
food bureau and that an improper under- 
standing existed between certain inspectors 
and representatives of milk interests. 

"This is the last time we're going to tell 
you," shouted Sumner, shaking his fist at the 
dealers. "If you're disposed to do the right 
thing, I love you and I'll take care of you. 

If not, you , I hate you, and I'll 

make you do the right thing." 

Sumner than introduced one of the business 
agents of the janitors' union. 

"Mr. Sumner is the one who organized us," 
said the business agent. "If he says the word 
we see to it that undesirable milk dealers 
don't get into our flats. You either got to be 
O. K.'d by Steve or you don't get in." 

When the meeting was concluded Mr. Koy 
announced that the following day Business 
Agent Miller would distribute cards to all the 
dealers in the neighborhood. 

"And if there are any dealers who refuse 
to take the cards, or refuse to live up to the 
price agreement," added Koy, "Miller will re- 
port the names, and then " 

Commissioner of Health Robertson had 
taken the matter up with Chief of Detectives 
Mooney and two plain clothes men managed 
to get into the meeting. An investigation will 
be instituted. 

Janitors' Union in Eomb Plot. 

Chicago, July 11. — Labor trouble was defi- 
nitely charged today with responsibility for a 
bomb explosion which jarred the south side 
last night. Eight members of the janitors' 
union, including officials, are held at the 50th 
street police station in connection with an at- 
tempt to wreck a flat building at 221-27 East 
50th street. Sergt. M. J. Grady declared the 
explosion has been proved to be a union job 
and said his prisoners had given clews to the 
perpetrators. 

Labor Board Planned to Check Strikes. 

Chicago, Aug. 10. — The labor situation is 
getting more attention today from our war 
executives than is Germany. Things are not 
very bad yet, but nothing is so contagious as 
the strike fever, and the government is doing 
everything it knows how to do to insure 
against a strike epidemic that would delay the 
infinity of war business that is just beginning. 

To insure against any serious interference 
with our big war plans the Council of Na- 
tional Defense today announced the imminent 
creation of a labor adjustment commission, 
consisting of nine men— three representating 
labor, three the employers and three the gov- 
ernment. 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



149 



According to the plan as announced : 

"Every contractor and sub-contractors shall 
agree to accept and abide by the decision of 
the labor adjustment committee, and every 
worker accepting employment in any plant 
within the jurisdiction of the commission shall 
do so with the dehnite understanding and 
agreement that he will accept and abide by the 
decisions."' 

The decisions shall cease to be binding on 
employers and employes sixty days after the 
close of the war. Then if the men want to 
strike they may go to it and fight it out as 
such "things are always fought out, for the 
government will not then be directly con- 
cerned. 

The Department of Labor is to initiate all 
settlements of labor disputes, either of its own 
motion or at the request of employers or em- 
ployes. If the mediator selected by Secretary 
Wilson can't patch up the row, the adjust- 
ment commission steps in. 

With fair wages — and the government in- 
sists on the eight-hour day, the full union 
scale and adequate excess wages for overtime 
in all its work— and in the glow of patriotism 
consequent on active warfare, the strike men- 
ace is expected to fade. 

Rock Island Strike Settled. 

Chicago, July 19. — A strike which might 
have seriously affected the operation of the 
Rock Island Railroad system was averted yes- 
terday by a government appeal to labor lead- 
ers, and it was through the subsequent efforts 
of the government that the controversy was 
declared to have been practically settled last 
night. 

For some time 6,000 machinists and other 
workers in the Rock Island shops have de- 
manded a wage increase of 10 cents an hour 
and a working day of eight hours. 

A deadlock resulted, and apparently there 
was no way that an amicable settlement could 
be reached. 

Secretary of Labor Wilson, in Washington, 
learned of the matter. He immediately di- 
rected Tames A. Smyth and Frederick L. 
Feicks, members of the bureau of conciliation 
of the Department of Labor, to go to Chicago 
and take a hand. They arrived only a few 
moments before the hour for the start of the 
strike. 

Hurriedly the two government men com- 
municated with the union leaders. They told 
them what a disastrous effect such a strike 
might have and appealed to their patriotism 
to call a truce. 

The union men responded to the appeal. 
The result was that announcement was made 
by the union men that the matter had been 
settled and there would be no strike. 

The railroad granted the demand for an 
eight hour day and a wage increase of 8^/^ 
cents to machinists, 7 cents to helpers, and 7 
cents to car men. 
Labor Protests U. S. Strike Interference. 

Chicago, Aug. 10. — Launching a volley of 
accusations against the local bureau of the 
federal Department of Justice, Illinois organ- 
ized labor yesterday appealed to President 
Wilson and three other high authorities to 



halt immediately the alleged misuse of power 
Ijy Hinton G. Clabaugh and attaches of his 
bureau of investigation. 

Fifty local, national and international trade 
union chiefs met yesterday and sent a letter 
to President Wilson, Secretary of Lal)or Wil- 
son, Attorney General Gregory and Sam- 
uel Gompers, chairman of the National 
Council of Defense labor committee. 
The letter charged the local bureau of justice 
with strike-breaking, false arrests and other 
acts directed at organized workers throughout 
the state. 

Blaming Mr. Clabaugh's office for "admit- 
tedly illegal deportation of union laborers" 
and for "frightening the workingmen into de- 
claring the strike against the Chicago, Rock 
Island and Pacific off," the union- heads de- 
manded instantaneous interference by the fed- 
eral powers-that-be. 

Citing two cases, the union officers in the 
course of their letter allege that the bureau of 
justice arrested, imprisoned and held without 
bail several labor leaders and later confessed 
to the illegality of the arrests. 
U. S. Sitting on a Labor Strife Volcano. 

Washington, D. C, July 25.— Many of the 
miners now working in the coal mines of 
Pennsylvnia are aliens. Thousands' of them 
have not even taken out their first citizenship 
papers. Under the law these men are not 
subject to be drafted into the armies of the 
United States. 

At piece work they are able to earn $8 to 
$10 a day. Two days' pay is more than their 
average monthly earnings in Europe. Com- 
plaints come that many of them refuse to 
work more than two days a week. That cuts 
down the possible output of coal mines by 
two-thirds. In other words, 'only one-third of 
the capacity is being produced. 

Just at present a greatly increased supply 
of coal, both for military and domestic pur- 
poses, is one of the vital needs of the gov- 
ernment., 

_ Scores of telegrams and letters asking ques- 
tions and others relating to all sorts of labor 
difficulties and conditions come every day to 
the office of the committee on labor of the 
National Council of Defense. Samuel Gom- 
pers, president of the American Federation of 
Labor, is its chairman. He has been broad 
enough to appoint on his central committee 
and on his various subcommittees not only a 
number of leaders of organized labor but such 
men as Elisha Lee, general manager of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and C. E. 
Michael of the National Association of ]\Ianu- 
facturers. 

It is noticeable that there are no men repre- 
senting labor on the other committees of the 
national council of defense, except that on coal 
production, where the leaders of the unions 
practically forced the appointment of some of 
their numlier. 

^ieantime there is a growing feeling among 
organized labor men that they should have 
recognition on the other great subcommittees 
dealing with the purchase and manufacture of 
vast quantities of munitions, supplies, and 
goods of all kinds. 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



In the ranks of the council itself there is a 
considerable difference of opinion as to the 
wisdom of giving labor a wider representa- 
tion. It may come with the proposed reor- 
ganization of the council of defense by Presi- 
dent Wilson. If it does not it is already ap- 
parent that Air. Gompers, who has been work- 
ing for the success of the prosecution of war 
with patriotic devotion, will be put in an in- 
creasingly difficult position. 

One of the first acts of Mr. Gompers' com- 
mittee was to pass a resolution calling upon 
all employers and employes alike not ''to take 
advantage of the country's necessities _ to 
change existing standards." That resolution 
was approved by the whole council of de- 
fense and immediately stirred up controversy. 

With the rising cost of living it was pointed 
out that some advances in wages might rea- 
sonably be asked for. The council explained 
that it meant "no lowering of present stand- 
ards."' 

Meantime scores of threatened strikes have 
been prevented or quickly settled through the 
efforts of the labor committee. But labor 
leaders in various parts of the country are 
complaining that the great affairs of the coun- 
cil of national defense are managed almost 
entirely from the standpoint of the employer. 

Being human, many of them would like per- 
sonal recognition on the various important 
committees. Also they think they should be 
heard on matters affecting wages, hours of 
labor and other working conditions in the 
various trades. And strikes of a serious char- 
acter are increasing in number. How long 
and to what extent Mr. Gompers will be able 
to hold the ambitious heads of organized 
labor in line under the existing conditions is 
somewhat menacingly uncertain. 

Mr. Gompers and Frank Morrison, as offi- 
cers of the American Federation of Labor, 
have signed an agreement with the war de- 
partment, according to which there are to be 
no strikes or lockouts on any of the great 
armv cantonment jobs, union wages are to be 
paid' and all differences are to be submitted 
to the final decision of three men, an army 
officer, a representative of the public and a 
labor leader. So far the plan has worked 
exceedingly well. 

"Be Loyal," Gompers' Plea to Labor. 

New York, Aug. 19.— Samuel Gompers, pres- 
ident of the American Federation of Labor, 
today called on all labor organizations to join 
a nation wide fight against "suspicious bodies" 
in the labor movement. 

He asked organizations to form local alli- 
ances of the American Alliance for labor and 
democracy. This alliance came into being with 
Mr. Gompers' recent decision to Americanize 
thoroughly the labor movement to counteract 
internal agencies. 

Mr. Gompers, in his appeal, said : 

"One of the chief reasons for the need of 
this new organization was that in New York 
City, and spreading to other cities, were or- 
ganizations—so-called councils of one kind or 
another — having no connection with the bona 
fide labor movement yet pretending to speak 
for the labor movement. 



"They so completely misrepresented labor 
that drastic and immediate measures had to be 
taken. 

"The American labor movement must speak 
for itself. It must fight its own battles, and 
defend itself and this free country against 
those who try to wreck it, whether from with- 
in or from without." 

Strike Halts Shipbuilding Plans. 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 5. — Strikes in pri- 
vate shipyards, which threaten serious delay 
to the naval and merchant shipbuilding prog- 
ress, have been brought to the personal atten- 
tion of President Wilson, and action forcing 
the unions and employers to reach a settlement 
is under consideration. 

The most serious strikes are at the private 
yards in the New York district, many of 
which have government shipbuilding contracts. 
The navy department is being seriously em- 
barrassed by the unwillingness of the unions 
and employers to reach a compromise. 

Conciliators of the department of labor have 
been pleading with the yard owners and labor 
leaders, at the solicitation of the navy depart- 
ment and shipping board, without making 
progress toward a settlement. There are at 
present approximately 12,000 men out. 

The demands made by the strikers approxi- 
mate an increase of 50 cents a day. This 
represents about $30,000 a week in excess 
charges to the yards owners, while it means a 
disturbance to the government's military pol- 
icy which may result in expenditures many 
times this amount. 

Carpenters' Strike Perils All U. S. Work. 

New York, Aug. 9.— Union carpenters' offi- 
cials threatened today to tie up government 
work throughout the nation unless their de- 
mand for a "closed shop" is granted. They 
followed this threat by calling a strike of 3,000 
men on one cantonment tonight. 

The nation-wide strike, the carpenters' offi- 
cials said, would involve more than 300,000 
men. 

Carpenter work would be halted in thirty- 
two army cantonments being built for the 
training of the national guard and the new 
national army, they declared. 

By the strike also, they said, the construc- 
tion of two port terminals, with immense bar- 
racks for temporary accommodation of troops 
on the way to Europe, some marine canton- 
ments, several aviation camps, the New York 
navy yard and perhaps other navy yards would 
be tied up. 

The carpenters demand the immediate dis- 
charge of all non-union carpenters from fed- 
eral work or the cancellation by the govern- 
ment of contracts with all firms employing 
such labor. 

Samuel Gompers, president of the American 
Federation of Labor, was said tonight to have 
telegraphed the carpenters' chiefs that such a 
strike would be in violation of an agreement 
entered into by him with Secretary of War 
Baker last June. Under this agreement a 
committee of three, representing labor, the 
army and the public, was to be named by 
Secretary Baker to settle all disputes arising 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



151 



after that date in connection with war depart- 
ment work. 

Henry Steers, the contractor who is con- 
structing the Pelham Bay Park cantonment, 
is the only contractor with whom the union is 
at war. It is charged that he has employed 
many non-union hands at the park. The con- 
tractors at Yaphank, Hempstead Plains and 
City Park are using only union labor, but 
they and their men are involved because all 
the contractors have the same employer — the 
American government. Under a union rule a 
contractor or employer who sanctions use of 
non-union hands on one of its jobs is liable to 
a strike on all his jobs. 

Three Shot in Ohio Car Strike Riot. 

Lima, Ohio, Aug. !'. — Rioting broke out in 
the street car strike here late today. 

Three men were shot in a clash between 
strike sympathizers and armed guards on the 
city cars of the Ohio Electric Railway Com- 
pany. 

Police dispersed a crowd of 5,000 persons 
gathered in the vicinity of the interurban de- 
pot. Mayor Simpson ordered all saloons 
closed at 5 :30 o'clock. 

Trouble started on the public scpiare when 
E. K. Stroup, striking car man, attempted to 
board a car manned by strike-breakers and 
two guards. Charles Crider, motorman of the 
car, is said to have shot Stroup, thinking he 
meant to attack the conductor. Stroup may 
die. 

A mob of more than 1,000 people pursued 
the car a block and a half east to the interur- 
ban station of the Ohio Electric Company. 
There two west-bound city cars were met and 
all were stalled by the crowd. The six men of 
the crews and six armed guards made a dash 
for the interurban building 100 feet away. The 
mob blocked the way and the men began 
shooting. 

Leonard Short, striker, fell with a bullet in 
his abdomen and Charles Morrison, another 
striker, was hit in the hip. Short is expected 
to die. 

Four riot calls and a fire alarm brought 
police and firemen to the scene. The mob at- 
tempted to burn one of the cars, but the de- 
partment extinguished the flames. All three 
cars were so badly damaged they could not be 
moved to the barns. 

Two Hurt in Illinois Car Strike. 

Soringfield, 111., July 27. — All cars of the 
Springfield Consolidated Railway Company 
were ordered to the barns at 10 o'clock tonight 
after a woman sitting on her porch was 
struck by a stray bullet and a deoutv sheriff 
had been shot by a sympathizer with the strike 
of street car men. 

Mrs. Lee Freeman was the woman shot. 
She was hit in the shoulder during a fusillade 
on a passing car. Seven bullets lodged in the 
body of the car, but none of the passengers 
was hurt. 

Deputy Sheriff Walter Can field, who, with 
other deputies of .Sheriff Wheeler's regular 
force, attempted to disperse a crowd in the 
southern part of the city, was shot in the 
stomach. Neither Mrs. Freeman nor Can- 
field was seriously wounded. It was at first 



reported that a street car operative had been 
shot. 

Reports of minor disturbances were received 
by the sheriff shortly after dark. One street 
car conductor was knocked off his car, but 
managed to escape from his attackers. 
Coal Price Smashing Campaign Menaced 
by Strike. 

Striking miners in the Illinois coal fields are 
pictured today as a menace in the coal price 
smashing campaign. This is the attitude as- 
sumed by the operators who are in session at 
the Great Northern hotel to decide whether 
to accept the action of their seven representa- 
tives who signed an agreement with Gov. Low- 
den to abide by a price to be fixed by a coal 
director for coal to Illinois consumers. Inci- 
dentally the state council of defense and other 
ofificials have refused to look upon the strike 
in a serious attitude. They have not permit- 
ted this phase to muddy the waters to their 
viewpoint. 

Gov. Lowden, in Springfield, was trying to- 
day to settle the strike. About 500 mine driv- 
ers and motormen in the Springfield field have 
tied up the activities of 15,000 or 20,000 men 
by refusing to live up to the union contract. 
President Frank Farrington of the United 
Mine Workers of America for the Illinois 
district has been blaming the attitude of the 
state council of defense for the strike. 
I. W. W. Leaders Jailed. 

Spokane, Wash., Aug. 19.— The United 
States government struck a smashing blow at 
the Industrial Workers of the World today. 

Within a few hours of the time set for the 
threatened I. W. W. strike among agricultural 
and construction workers in Washington, Ore- 
gon, Idaho and Montana, twenty-seven lead- 
ers of the "terrorists" were placed in jail here 
as military prisoners. 

The arrests today, it was said^ were the first 
move in the government's plan to stop the 
atternpt to tie up or destroy crops and vari- 
ous industries necessary for the prosecution 
of the war. 

The proposed strike, if carried out, would 
imperil a vast part of the nation's food sup- 
plies, tie up mines producing needed metals of 
war material and perhaps cripple the great 
airplane campaign, with which the United 
States is expected to wrest supremacy of the 
air from Germany, and ultimately win the war. 
Lumber workers in four states already are on 
strike. 

Reports tonight from all the states named 
in the strike order were to the effect that 
federal, state, county and city authorities were 
prepared for any eventuality tomorrow. 

James Rowan, district secretar}', was the 
most prominent of the I. W. \\'. leaders ar- 
rested here today. Rowan had already signed 
the orders calling on the farm workers to 
strike tomorrow and "let the fruit rot on the 
ground." 

San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 20. — Peace and 
quiet prevailed today throughout the north- 
west states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and 
Montana, where a strike of thousands of In- 
dustrial Workers of the World in the con- 
struction, harvesting and fruit industries was 



152 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



scheduled to take place under orders of the 
organization leaders. 

A survey of the situation early tonight 
showed that every line of industry to_ be af- 
fected by the proposed strike pursued its nor- 
mal, orderly \\ay, and, so far as could be 
ascertained.' onlv one attempt was made by 
anv I. W. \V. leader to carry into effect the 
strike order issued recently by James Rowan, 
district secretary of the organization, with 
headquarters at Spokane, who advised farm 
workers to '"let fruit rot on the ground," and 
calling on construction workers to lay down 
their tools. 

Union Labor Assists the I. W. W. 

Chicago, Aug. 6.— Resolutions terming the 
Ivnching of Frank Little at Butte, Mont., "a 
dastardly crime against labor"' were concurred 
in unanimously by delegates of the Chicago 
Federation of Labor 3^esterday. 

The document was submitted to the federa- 
tion bv the painters' district council, which 
adopted it originally. The delegates voted to 
give credentials to Paul Lindgard, a repre- 
sentative of the Metal Mine Workers' Union 
of Butte (affiliated with the I. W. W.), en- 
abling him to solicit funds from unions affi- 
liated with the Chicago federation for the 
benefit of the striking miners. A contributiou 
of $50 from the federation itself was made. 

In the resolution it was stated that, 'while 
the painters' district council does not agree 
with the policies and tactics of the I. W. W., 
still we demand that representatives of labor 
be guaranteed the right of free speech, with- 
out being molested by gunmen in the pay of 
the capitalists." 

CHfton, Ariz., Aug. 6.— A telegram to Presi- 
dent Wilson asking what action he intended 
taking with reference to the deportation on 
July 12 of 1,150 alleged members of the In- 
dustrial Workers of the World and their 
sympathizers from Bisbee, Ariz., was sent to- 
day bv the Arizona State Federation of Labor 
in "convention here. The telegram, which was 
approved by unanimous vote of the delegates, 
follows : 

"The sixth annual convention of the Ari- 
zona State Federation of Labor desires to 
know if you intend to act in restoring law 
and order in Cochise county, Arizona, and re- 
turn to their homes the deported men of Bis- 
bee. Are we to assume that the Phelps-Dodge 
interests are superior to _ the principles of 
democracy? An answer is awaited by this 
convention." 

Judge Protects Taxi Company From Unfair 
Union Competition. 

Chicago, Aug. 6. — Another resolution 
adopted by the Chicago Federation of Labor 
. was directed at Judge Joseph Sabath for his 
action in issuing an injunction prohibiting two 
taxicab companies from painting their ma- 
chines with the color used by the Yellow Cab 
Company, which is non-union. The _ in- 
junction, it was declared in the resolution, 
"is used as a bludgeon to batter down the 
efforts of union chauffeurs to obtain a living 
wage." Judge Sabath's action was declared 
"another partnership of the courts with the 
employers." 



EbttnmL 



THE O. C. Y. 

"Of making many books there is no 
end," and, with equal truth, this might 
also be said of church and Sunday school 
orders. 

The latest of these is the "Order of 
Christian Yokefellows," invented last 
February by Rev. W. T. Dorward, pas- 
tor of the Tabernacle Baptist church, of 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to "fill a pathetic 
gap" in his efforts to get men and "an- 
chor" them to the church. So he has 
roped and thrown quite a bunch with 
his "purely Christian" secret society 
lasso and is anxious to introduce the 
roundup into as many Protestant 
churches as will fall for the show. 

Rev. Mr. Dorward says his "is a secret 
order" that is "thoroughly Christian" — 
why ! there "ain't no sich animal." The 
active officers are. President, Counselor, 
Guide, Chaplain, Guard, and Secretary, 
with a Vice-President or two of the 
"honorary" class thrown in for good 
measure. 

Local lodges are called "Homes," a 
good name, we think, though perhaps 
Asylums would be more appropriate for 
the class of professed Christians who 
cannot be, induced to do church work 
without the lure of a secret society sugar- 
teat. Children of the male sex who are 
nineteen years of age and over are ad- 
mitted and it takes at least twenty of 
them to make a "Home." 

Because his church does not aid its 
distressed members as it should. Rev. 
Mr. Dorward has hitched a death benefit 
scheme to his lodge. Since a Yoke- 
fellow has to die in order to have any 
claim on his fellows, it would appear that 
if he is distressed by sickness he is aban- 
doned to the mercy of the church — or of 
outsiders. 

There does not appear to be anything 
which this secret church order attempts 
to do that is not being done in scores of 
churches to-day by "men's clubs" and 
rhurch insurance societies, without the 
lodge feature. The tendency of the 
O. C. Y. will be to break down the 
scruples of those who, for conscientious 
reasons, oppose secret orders, and it will 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



153 



also tend to serve as a feeder to the pack 
of more objectionable orders lurking by 
the door. 

It is a dangerous experiment to try to 
warm the secret order snake in the bosom 
of the church, and ultimately nothing 
but disaster can come from it. 



dencc will be produced to prove he was 
a brother Mason, just as they now claim 
such antimasons as Samuel Adams, ex- 
President John Ouincy Adams and other 
early patriots. 



EXPENSIVE LEGISLATION. 

An organ of the Odd-Fellow order, 
advocating biennial instead of annual 
sessions of the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
states that "The expenditure requisite 
for the per diem and traveling expense 
of the order's supreme legislative body 
ranges between $30,000 and $50,000 each 
session ; so that the resulting annual sav- 
ing, on this score alone, would probably 
be not less than $20,000 a year. By turn- 
ing the question around, we may well 
ask, Is the need of annual meetings of 
the Sovereign Grand Lodge so great 
that it can justify the addition of $20,- 
000 to the yearly expenditures? The 
deficit and a growing problem of finan- 
cial embarrassment, wdiich the Sovereign 
body now faces, would disappear at 
once.'' 



MRS. MARY ELIZABETH WOODRUFF. 

Mrs. IVIary Elizabeth Woodrufi:', widow 
of Lucian Woodruff, died July 26th at 
the home of her son, Lucius Woodruff*, 
45 Carroll street, Binghamton, New 
Y^ork. She lacked only 24 days of being 
100 years old. Besides the son, she is 
survived by nine grandchildren and 
twelve great-grandchildren. 

Mrs. Woodruff was a great Bible 
reader and religious student. She was 
posted on all current events and was in- 
terested in the preparations that were be- 
ing made for the celebration of her cen- 
tennial day. 



''The fine reasoning of President Wil- 
son is praised as being the truest his- 
torical showing of ideals that are in es- 
sence Masonic." — American Freemason, 
May, 19 1 7. 

Since they can not claim President 
Wilson as a Freemason, the Masons 
stretch themselves under his table, and, 
smacking their chops, declare the crumbs 
have a decided Masonic flavor. 

Probably, after Mr. Wilson has been 
dead a score of vears, all sorts of evi- 



MASONIC POLITICAL ASPIRATIONS. 

"When the time comes for the final 
adjustment of peace conditions follow- 
ing the world war. Masonry will be an 
important factor in bringing universal 
peace," was, according to a press dis- 
patch, the statement by Leslie F. Hub- 
bard, attorney general of Colorado, who 
is attending the meeting of the Supreme 
Council of the Thirty-third Degree, Scot- 
tish Rite, southern jurisdiction. 

"Masonry has a great mission in this 
war," Mr. Hubbard said. 'Tts influ- 
ence will be an important factor in 
bringing about universal peace. The 
noble sentiments emanating from the 
order will have a salutary effect on the 
nations striving to get back to a footing 
of brotherly love and democracy. ]\Ia- 
sonry is strong in Germany and Austria, 
as well, as in our own country and 
Great Britain. The order will be solid 
when peace comes and wdll therefore 
be able to do more good for humanity 
than it has ever done before." 

If the order is ''solid" when peace 
comes, something like a miracle will 
have to be performed. At the present 
time, to English and American Alason- 
ry, French Masonry is outlaw. Ger- 
man Masonry shares in the hatred which 
all Germans hold for the English, and 
has not only severed fraternal relations 
but has declared its complete indepen- 
dence of the British lodges. England 
has kicked out (for the time being at 
least) her alien enemy ''brethren," not 
only in the homeland, but also in her 
colonies. If war feeling shall run high 
in this country, American lodges will 
doubtless follow suit because their 
strong point is aping the English. 

It appears to us that this order of 
"noble sentiments" will have to spend 
some time mending their broken ram- 
parts before they will be able to present 
a "solid" front. By the time their crum- 
bled walls are rebuilt, it may be too late 
for them to meddle effectively in inter- 
national aft'airs. 



154 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



Mtm of (But Worfe. 

AN OPEN LETTER. 

Chicago, August 4, 191 7. 
Rev. Edward R. Burkhalter, D. D., 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Dear Sir : 

I have read with interest your article, 
"For the good of the order," in the 
March, 19 17, number of The Builder; 
that after serving as pastor of a Pres- 
byterian church for forty-five years you 
entered the Masonic lodge and found 
companionship there which, from your 
article, it is fair to infer, you did not 
receive in the church of Christ. Your 
mind was also absorbed by the sym- 
bolism and mysticism which you found 
"abundant and significant." 

Did you notice, sir, on page 84 of the 
same number of The Builder, this state- 
ment : "I need only add that the edu- 
cated Muslim finds Freemasonry in as- 
tonishing accord with the teachings of 
]\Iuhammed, and there , is absolutely no 
reason why a good Muslim should not 
be a good Blue Lodge Mason"? May I 
ask, What fellowship is there for a 
Christian minister in an institution whose 
religious teachings are '*in astonishing 
accord with the teachings of Muham- 
med"? Are you also able to say that the 
teachings of Jesus are in astonishing ac- 
cord with those of Muhammed? How is 
it, then, that you, a minister of Jesus 
Christ, in your declining years find such 
fellowship in an institution which is in 
astonishing accord with His enemies? 

Why is it that the word "Brother," 
spoken in that worldly institution. Free- 
masonry, meant so much more to you 
than ever had the brotherhood of those 
in Christ? Do you find the. brotherhood 
of the world more gratifying than that 
of the church in whose service you have 
spent so many years? 

And do you, as Chaplain, pray in the 
name of Jesus Christ, or do you use the 
prayers in the ritual which purposely 
omit all reference to the Lord Jesus? 

Did you also notice the following quo- 
tation on page 93 of the same number of 
The Builder, taken from some unnamed 
Masonic journal? 

" 'Every ancient landmark of Free- 
masonry, every sign and symbol known 



by us and between us as brethren, in- 
dicates that we cannot as a body rec- 
ognize Jesus, Buddha, Mahomet, or 
Moses, or any of the denominational 
churches of either. All prayers or 
speeches that recognize or appeal to 
any deity or prophet, save to God 
alone, are out of place in a Masonic 
lodge.' 

"This is followed by an editorial 
comment in the same paper as fol- 
lows : 'Sometimes a minister, in of- 
fering prayer in a Alasonic meeting, 
inadvertently uses the name of Jesus, 
but in all xases, in our opinion, it is 
the force of habit, and never done in- 
tentiontally.' " 

And then the Editor of The Builder 
comments on the above as follows.: 

"If he will think a little, he will sec 
that the declaration is absolutely 
sound, and that Masonry could not 
long exist upon any other basis. If 
it were to recognize Jesus as the only 
teacher and become distinctly Chris- 
tian, it would be excluding men of 
Hebrew or Hindu faith, and thus be- 
come a sect, dividing men instead of 
uniting them. * ''^ '^ And the same is 
true in the matter of prayer, to which 
the editorial refers. * '^ * Masons are 
ever seeking a lost, ineffable Name — 
what does it mean? It means that 
they are seeking God Himself — not 
a mere word, but that knowledge of 
the Eternal and fellowship with Him. 
which is the goal and crown of life. 
* * * He [the 'Christian' Mason] is 
not a true Christian — much less a 
sensible man — if he has not a sincere 
respect for the faiths of other men, 
and rejoices to join with them in the 
common prayer at our universal al- 
tar." 

God, in his Word, nowhere justifies, 
but unqualifiedly condemns the idea of 
a "universal altar." Jesus said: "I am 
the way, the truth, and the life ; no man 
Cometh unto the Father, but my me" 
(John 14:6). 

I have felt impelled to write you be- 
cause the account of your experiences 
made me long: to help you to see that the 
institution with which vou have lately be- 
come identified is dishonoring to Him in 
whose service you are ordained. Re- 
spectfully yours, Jas. E. Phillips. 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



155 



SECRETARY PHILLIPS' LETTER. 

Under the instruction of the Board of 
Directors, I have been looking after 
N. C. A. interests at a few points in 
Iowa and Nebraska. 

It was my good fortune as I stepped 
from the train at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 
to meet Mr. Oscar Kemp of that city. 
Together we visited the N. C. A. sup- 
porters and in a way introduced them 
to each other. Mr. Kemp was pleased 
to make the acquaintance of these 
friends, of whom he remarked : "Every 
one is stalwart in the faith." It is his 
hope now, as each one knows ''who's 
who," to so co-operate with them, that a 
more general and telling testimony shall 
be given in his city. I assured him that 
the National Christian Association 
would heartily co-operate with them, but 
that I hoped that he had enlisted for the 
war, and not in the expectation of an 
early peace, unless our Lord shall soon 
come. The financial help received from 
these friends was encouraging. 

I was courteously received at the Iowa 
Masonic Library by Grand Secretary 
Parvin, who manifests the same kindly 
consideration toward callers that was so 
characteristic of his father, whose suc- 
cessor in office he is. The Masons may 
be justly proud of their library. It con- 
tains some 15,000 different volumes at 
the present time on Masonry alone. In 
its museum are many interesting objects. 

I was in Omaha, Nebraska, at a time 
when the thermometer seemed uncertain 
whether it ought to go above 115 de- 
grees or not. Whatever the exact truth 
is the weather, the heat made'it difficult 
to accomplish much, and yet in calls 
upon clergymen, in the distribution of 
tracts, and in the securing of Cynosure 
subscriptions, something w^as accom- 
plished. Rev. Chas. W. Savidge, pastor 
of The Peoples church, gave me the 
privilege of testifying in his church. 
''Have faith in God" is his motto ; but 
not merely a motto, for his faith has 
been tried, and has not failed. It is not 
surprising that when he stepped out in- 
dependently and cut loose from lodge 
fellowship he more fully knew the joy 
of salvation and answered prayers. 

An Old Peoples Home in Omaha is 
one of the monuments to his Christian 
activity as well as an evidence of God's 



l)lessing upon his efforts. Another evi- 
dence that he has not lost out with the 
people because of having separated him- 
self to a peculiar reliance upon God 
rather than men is seen in the fact that 
he has been called upon to marry 3,650 
couples. May God bless him and open 
his eyes to a still clearer view of what 
^'Satan's materpiece" is doing to the 
souls of men. 

The greatest strength in the move- 
ment for Christ and his Kingdom versus 
the Lodge in Omaha is found in the 
German Lutheran churches of the Mis- 
souri Synod. And according to their 
faithfulness in informing their people 
are they reaping fruit. God is evidently 
with them and blessing them in great 
measure. 

I met with the Northern Nebraska 
Conference of the Missouri Synod at 
Norfolk on August 17th and was given 
an opportunity to speak for the National 
Christian Association. My obligation to 
these pastors for the courtesies shown 
me and especially to the President of 
the Conference, Rev. M. Adam, is very 
great. May God reward them. 

Following my talk, after some friend- 
ly discussion, the following resolutions 
were adopted : 

The North Nebraska District Confer- 
ence of the Missouri Synod. 

Norfolk, Nebraska, August 18, 191 /. 

Resolved, That we endorse the pur- 
poses and objects of the National Chris- 
tian Association in its opposition to se- 
cret societies. And that we deem these 
aims and efforts of the society worthy, 
of our support. 

Rev. M. Adams, President ; Rev. J. F. 
E. Sciiltepsiek; Secy. Pro Tem. 

W. I. Phillips. 



E/^ STERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

RE\'. W. r>. STODDARD. 

I am glad to rei:)ort another month of 
success in the Eastern division of our 
work. Ohio always responds well to 
efforts put forth. Since my last report 
I have \isited (^rrville, \\>ilersville, 
Smithville, and Sonnenl:)erg in Wayne 
County. From thence I went to Mans- 
field, Lima, P)luffton, Pandora, Belle- 
fontaine. Belle Center, Huntsville, and 



156 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



\\'est Liberty. During the month I gave 
nineteen lectures and addresses, and se- 
cured one hundred and thirty-four sub- 
scriptions to the Cynosure, for all of 
which I give God the glory. 

I worked "amid dangers seen and un- 
seen." Seeking to help an elderly 
brother gather his cherries, the ladder 
broke and I fell several feet. My in- 
juries were somewhat painful, but not 
serious. Evidently the Lord wishes me 
to continue in the work for a time yet. 
\Miile stopping at a hotel last spring in 
Huntington, Indiana, the watchman 
came shouting through the halls at 2 130 
o'clock in the morning, and, rapping on 
the doors, announced that the hotel Avas 
on fire. There was considerable excite- 
ment and alarm, but the fire was extin- 
guished without much damage. It seems 
wonderful that, when I travel so much, 
I have escaped so well. 

While going from Lima to Huntsville, 
Ohio. I had occasion to change cars at 
Russells Point, a summer outing place. 
^^'hile waiting, I was told that a man 
had just been carried by to a place be- 
yond a cottage. Hearing a splash in the 
water, and seeing people running that 
way, I followed and sought to learn the 
cause of the commotion. The man had 
been thrown into some muddy water and 
was getting out. I inquired, What does 
this mean? and was told "Oh, it's some 
lodge!" I suggested that it must be the 
"Ancient Order of ]\Iuskrats !'' The 
candidate was taking the initiation (if 
such it was) good naturedly. There was 
music and much of what some people 
would call fun. To say the least, it was 
very dangerous business. 

During my brief stay at home I went 
to Oakton, \^irginia, and delivered an 
antilodge message in the Church of the 
Brethren there. The attendance was 
large, and there were expressions of ap- 
preciation. I preached a sermon at a 
union meeting in the East Falls, Vir- 
ginia, Baptist church on Sabbath even- 
ing, August 5th. The Presbyterian pas- 
tor. Rev. Mr. Davidson, said my mes- 
sage was "pure gospel'' and I ought to 
preach it wherever I went. 

I am now near Lebanon, Pennsyl- 
vania. A camp meeting in Kreider's 
Grove closed at an early hour this morn- 
ing. It was regarded as one of the most 
blessed yet held at this place. The fer- 



ver of the Spirit was manifest from 
start to finish and multitudes were made 
to rejoice in the God of their salvation. 
For several days prior to coming here I 
attended a camp meeting of our Radical 
United Brethren friends at Rhodes' 
Grove near Chambersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. These camps have had annual 
gatherings for twenty years past and 
are well sustained and largely attended. 
Brother D. M. Landis has the oversight 
of the camp at Kreider's Grove and 
Elder Daniel A. Powell at Rhodes' 
Grove. Both of these men are in full 
accord with the N. C. A. work and have 
given me the best opportunity in their 
power for the presentation of antilodge 
messages. I have not attended these 
camps for some years because, as a rule, 
meetings take me to Ohio. It was very 
cheering to hear from those who said I 
had been missed, and that my coming 
was most welcome. The camp at 
Rhodes' Grove has recently expended 
many thousands of dollars in improve- 
ments, among which is the large new 
auditorium, seating 4,000. Rev. E. W. 
Musgrave of Bremen, Ohio, had charge 
of the evangelistic effort there for the 
third year. His preaching was with un- 
usual power. I noted that men well 
fitted for the work in hand are in charge 
at both of these camps. 

A trip to Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, 
enabled me to address a house full of 
people gathered , for a prayer service on 
a farm nearby. A like opportunity was 
found at a mission of the Brethren in 
Christ at Chambersburg. I go to a 
"Harvest Home'' meeting, the Lord 
willing, to-day, and am seeking to be 
"diligent in business, fervent in spirit, 
serving the Lord," as he gives oppor- 
tunity. 



FROM EVANGELIST J. L, DAVIS. 

I am writing a few lines while resting, 
to let you know something of my trip 
from Kentucky to Missouri. My wife 
and I left Kentucky for Missouri on 
June 26th in a rig (the old way), and so 
we traveled slowly, seeing the country. 
We also saw how badly the lodges had 
injured the churches. We spent one 
week passing through Indiana and one 
week passing through Illinois, and about 
two weeks in getting to Lundy, Texas 
County, Missouri, where my home is. So 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



157 



you see we had a chance to see things 
as they are. 

At one place we saw a large church, 
in the cornerstone of which the square 
and compass and the letter "G" were cut, 
showing that the Grand Master had done 
his work well. So we scattered tracts in 
good shape in that place. I don't know 
just how much good they may do, but I 
hope it will be much. Brethren, tract 
distribution is a good way to get the 
truth before the people. They will read 
a tract when they will not listen to one 
of us expose the lodge. So I hope to 
scatter more tracts. 

I am to be in this state about two years 
before I go back East, if the Lord so 
wills it. This southern part of Missouri 
is poor country. I don't expect to get 
much money in the Ozarks, but I intend 
to hit ''the hound dog lodge," for here is 
where it started. Think of it, you can 
become a Hound Dog for $25 ! So if 
any Cynosure readers are dissatisfied 
with yourselves, come to me and be a 
Hound Dog (Phil. 3:2, Rev. 22:15), but 
as for me I am satisfied with the way 
that the Lord made me (Gen. 1:26-27). 
So, brethren, go on with the good work 
of exposing the w^orks of men. Yours 
on the firing line, 

J. L. Davis, Evangelist. 

Rolla, Missouri. 



AN UNCLEAN PERSON. 

[The name of the preacher and of his 
lodges is in our possession. — Editor.] 

Algiers, La., August 10, 19 17. 
Dear Brethren : 

That the many readers of the Chris- 
tian Cynosure may understand some 
of the abnominations tolerated by secret 
lodges I am sending you the following 

unimpeachable evidence : Rev. 

, for the last twenty-eight years 

pastor of two of the important Baptist 
churches, and for more than twenty 
years General Worthy Superior and 
Supreme Dictator of the and 



lodges and also a member of 

several other orders, died in the early 
part of this week. He had been sep- 
arated from his lawful wife for ap- 
proximately twenty-two years and for 
nearly eight years he was said to be liv- 
ing openly with another woman as her 



husband, although he was never legally 
divorced from his first wife. 

He was insured in all his orders, and 
upon his death his legal wife decided to 
claim the benefits of his insurance and 
at once employed legal counsel to that 
end. Both women claimed the body, 
both made funeral arrangements, and 
both had separate graves dug in the 
cemetery. The body lay in state at the 
Baptist church, where high carnival 
raged and pandemonium reigned su- 
preme. 

Yesterday the Odd-Fellows, clad in 
their lodge paraphernalia, took charge 
of. the remains at the church and the 
other orders also assembled there to at- 
tend the funeral, and to the disgust of 
every decent person, the most disgrace- 
ful scenes took place. His fellow lodge 
preachers gathered at the church to sing 
his praises, but there was so much ex- 
citement and threats made to draw dead- 
ly weapons and do bodily harm, by the 
partisans of the two contending women 
(the lodges siding with his common law 
wife), that no services could be held 
save the Odd-Fellow's ceremony. In a 
disgraceful melee they marched to the 
cemetery and deposited the remains in 
the grave furnished by the woman with 
whom this high lodge man had openly 
lived for eight years. 

Can the negroes ever expect to reach 
a high moral state or obtain the respect 
of other races so long as they cleave to 
such unclean characters as leaders and 
ministers? There are ministers and 
lodge adherents here who declare that 
these disgusting and disgraceful facts 
should not be published lest it "hurt the 
race." As long as such things are con- 
cealed and condoned just so long will the 
negro race be weighed and found want- 
ing. The Bible says, "Them that sin re- 
buke before all, that others also may 
fear." This man, posing as a minister 
of the Gospel, sinned greviously and 
boasted of it, his life therefore should 
be publicly exposed that others may 
fear. Secret societies disrupt churches, 
corrupt society, pervert courts of justice, 
conceal crime of every description and 
damn the souls of those who trust in 
them for salvation. How can any con- 
scientious Christian remain in such a 
foul nest of unclean birds? 

'True Reporter.'* 



158 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Argenta, Arkansas, August 8, 1917. 
Dear Cynosure: 

I have come from Lakeside, Arkansas, 
where in our tent meetings sixteen sin- 
ners were saved from their sins and from 
their lodges also. There were three 
white people saved — two men and a lit- 
tle boy — making nineteen in all. White 
people attended the meeting every night. 
We gave them seats in the tents and the 
Gospel saved them just as it did the 
black people. The white people gave me 
a list of their names and asked me to 
spread it before the Lord and pray for 
them, so I have the list and keep it be- 
fore the Lord, and God is working at 
Lakeside. 

One day I taught the Sunday school 
lesson on ''Ahaz, the Faithless King'' 
(2 Chron. 28:1-5, 20-27). I explained 
the third verse, and told them that in- 
cense was a mixture of frankincense and 
other fragrant things and was not to 
be used commonly. It was offered as a 
symbol of prayer (Ex. 30:8, Luke 
1:10). and the priests burnt it morning 
and evening on the altar of incense. I 
showed that Ahaz burned the incense be- 
fore idol gods and not before the Lord. 
\\'hile I was showing the difference be- 
tween true and idol worship a white man 
sitting outside the tent stood up and 
with tears in his eyes said, 'T know all 
about that incense. I was reared a Cath- 
olic and their priests use it in the same 
ways as Ahaz did. I am so glad I have 
found Jesus my Saviour, who saved me 
from the idol worship of the Catholic 
church." I said, Thank God for your 
testimony, my brother. 

After Sunday services were over and 
the II o'clock services began I saw two 
men sitting just inside of the tent. They 
looked strange to me. I had not ever 
noticed them in the meeting before. 
Somehow God gave me a discerning 
spirit (1 Cor. 12:10). I could see they 
had the wrong spirit and my husband 
noticed them, too. A white sister 
stepped up to me and said, "Sister Rob- 
erson, there are some lodgemen here to- 
day. They want to see 'Freemasonry 
at a Glance,' " so I said tO' her. You 
may go to my room and bring my grip. 
I had forgotten it that morning. I took 
the grip and took out ''Freemasonry at 



a Glance" and opened it so one of the 
black men could get a view of it. I saw 
him turn ashy and nudge the other man. 
I said to myself. They are Masons. I 
handed a book to one of the brothers to 
show to them. They looked at the books 
a long time. After a while I called for 
the books. One of them said, 'T will 
pay for this book, but I can take it with- 
out pay. This is our property." I said. 
Do you all run the N. C. A. publishing 
house? He said, ''No." I said. How, 
then, can you take what doesn't belong 
to you? They both paid me and went 
away, but told others that they had taken 
the books away from me. 

One man, a Baptist preacher, got 
saved from Masonry and he told the 
whole congregation that Masonry was 
nothing but a curse to any people. The 
Masons said they were going to kill him. 
He said, "I am not afraid of them. If 
they bother me about their lying order 
it will not be good for them." So they 
let him alone. 

One man said that all the secret orders 
are lies and frauds. He said they were 
going to initiate a man into the Knights 
of Pythias one night, and when they 
showed him that bed of steel spikes and 
told him he would have to jump on it 
he got so scared he said, 'T will die be- 
fore I will jump on that thing," and he 
made for the window to jump out. One 
of the brother Knights drew his pistol 
and said, 'Tf you go to that window I 
will blow your brains out." That is all 
that kept him from jumping out of the 
second-story window. He left the hall 
that night and has not been there since. 

A sister at Lakeside told me that a 
big, black, educated negro came down 
there from Forrest City and got her 
husband and all the people he could fool 
to come to Forrest City and join his 
lodge. She said he told my husband 
he would give him a dollar a head for all 
the men he could get to come and join, 
"and," she said, "do you know. Sister 
Roberson, every one of those men let 
that negro fool them out of $25 apiece." 
He told them to pay $25, and then their 
wives would get their insurance paid 
right away if they should happen to die 
suddenly. She said, "And, do you know, 
we have not seen that negro since, after 
he initiated them all that night? He told 



September, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



159 



my husband to come to Forrest City the 
next week and he would pay the dollar 
for all the members he got. Five men 
went up there, and we haven't seen or 
heard of him since." She told the story 
in such a comical way that I could noi 
keep from laughing. 

She said that after that a man came 
to set up the Royal Circle. "We jumped 
into that," she said, "as did all the ne- 
groes in the settlement. It took them 
all night to initiate us. We paid $10.50 
apiece to join that thing. I wanted to 
be initiated so much that I could hardly 
wait for my turn. After a while they 
came in and blindfolded me and carried 
me up on a high scaffold. Then they 
pulled the hoodwink off my eyes and 
showed me a table of steel nails just as 
sharp as they could be and told me I 
had to fall on them. Then they jerked 
the hoodwink back over my eyes and a 
man shoved me backward. Sister Rob- 
erson, I squalled like a wildcat. It was 
enough to scare me to death. I lost my 
senses." I said Did you fall on the 
nails? "Xo," she said, 'T fell into an 
old tent cloth or something and those 
men just jerked me up and down in that 
thing till I hit up against the ceiling. 
Sometimes I struck on my face. I never 
was in such a fix in my life. You know, 
Sister Roberson, how a woman's clothes 
would fly when she is being pitched 
around like that." I said. What a 
shame ! 

Another woman that was sitting there 
said, "Yes, they made a woman faint 
away one night. W^hen she was pushed 
into the canvas her foot broke through 
and her leg was hanging down through 
the canvas, and those strange men just 
kept throwing her up till we told them 
to take her out of that sheet. They 
nearly killed one man ; they let him fall 
and almost broke his neck. He went 
about here for weeks with his head on 
one side. That was the last night in 
the Royal Circle for me and my hus- 
band, and ten dollars and a half apiece 
was gone. I never went into that old 
vulgar hall again. They will never throw 
me up in another old sheet like that any 
more. The lodge grafters are getting 
the young people in the orders now. 
They can't fool us old ones any more." 

I thanked God for having brought 



them out. I could see the influence of 
Masonry in the canvas used. That is 
what they have in the Masonic lodge ; 
the Royal Circle is one of the litttle har- 
lots. Lizzie Roberson. 

MRS. RANDLE'S LETTER. 

Xew Orleans, Louisiana, 

August 6th, 191 7. 
Dear Cynosure : 

This will inform you that I still have 
a "mind to work." I have been suffer- 
ing with malaria, which has prevented 
me from doing all that I had hoped to 
do by this time. But, thank the Lord, 
I have had an opportunity of firing a 
few shots into the Devil's camp. 

At Kenner, Louisiana, the Daughters 
of the Tabernacle had a large funeral, 
and, as I had been invited some time 
previously by the pastor of the church 
to be in that city, I took nearly all of 
my tracts with me. I found that I 
would not be able to speak before night, 
so I gave the tracts out. A Knight of 
Tabor who had been an old friend of 
Mr. Randle came to me and asked if I 
had gone crazy to give out such tracts 
on such an occasion. I told him that I 
felt that God had called me to that 
place at that time, to warn men and 
women to flee from the wrath to come. 

He said, "Mr. Randle is a secret or- 
der man." I said, Yes, and until he 
joined secret societies he was a good 
husband, but after he persuaded me to 
join, and I learned that their works were 
of the Devil instead of God, it led to the 
breaking up of our home. 

He said, "You may go on giving out 
tracts exposing secret societies, but some 
day you shall pay for it with your life." 
My answer to him was, I have only one 
life to give. At night I lectured at the 
church and was kindly received by the 
pastor, Rev. Mr. Delond. 

At Luling, Louisiana, I found the 
lodge holding great preeminence over the 
church. As the lodges have been set up 
by ministers of the gospel it will be very 
hard to break them up. Rev. Mr. Wash- 
ington, the present pastor, invited me to 
come any time and strike at all sin. 
Pray that God may keep me strong for 
the work. I am hoping to go to Atlanta 
for the convention in September. Yours 
for Jesus, (Mrs.) Alice E. Randle. 



160 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1917 



REPORT OF SOUTHERN AGENT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

I have been here on the Gnlf coast 
several days and have delivered a num- 
ber of sermons and lectures, all of which 
were listened to by fair-sized audiences. 
I lectured last night, August 6th, at the 
St. Paul M. E. church, Rev. M. P. John- 
son, D. D., pastor, to a large congrega- 
tion, which gave me a hearty ovation at 
the close of my address. Dr. Johnson 
and Prof. J. W. Randolph, although both 
are ]\Iasons, declared that they consid- 
ered it an honor to hear such a whole- 
some and instructive lecture, which if 
heeded will prove of untold benefit to 
their race. They are both readers of 
the CvxosuRE and declared that what I 
had said is the truth. 

I conducted a fifteen days' revival at 
the First Baptist church, Pass Christian, 
iMississippi, last month, during which five 
souls were saved from sin and were 
joined to the church. I also conducted a 
four days' Ministers' and Deacons' In- 
stitute at St. Peter Baptist church, Rev. 
C. Kane, pastor. New Orleans. The con- 
gregations were small, but intensely in- 
terested in Bible truth. Rev. Mr. Kane 
highly commended the instructions and 
declared that the lodges are paralyzing 
the churches. 

Mrs. Jesse Burton, one of the leading 
women of iMandeville, Louisiana, at 
whose home I rested in January, said to 
me a few days ago, "Dr. Davidson, I 
am still reading the Cynosure. I read 
every line in it each month, it has helped 
me to see the light, and I have come out 
of the lodge. I can see its evil influences 
now as never before. God bless your 
work and the Cynosure.'' Miss B. J. 
Broadway of New Orleans, a graduate 
of the New Orleans University and an 
influential young lady, wrote me thus : 
"Dr. Davidson, I have read the 
Cynosure and the little book on the 
'Evolution of the Negro Race,' and I am 
deeply impressed with the truth and in- 
formation they convey. I gladly give 
you my subscription to the Cynosure 
and pray that God may grant great suc- 
cess to you." Thus you can see that 
God's truth is marching on. 

I have also preached and lectured in 
Austerlitz Baptist, St. John Baptist and 



Branch Bell Baptist churches, all of New 
Orleans, since my last letter. 

The Odd-Eellows' lodge of Pass Chris- 
tian, Mississippi, has gone out of ex- 
istence and the Masonic lodge is almost 
bankrupt and has lost practically all of 
its members, praise God. "Every plant 
which my heavenly Father hath not 
planted shall be rooted up." The secret 
lodge is not a plant of God but a plant 
of the Devil, therefore it cannot stand, 
but must be rooted up. 

I thank God that, though not well, I 
am better than I have been and am able 
to keep up and on guard. May the army 
of National Christian Association work- 
ers and the Cynosure live long to do 
service for God. 



THE BOOK FOR SOLDIERS. 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 15. — Bibles 
for American soldiers and sailors, to be 
given by the Scripture Gift Mission of 
Philadelphia, will carry a foreword by 
President Wilson urging the troops to 
read the Scriptures diligently. The pres- 
ident has written this inscription: 

"The Bible is the word of life. I beg 
that you will read it and find this out 
for yourselves — read, not little snatches 
here and there, but long passages that 
will really be the road to the heart of it. 

"You will find it full of real men and 
women not only, but also of things you 
have wondered about and been troubled 
about all your life, as men have been 
always ; and the more you read the more 
it will become plain to you what things 
are worth while and what are not ; what 
things make men happy — loyalty, right 
dealing, speaking the truth, readiness to 
give everything for what they think 
their duty, and, most of all, the wish 
that they may have the real approval of 
the Christ, who gave everything for 
them — and things that are guaranteed 
to make men unhappy — selfishness, cow- 
ardice, greed, and everything that is low 
and mean. 

"When you have read the Bible you 
will know that it is the word of God, 
because you will have found it the key 
to your own heart, your own happiness, 
and your own duty. 

"WooDRow Wilson."' 



SPECIAL BARGAINS 

Reductions on Antisecret 
Books 



SEARCH LIGHTS ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 



r 



Our Inventory shows about forty differ- 
ent kinds of books and pamphlets-^dds 
and ends — which, on account of the limited 
supply, it will not pay to advertise in our 
general catalog. 

While they last we offer them at reduced 
prices. Some are in perfect condition, 
while others are shopworn or slightly dam- 
aged. We have made our prices according- 
ly and will give you the best copies we can. 

This list offers a fine selection of litera- 
ture on reform lines and after our supply is 
gone, much of it will be impossible to ob- 
tain. 

Terms — Cash with order. If you order 
something which has been sold out we will 
refund your overpayment unless you au- 
thorize us to substitute at our discretion. 
This is distinctly a cash proposition; do not 
order C. O. D. or on approval. 

Cynosure Subscribers, new or old, who 
pay their subscription one year in advance 
and send 50 cents additional ($1.50 in all), 
or any old subscriber who sends in a new 
yearly subscription with 50 cents additional 
($1.50 in all), may select one dollar's worth 
of the books in this list, which will be sent 
postpaid to one address. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 
850 W. Madison St.. Chicago, 111. 



SCRAP BOOKS 

Containing 31 "Cynosure" (old series) tracts. 
A valuable collection of antilodge literature. 
Paper cover, price, 20 cents. 



LIGHT ON FREEMASONRY, APPE:>I- 

DIX TO 

By Eld. David Bernard, who was the first 
Mason to publicly secede following the abduc- 
tion of Wm. Morgan. Paper cover, price, 10 
cents. 

FIVE IN ONE 

Morgan's Exposition; History of the Abduc-- 
tion of Morgan; Confession of the Abduction of 
Morgan, by Valance; Bernard's Reminiscences 
of Morgan Times; and Oaths and Penalties of 
S3 Degrees of Freemasonry, bound together. 
Cloth cover, price, 50 cents. 



PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
THE SIXTH ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION, N. C. A. 

At SjTacuse, N. T., 1874. Addresses by Rev. 

B. T. Roberts, Chas. D. Green (Mayor of Ba- 
tavia, N. Y., during Morgan excitement), Pres. 

C. A. iBlanchard, Rev. D. P. Rathbun, Rev. J. 
R. Baird (ex-Mason), Mrs. C. B. Miller, Elder 
David Bernard, and others. Paper cover, 150 
pages, price, 20 cents. 



REMINISCENCES OF MORGAN" TIMES. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 10 cents. 

REVIEW OF TWO MASONIC AD- 

DRESSES 

By Eld. John G. Steams. Paper cover, 72 
pages, price, 5 cents. 



RITUALS. 



PATRIARCHS MILITANT 

Adopted by Sov. Grand Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd-Fellows, 1885. Copy of charge 
book with mflitary diagrams, etc. Paper cover, 
25 cents. 



DANGER SIGNALS NO. 1 

Testimonies with portraits of Dr. J. M. Gray, 
Joseph Cook, Dr. A. J. Gordan, Mrs. Hannah 
J. Bailey, and others. Cloth cover, price, t5 
cents. 



DANGER SIGNALS NO. 2 

Testimonies with portraits of Wendell Phil- 
lips, Chas. Francis Adams, Frances E. Wlllard, 
Rev. James P. Stoddard, and others. Cloth 
cover, price, 15 cents. . 



GOOD TEMPLARISM 

An exposition of the Lodge, Temple, and 
Council degrees. Paper cover, 25 cents. 

KNIGHTS OF LABOR 

An exposition of the order. Including un- 
written work. Paper cover, 20 cents. 



KNIGHTS OF THE ORIENT 

Ritual of the Ancient Order of the Orient; 
side degree. Paper cover, 25 centa 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES ON SE- 
CRET SOCIETIES 

By Rev. W. P. McNary, Rev. James Williams, 
Pres. J. Blanchard, Pres. H. H. George, and 
others. Fourteen addresses bound together. 

Cloth cover, price, 60 cents. 

THE CARPENTER BOOKLET 

Containing the testimonies of Deacon Phllo 
Carpenter; teachers and officers in AmerlcA* 
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HOLDEN WITH CORDS 

By E. E. Flagg. A thrilling narrative which 
will hold the interest of adults and children 
and at the same time give them the true ac- 
count of the Morgan times. The covers of some 
have been damaged by water, but the pages are 
in good condition. 384 pages; cloth cover, price, 
35 cents; paper cover, 25 cents. 

BROKEN SEAL, THE 

Personal reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan. By Samuel D. Greene, a 
member with William Morgan of the Masonic 
lodge at Batavia, N. T. Mr. Greene became a 
famous anti-Masonic lecturer and because of it 
suffered persecutions by the Masons. Paper 
cover, 304 pages, price, 25 cents. 

CONDEMNATION OF SECRET SO- 
CIETIES 

By Rev. L. V. Harrell (United Brethren). 
Paper covers, 3 cents. 

MYSTICAL LIFE, THE, AND HOUSE- 
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A compilation of Methodist et al. testimonies 
with portraits of prominent men: Dr. J. M. 
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MISCELLANEOUS 



HELPS TO BIBLE STUDY 

With practical notes on the books of Scrip- 
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Types and Symbols; Analysis of the Books of 
the Bible. Cloth cover, 196 pages, price, 15 
sents. 

SECRET INSTRUCTIONS OF THE 
JESUITS and CONFESSIONS TO 
A PRIEST 

Both books are by Thomas B. Leyden, Evan- 
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America. Contains the Jesuit oath. Paper cov- 
ers; price for the two books, 30 cents. 

DIVORCE AND REMARRIAGE 

By Elder I. J. Rosenberger. An appeal for 
reform in our marriage laws. Paper cover, 48 
pages, price, 5 cents. 

GURY'S DOCTRINES OF THE 
JESUITS— English Edition. 
Translated from the Latin Into the French by 
M. Paul Bert, member of the Chamber of Dep- 
uties and Professor at the Faculty of Sciences. 
"The Doctrines of the Jes-uits, translated into 
French by M. Paul Bert, caused the expulsion 
of the Jesuits from France." — Lequere. Paper 
cover; 612 pages, price, 50 cents. 



THE OPEN CONFESSION. 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address steno- 
graphically reported for the National Christian 
Association at its Annual Meeting, April 8, 1910. 

The relation of the Christian, and especially 
the Christian minister, to the secret oath- bound 
lodge. 

A Personal Testimony. — Three things that 
kept Dr. Gray from joining a lodge. 

Attacking Principles, Not Persons.— This is 

within our guaranteed constitutional rights and 
is of fundamental importance. ^ 

Describing a IVIighty Adversary. — Not merely 
an evil influence, but a personal spiritual beinff 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beingrs like 
himself. And what this Enemy can do and is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System. — Showing 
that it is truly contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 5 cents a 
copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Historical Sketch ; How the Business is Man- 
aged ; Publications; Its Work and Its Workers; 
Co-operating Organizations ; What Is Accom- 
plished. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
packasre of 25 for 25 cents. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS. 

These consist of 20 different tracts, envelope 
size, of from four to sixteen pages each. Some 
of them are: Why I Left the Rebekah Lodge. 
Col. Geo. R. Clark, seceder, on Why I Left th« 
Masons. Experience of Stephen Merritt, the 
Evangelist. Graciously Delivered from Seven 
Secret Societies. The Church and the Lodge. 
Baptist Testimonies. Lodge Religion. The 
"Good Man" Argument. Masonic Obligations. 
Catechism of Oddfellowship. Oddfellowship a 
Religious Institution. Why Do Men Remain 
Oddfellows? The Worship of Secret Societies 
Offered to Satan. Sketch of National Christian 
Association. Two Nights in a Lodge Room. 
The Secret Poe of the Sabbath. How to Save 
Christians from Lodges. Lodge Burial Services. 
Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
surance Lodges? Ethics of Marriage and Home 
Life. Washington, What Kind of a Freemason 
Was He? College Fraternities. Fraternities in 
State Schools. For Women Who Think — Wom- 
en s Lodges. Tha Patriot and the Lodge. 
Each, 2 cents; an assortment, 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. Madison St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT . 

The author, Mr. B. M. Holt, was for many years a lodge member. He resigned his lodge- 
connection in all due form on account of scruples of conscience; he was not dropped on account 
of delinquency, but voluntarily resigned and received his regular "letter of dimission." 

The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World in particular, 
shows almost exclusively from quotations of prominent Woodmen, official publications, supply 
houses, and others, what the Woodmen teach and do, and points out wherein their teachings and 
practises disagree with Christian principles. The little booklet is sure to be of inestimable value 
in the hands of pastors and others that have occasion to warn a Christian brother against 
joining a lodge, and should be available also in persuading those who have already taken this 
step, to leave the lodge. 

The little paper-covered book comprises 72 pages, size 5x7%. It contains four illustrations of 
secret society paraphernalia. The list price is 25 cents, postpaid. 

Address NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 850 W. Madison St., Chicago 



Jotlce to ReadcrtI— When you finish reading this magazine plaxje a 1-cent stamp on this notice, hand same to 
nSsSa emDloyee/and It wiU be placed In the hands of our soldiers or sailors at the front. No wrapping. No 
MIS. A. S. BURLESON, Postmaster General. 




mm 




Vol, L. 



CHICAGO, OCTOBER, 1917 



Number 6 I 




jmtNfliii Peace 

Tlora SDiif cit Hiooli 

Jftttumn-fbe very word holds cadences 

Of sofn low winds that play o'er searing fields, 

Tn mat late burst of glory when the trees 

Hre roDed in red-gold bues— when nature wields 

ller fairy wands to bring sleep to tbe year. 

JIutumn-it bolds tie warmtb of c4)eering fires, 
Cbe kettle steaming on a garnisbed beartb, 
tbe gatbering of looes, tbe twang of lyres 
Hccompanying tbe reguiem of eartb, 
Olbo lays ber down to rest witbout a fear. 

Knowing full well renewal waits for ber, 
tbat resurrection's seeds are in ber palm; 
$0 sweetly sleeps witb never restless stir. 
Secure, at peace, tbe spirit's migbty calm 
Unbroken by tbe falling of one tear. 

—Springfield Kepubllcan. 




OFFICIAU ORGAN, 
lOCENTJ* ACOPY 



NATIONAL CHRIJTIAN 
EJTABUJHED lete 



AJJOCIATION 

1.00 AYEAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

PobNsfied Montmy by fhe National Christian 
Asaoetatlon. 



JAMES £DWIN PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor. 
850 West Madison Street, Cldcago. 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 
PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 
PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for the Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we wiU 
■'make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS shouid be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 
Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, 

at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 

March 3, 1875. 



CONTENTS 



Autumn Peace, poem, by Flora Shu felt 

Rivola Cover 

The Nameless Seeker, poem, by Annie 

Johnson Flint 161 

Odd-Fellows' "Grudge" Growth .......... 161 

Resume Relations with French Masons — 

New York Evening World 162 

"Keeper of the Zoo" Took Animals Home 

— Evening Star, Washington, D, C 162 

Government Bars Lodge Club Houses. .. .162 
"Never-Changing-Rate" Fraternal Insur- 
ance 163 

Antiaircraft Lodge — Masonic Home Jour- 
nal 163 

Eagle Buffets — Eagle Magazine 164 

Odd-Fellows Seek Tax Exemption—/. O. 

0. F. Lodge Record 164 

The Spirit of Antichrist in Trades Union- 
ism — The Friend of Israel 164 

Pope Seeks Temporal Power — Chicago 

Herald 165 

The Cords of a Man and the Bands of 
Love, by Pres. C. A. Blanchard, D. D....165 

Profession vs. Practice 169 

The Farmers' Union 169 

Canadian Lodges Seek Government Con- 
trol 170 

"Lodge Meetings," Calls on Lady Love — 

Omaha. Bee 171 

White Shrine of Jerusalem 171 

Odd-Fellows Appropriate Trust Funds — 

Brotherhood .172 

M. W. A. Stop "Horse Play" 172 

Bootlegging Masons 172 

Not Fifty Per Cent. Moral 172 

Luther and the Constitution of the United 

States, by Prof. Geo. A. Romoser 173 

The Song of the Umbrella, by Maggie 

• Wheeler Ross 176 

Unionizing the Public Service — Editorial, 
Chicago Tribune 177 



Adams, John Quincy, Letters of 178 

Heyday of Unionism, Clippings frohi the 

Daily Press 180 

Editorial : 

Dishonest Strategics 184 

A Mistrial 185 

Two Per Cent. Patriotism 185 

Masonic Treason 185 

Whose Ox Is Gored 186 

More Knights 186 

News of Our Work : - 
Friends of Soldiers, Attention ! by Rev. 

A. M. Malcolm 186 

Iowa Christian Association, Treasurer's 

Report 187 

Secretary Phillip's Letter 187 

The Orange Lodge, A. Seceder's Testi- 
mony 188 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B. 

Stoddard 188 

Contributions 189 

Southern Agent's Report, Rev. F. J. 

Davidson 190 

''Lizzie Woods' Letter" , 190 

From Arkansas, Mrs. Lillie L. High- 
tower 192 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 
GENERAL OFFICERS. 
President Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president, Rev. John F. Heemstra; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thom*8 C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kit- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Lea- 
man, George Slager and Wm. M. Trap. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below : 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 3118 Fourteenth 
St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St, 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N. D. 

Rev. Riilemon Bedc. Grafton, Calif. 

Bd. G. B. Crockett. Deraott Afk. 



Vol. L, No. 6, 



CHICAGO 



October, 1917 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—^cts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus ansvkrered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have I 
said nothing. 
—John 18:20 



THE NAMELESS SEEKER. 

ANNIE JOHNSON FLINT. 

We are not told his name — this "rich 
young ruler" 
Who sought the Lord that day ; 
We only know that he had great pos- 
sessions 
And that — he went away. 

He went away — from joy and peace and 
power : 
From love unguessed, untold ; 
From that eternal life that he was seek- 
ing, 
Back to his paltry gold ; 

Back to the weary discontent that 
brought him 
First to the Saviour's side, 
With heart that hungered still and soul 
that thirsted, 
Unblest, unsatisfied ; 

So deaf he could not hear the call to 
service 
That all the world should bless, 
So blind he cauld not see the great pos- 
sessions 
He bartered for the less. 

He went away ; he kept his earthy treas- 
ure, 
But oh, at what a cost ! 
Afraid to take the cross and lose his 
riches — 
And God and heaven were lost. 

So far the tinsel bonds that held and 
drew him 
What honor he let slip — 



Comrade of John and Paul and friend of 
Jesus: — 
What glorious fellowship ! 

For they who left their all to follow 
Jesus 
Have found a deathless fame ; 
On his immortal scroll of saints and 
martyrs 
God wrote each shining name. 

We should have read his there — the rich 
young ruler — 
If he had stayed that day; 
Nameless — though Jesus loved him — 
ever nameless 
Because — he went away. 

— Christian Endeavor World. 



ODD-FELLOWS' "GRUDGE" 
GROWTH. ' 

The Odd-Fellows in this country are 
a close second to the Masons in point of 
membership. The secret of their growth 
is out. Read the following from the 
August, 1917, /. O. O. F. Lodge Record: 
"A Story and Its Application. 

'Tast Grand Patriarch LeHuntte's 
reference, in the July issue, to a cham- 
ber of torture which many of us saw 
among other notable' sights of the Thou- 
sand Island region, brings to mind a 
story. 

''Mrs. Andria kept a boarding house. 
It was whispered that the guests were 
none too well fed. One day a neigh- 
bor's wife said to her: 

'' T should think that you would feed 
your boarders better. You can't expect 
them to say a good word for you when 
they leave.' 

" 'Oh. but they do,' replied ]\Irs. An- 
dria ; 'they do. Almost everyone of 



162 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1917. 



them has a grudge against some friend 
or acquaintance and so ahiiost invari- 
abl}' recommends my house to them and 
I gets lots of new boarders that way.' 

"Now, applying this to lodges and en- 
campments man}- will say, and be right 
in saying it, that this is not the proper 
way to get members, Our services 
should recommend us because of the dig- 
nity and propriety of our work, not be- 
cause of our methods of fierceness and 
of making fools of our applicants.'' 



RESUME RELATIONS WITH FRENCH 
MASONS. 



New York Grand Lodge Ignores Atheism 
of French Masonry. 

Tlie Evening World (New York) of 
September ii, 1917, reports the Grand 
Lodge of Masons of that state in ses- 
sion in New York City. Among the ac- 
tions taken, it reports the following: 

"For many years there have been no 
fraternal relations between the Masons of 
this State and members of the Grand 
Orient in France. To facilitate good 
feeling between American members and 
their French comrades, after the army 
arrives on French soil, it was voted to 
resume friendly relations with the 
French jurisdiction. 

"Thomas Penney, Grand Master for 
the State, was authorized to change a 
number of Masonic rules in the interest 
of men who have enlisted. Heretofore 
it has been necessary for candidates for 
the Masonic order to wait six weeks 
while taking their first three degrees. 
Mr. Penney was given permission to cut 
this time to one day." 



"KEEPER OF THE ZOO" TOOK 
ANIMALS HOME. 

Frederick H. Kramer, a florist, has 
filed answer to a suit for maintenance 
brought by his wife, Irene E. Kramer, in 
which she had charged that he brought 
home on various occasions a goat, mon- 
keys, snakes and a small alligator and al- 
lowed the animals and reptiles the free- 
dom of their home in order to terrify 
her. He admits the presence of the ani- 
mals in his home, but explains that he is 
an officer of a social organization known 
as the ''Grotto" and that his title is 
''keeper of the zoo." 

Because of the late hour at which the 



meetings adjourned he was compelled, 
he says, to take home the official goat 
and other specimens, which he had bor- 
rowed for the purposes of the meetings 
from a member of the organization who 
deals in animals and pets. Mr. Kramer 
denies that he failed to tie the goat, but 
admits that once a monkey got loose in 
the house and destroyed a few orna- 
ments. — Evening Star, Washington, 
D. C, Sept. 12, 1917. 



GOVERNMENT BARS LODGE CLUB 
HOUSES. 

In a letter to Representative Howard 
of Georgia, Secretary of War Baker 
makes a ruling that Masons, Odd-Fel- 
lows and other fraternal organizations 
cannot erect club houses in Army camps. 
However, previous orders will stand, 
permitting buildings to be erected by the 
Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus and 
the Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

Secretary Baker says that owing to 
misinformation on the subject, the de- 
partment has been flooded with requests 
from all sorts of religious organizations, 
athletic organizations and fraternal 
bodies asking the right to operate ex- 
clusively for their own membership with- 
in the camps. Secretary Baker points 
out that this could not be done in the 
Army, and that the three organizations 
named for years have been operating 
with the Army, and that in general they 
cover the entire religious make-up of any 
body of men. — Washington (D. C.) Star, 
September 4, 19 17. 

This was a bomb exploded in the fra- 
ternal camp for the Masons, Odd-Fel- 
lows, Woodmen and a host of others 
were planning to enter the cantonments 
with military lodges and entertainment 
for their particular circles. These same 
lodge enthusiasts are now trying to break 
down the ruling of the War Department 
with a flood of protests. They claim that 
they are discriminated against. They fail 
to see — because it does not suit their 
purpose to see — that the War Depart- 
ment has done the only fair and disinter- 
ested thing in providing for the welfare 
of the three great classes of men in these 
camps — Protestants, Catholics, and Jews. 
The lodges are not discriminated against 
since their men are included within these 
three divisions. 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



163 



If the government permitted the Ma- 
sons and Odd-Fellows to erect club 
houses, they could not refuse to permit 
any or all of the other three hundred 
orders to do likewise and they would 
soon have more club houses than govern- 
ment buildings within the camps. And 
then, too. they would have to permit the 
National Christian Association to erect 
club houses for those who don't believe 
in the lodges and that would be "a horse 
of another color." 

The real trouble with the lodges is not 
that they are jealous of the privileges 
granted to the Knights of Columbus, but 
they are exasperated at thus being 
thwarted in their plans to get a harvest 
of members by means of these club 
houses and military lodges, even as they 
did in the Civil and Spanish-American 
wars. 



"NEVER-CHANGING-RATE" FRATER- 
NAL INSURANCE. 

The Woodmen of the World propose 
to issue "whole life guaranteed never- 
changing-rate certificates" of insurance. 
The ground of their guarantee is their 
promise that they "will maintain the 
same reserve . . . as is maintained 
by old line companies." 

The proposed new rates are not given 
but this much is certain, that they will 
not be much less than the rates now 
charged by "old line" mutual companies. 
If they are at a less figure than are of- 
fered by the old line companies, it will be 
because their cost of doing business is 
less. But on the other hand, if the dues 
and expenses of one kind or another, 
which lodge men have to meet, are 
added, the actual cost of the protection 
will undoubtedly exceed the cost of 
whole life insurance in old line com- 
panies. The following is the announce- 
ment in the Sovereign Visitor, Septem- 
ber, 1917: 

"The Society in issuing whole life 
guaranteed never-changing-rate certifi- 
cates, has now placed itself beyond the 
criticism of the old line companies and 
their representatives because the Wood- 
men of the \A'orld will maintain the same 
reserves to care for these whole life cer- 
tificates as is maintained by old line com- 
panies. The reserve will be kept sep- 



arate and distinct from the present re- 
serve of the Society. This will enable 
us to enter states where the Mobile Bill 
demands adequate rates based on the 
National Fraternal Congress table of 
rates and, in our judgment, is the most 
important step taken by our Society in 
its entire history." 

Many Woodmen will doubtless feel 
that the guarantee is a joke. Some of 
them will remember that this same order 
sold tens of thousands of policies con- 
taining the stipulation, "payment to 
cease after twenty years." There was, 
however, a little joker in the agreement 
to which the candidate consented -when 
he joined the order, to the effect that he 
would abide by all rules and regulations 
which should thereafter be made. Then 
at the time when the twenty years period 
was up — when payment of premiums 
was to cease — the members found them- 
selves confronted with new rules abro- 
gating the old contract and requiring 
higher rates because the previous pre- 
miums had been inadequate. 

Our readers will remember the suit 
against the W. O. W\ instituted by Judge 
Seay, a policy holder of Texas, which 
was treated quite fully in the Cynosures 
of May and June, 1916. Judge Seay lost 
his suit (which was a test case involv- 
ing 33,865 other and similar policies) be- 
cause he had forsworn himself to abide 
by future rules. 

All secret orders require that their 
members forswear themselves, and if 
Christians would be obedient to the 
teaching of the Scriptures and shun such 
things, they would be spared a great deal 
of trouble. 



ANTIAIRCRAFT LODGE. 

The Royal Antiaircraft Lodge of 
Freemasons has been consecrated in 
London. Membership will be limited to 
members of the antiaircraft service. 

The Bible used in the ceremony and 
the warrant of the lodge were bound 
with boards cut from the pro]:)eller of a 
Zeppelin brought down in England, and 
part of the regalia of the lodge was 
made of aluminum from the Zeppelins 
brought down at Cuffley and in Essex.— 
Exchange copied by the Masouie Home 
Joiinial. 



164 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917. 



EAGLE BUFFETS. 

The Grand Worthy President of the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles speaks as fol- 
lows in his annual report as published in 
the September, 191 /, issue of the Eagle 
Magazine : 

"Our Fraternity is law-abiding and 
patriotic, ^^'e cannot consistently per- 
mit the institution or maintenance of any 
feature which in any way violates local 
civil law. According to the laws of our 
Order, I have not hesitated to order 
buffets closed, where that social feature 
could not be maintained without violat- 
ing local statutes or ordinances. * * * 

"We crave the approbation of our fel- 
low-men and we insist that, because of 
our aims, we are entitled to their confi- 
dence and respect. The good will of our 
neighbors is absolutely necessary if we 
are ever to accomplish the service to 
mankind we acclaim as the justification 
for our existence. 

"1 am convinced that seventy-five per 
cent of the trouble which Subordinate 
Aeries encounter is either directly or in- 
directly traceable to the buffet. I am 
confident that fully ninety per cent of all 
those disagreeable and reprehensive acts 
which bring our Order into disrepute, 
besmirch its good name and retard its 
grow^th and prosperity, emanate directly 
from the buffet. Such would not be the 
case if buffets were operated in accord- 
ance with our own laws. * * ^^ If our 
Subordinate Aeries will not voluntarily 
comply with the law in this respect, there 
is but one alternative left us — to abolish 
the buffet altogether." 



ODD-FELLOWS SEEK TAX EXEMP- 
TION. 

From proceedings of the New York 
Grand Lodge : 

"Rep. Fish presented a resolution 
which was adopted after discussion by 
Reps. Fish, Borst, Gardner, Westbrook 
and others : "That this Grand Lodge 
lend its moral support to secure a final 
decision of the question of exemption 
from taxation of lodge property under 
subdivision 7 of Sec. 6 of the state tax 
law, and that a committee of five be ap- 
pointed to secure a decision in this mat- 
ter and advise the lodges as to their 
rights and privileges." — /. O. O. F. 
Lodge Record, September, 19 17. 



THE SPIRIT OF ANTICHRIST IN 
TRADES UNIONISM. 

Alongside of the extraordinary move- 
ment in all nations toward the liberation 
of men and peoples under the watch- 
word, "The world set free," there is a 
strange spirit of compulsion slowly steal- 
ing over the people who have been 
"free." In regard to this a well-known 
writer on prophecy says: "Antichrist 
will have power, and it will be com- 
pulsory power used in a compulsory 
way." * * * 

The writer points out the spirit of 
Antichrist as manifested in trade union- 
ism, showing how the world is being pre- 
pared in various ways for the Antichrist 
who shall come. He says, "I am not 
speaking against trade unionism, but 
only thinking of how it acts and reacts. 
Certain leaders issue certain orders and 
those who do not belong to the union, do 
not agree with the resolution, are ground 
under the iron heel of tyranny and 
forced to act against their will. 

"A shoemaker known to me, who had 
seven children, did not belong to the 
shoemakers' union, and when a strike 
occurred he said, 'I have nothing to do 
with your union ; I am going to work as 
usual.' The union officials heard him 
hammering at his work In his house, and 
on their speaking to him he told them 
he had seven children, and could not af- 
ford to be idle, or they would starve. 
The officials said, 'If you don't put your 
tools down we will pull your house down 
and kill the lot of you.' The man was 
forced to yield. Tf you don't join our 
union,' they said, 'we will not give you 
another penny, but we will not in any 
case allow you to work.' I don't think 
you can call that anything but tyranny. 

"What a strange kind of freedom this 
means. . . . Chains and fetters under 
the very plea of freedom. . . . This is 
one of the signs of the times. . . ." — 
The Friend of Israel (London, Eng- 
land.) 



POPE SEEKS TEMPORAL POWER. 

"The pope, so far as this question is 
concerned, is more Jesuit than the 
Jesuits. In conversation he constantly 
refers to the need for a fresh solution of 
this thorny problem. Temporal as well 
as spiritual freedom, he believes, is ab- 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



165 



solutely necessary to the head of the 
Catholic church. 

"His desire to put an end to the 
calamities of the present war is largely 
due to humanitarian motives. The war 
is so terrible and atrocious that an end 
of it is, he thinks, absolutely imperative. 

''Three main motives to which the re- 
cent papal appeal is ascribed are : 

'Tirst, a desire to obtain a seat at the 
peace congress, at which the question of 



the temporal power may be reconsidered 
by the principal world powers. 

"Second, fear of offending powerful 
German Catholics, thereby incidentally 
giving an impetus to the German mod- 
ernist school at Munich, which before 
the war had become restive and undisci- 
plined. 

"Third, fear lest the Austrian Empire, 
the greatest of CathoHc powers, should 
suffer wreck." — Chicago Herald, Sept. 8, 
1917. 



The Cords of a Man and the Bands of Love." 



By President Charles A. Blanchard, Wheaton College, Wheaton, 111. 



The prophet speaking for Jehovah, 
with reference to his relations to his peo- 
ple, says, "I drew them with cords of 
a man, with bands of love." (Hos. 
11:4.) This describes God's method 
with people. He binds them to him- 
self by the ties of human regard and 
affection. When God's people are walk- 
ing in fellowship with him, they are 
necessarily attractive to those who are 
not. It is impossible that a man should 
have the spirit of Christ without pro- 
ducing kindly feelings in those about 
him. 

The common people heard Christ 
gladly. It was the rulers, ecclesiastical 
and civil, who hated and wronged him. 
It is even so to-day. The ordinary man 
or woman is naturally inclined toward 
God. They feel their helplessness. 
They feel their sins. They are many 
times weary. They are often afraid and 
when they find a spirit w^hich is restful 
and strong, which is victorious and hap- 
py, whether they say it aloud or not, they 
long in their hearts for the fellowship 
which has made the Christian man or 
woman what he or she is. 

This principle, that we are attracted 
to persons and institutions dear to those 
we love, has also its more somber side 
for as companionship has oftentimes an 
impulse toward righteousness it many 
times creates a tendency toward evil. 
This will be especially true in regard to 
things which are not thoroughly under- 
stood. A man is naturally inclined to 
like an institution of which some dear 
friend is a member, though he knows 
absolutely nothing about it. 



My Father and My Grandfather. 

A gentleman, not long since, was 
speaking with me regarding a secret or- 
ganization and said, "jNIy father and my 
grandfather were both good men and 
were members of this organization. My 
father did not go near the organization 
for about forty years, but w^hen I was 
coming to be a member of it he attended 
the meeting where I received the de- 
grees." This is only one section of the 
conversation but it illustrates the 
thought >vhich I have in hand. This 
young man was entirely ignorant of the 
character of the order. All he knew was 
that good people whom he loved were 
connected wath it. This made him feel 
that it must be a good organization. It 
is not strange that he felt so and was 
inclined to unite with it. 

When w_e reflect that there is such a 
shameful silence respecting secret asso- 
ciations in the pulpits and the religious 
papers of our country, we can see that 
the tendency toward fellowship with 
such organizations is vastly increased. 
"The bands of a man and the cords of 
love" draw them. There is no light to 
warn them away and therefore before 
they know it they enter upon a slavery 
which will, continue until life ends or 
they break their chains. 

Satan Is Mighty: God Is Almighty. 

While worthy and well meaning men 
by thousands every year are being en- 
trapped by these organizations— many of 
them from the considerations already 
mentioned, some because of simple 
greed, the desire to secure position, prop- 



166 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917 



erty, or friends that they could not by 
their unaided merits obtain, and, as I 
have said when speaking on this subject, 
a few probably because they are crim- 
inals at heart and desire protection and 
fellowship in their crimes — nevertheless 
east, west, north and south God is con- 
tinually breaking the chains and letting 
the captives go free. (Isa. 6i:i.) 

Josiah Drummond, now deceased, for 
many years at the head of the Scottish 
Rite in the Northern Jurisdiction, com- 
plained of ' the indifiference of Free- 
masons to the organization. He said 
that at that time (a number of years 
ago), 30,000 Freemasons were sus- 
pended for non-payment of dues every 
year. In addition to those who thus 
quietly drop out there are, from time to 
time, men who openly and for conscience 
sake declare their independence of the 
oaths which ignorant persons say can 
never be broken. "Once a Mason al- 
ways a Mason" is the epigrammatic form 
in which this foolish pretence is gener- 
ally stated. 

Not long since I spoke of my friend 
in Philadelphia who had been for ten 
years the chaplain and treasurer of a 
Masonic lodge, who was a Christian 
when he united and who, when he found 
that as a Masonic chaplain he was not 
permitted to pray in the name of Jesus, 
left the organization. I saw him this 
summer and asked him whether he was 
still determined to belong to God alone. 
He said that he was, that he had not had 
the slightest inclination to return to the 
lodge altars though he had been re- 
peatedly and recently requested to do so. 

There was rather a remarkable in- 
stance of this power of God to set men 
free at the Old Orchard convention of 
the Christian and Missionary Alliance 
this summer. Brother Paul Rader of 
Chicago had been preaching and the 
altar call was made. Some of us moved 
about among the people to see if there 
were those whom we could help. I was 
providentially directed to a man of per- 
haps forty years, possibly not more than 
thirty-five, who sat at the end of one of 
the seats. As I came up to him I put 
my hand on his shoulder and said to 
him: ''Brother, how is it with you? Is 
everything clear and right?" He re- 



plied, "No, it is not. I was hoping you 
would come and speak to me." I said 
to him, "What is the matter?" He said, 
'T have been a member of seven lodges 
and I am still a member of six, and I 
am not sure what God wants me to do." 
I said, "Very well, God has promised to 
satisfy you. Shall we go forward and 
pray?" He was very willing and we 
went forward to the edge of the plat- 
form and knelt there in prayer. After 
he had prayed I said to him, ''How do 
your lodges look now ?" "Well," he 
said, "I know that five of them are 
wrong. I have left one of them already, 
but there is another one, the seventh, 
about which I am not so sure. Why, 
every man that goes into it is baptized. 
I was baptized into it and they talk about 
Jesus all the while." I said to him, "Are 
the men who are baptized Christians, all 
of them?" "Oh, no," he said, "I would 
not dare to say that." I said, "Does the 
order require them to confess themselves 
Christians and to confess their sins?" 
"No," he said, "it does not." "Well," I 
said, "what do you think of that kind of 
an organization for a Christian man?" 
He said, "I want to go home and pray 
about it, but I will be back here to- 
morrow and I will decide to-night." 

The next day I was preaching at four 
o'clock and I mentioned the fact that I 
had met a gentleman who had been a 
member of seven secret orders who had 
abandoned one and who was considering 
what God required of him respecting the 
others. I had been looking for him 
quite steadily but could not see him in 
the crowd, but when I spoke thus he at 
once stood to his feet and came forward 
to the platform. 

When we were kneeling at the altar 
the night before, I had observed a very 
large gold ring on his left hand with a 
square and compass as the device. 
When he came forward this afternoon 
I saw that he had no ring on his hand. 
Facing the large congregation, he said, 
"Friends, it is true that I have been a 
member of seven different lodges. I am 
an undertaker. My only competitor in 
the town of ten or twelve thousand peo- 
ple where I live and work is a member 
of all the lodges there are, so far as I 
know. I joined these lodges for the 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



167 



purpose of getting my share of the trade 
of the town. I have, however, come to 
the deliberate conclusion that as a Chris- 
tian man I have no right to be united 
with godless and wicked men in fra- 
ternal association. I took off my Ma- 
sonic ring when I went home last night 
and intend to put it into the offering for 
missions on the Sabbath. I shall never 
have any use for it again and I intend 
hereafter to belong to God alone." 

I did not take down his words at the 
time he uttered them and I do not pro- 
fess now to reproduce them exactly, but 
there were hundreds of people who 



\ 



s 



/ 



4^^5 



i^ 




#«^ 



heard what he said and I think they 
will confirm this as a fair statement of 
the intent of the remarks which he made. 
It was very blessed to see him take his 
position, to see how his face had light- 
ened and his whole bearing changed as 
he had passed out from the bondage of 
the lodge into the glorious liberty of a 
son of God. 

After Many Days. 
When I was giving some Bible ad- 
dresses in one of the gospel halls of the 
National Bible Institute of New York, 
a year ago, a young man asked to speak 
with me. I said, "Certaintly, I am glad 



to talk with you. What is it?'' He said, 
"I do not understand your objections to 
secret societies. I am a Freemason and 
have always thought that Freemasonry 
was a good institution. You seem to 
speak and pray as if it was a wicked 
one. What is the reason?" I had a 
brief conversation with him, showing 
him John 18:20, 2 Cor. 6:14-18 and oth- 
er Scriptures of like sort. He was evi- 
dently moved but still did not feel dis- 
posed to declare his independence. 

When I reached New Y^ork this sum- 
mer one of my friends who knew this 
young man and about his whole strug- 
gles, said to me, ''That young man with 
whom you talked last summer on the 
lodge question has come out entirely 
from all secret organizations and is now 
preaching the gospel on the streets with 
great power." 

I cannot tell how many men this sum- 
mer I heard say in testimony meetings 
that God had forgiven their sins and 
saved them from the lodges, but in al- 
most if not every meeting which I at- 
tended, Philadelphia, New Y^ork, Nyack, 
Cleveland, Stony Brook, there were one 
or more to speak of their joy at being 
delivered. 

In the beautiful Johnston Hall at 
Stony Brook Assembly where I was 
entertained, I met almost immediately 
after arrival two men wlio had been 
Knight Templar Freemasons. It was in- 
tensely interesting to see how God led 
them in different ways but to the same 
result. One of them clearly perceived 
the infidel and pagan character of the 
order. He seemed to loathe the system 
with his whole being. The other did not 
see so deeply or feel so intensely. He 
said, 'T came out from the thing because 
it was a sham and a fraud, because it 
was always appealing to vanity or pride 
or desire for self-aggrandizement. I do 
not know that it is very wicked but it 
is unspeakably foolish and frightfully 
mean." 

Here again I do not profess to repeat 
words. I did not take a report of what 
this brother said, but I listened intently 
and remembered, I think with a fair 
degree of accuracy, his statement. It 
is certain that they were both Knight 
Templar Freemasons and that each of 
them for reasons peculiar to himself had 



168 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October. 1917. 



declared his freedom from all associa- 
tion with the order. 

The Truth Makes Free. 

The most vivid impression which has 
been produced upon my mind by this 
summer's experience is not a new one 
but an intensification of an old one. It 
is that the moment a man sees Jesus 
Christ as his Saviour and Lord and 
really accepts him, the chains of- secret 
organizations fall oft his hands as the 
dungeon chains fell from the hands of 
Peter (Acts 12:7). 

I have almost never in my life known 
a man to leave Freemasonry and re- 
lated secret orders except for religious 
reasons. A very few cases I have 
known. Several of them I have men- 
tioned to the readers of the Cynosure; 
the blacksmith in Worcester, Massachu- 
setts, who, when I was lecturing there in 
1870 and 1871, told me that he left the 
order because the Masons were not de- 
cent to his wife. He said that they 
despised him and her because he was a 
blacksmith and that all their pretenses 
to friendship and brotherly love, equality 
and fraternity were lies. He was not a 
pious man and he called the lodge men 
"a set of damned hyprocrites." I would 
not want to say they are all so, prob- 
ably there were some such persons in 
Worcester, Massachusetts, at the time 
but the rule is that men do not cancel 
their membership in lodges until they 
have come into close and loving fellow- 
ship with Jesus Christ. 

The Holy Spirit cannot tolerate such 
a system as Freemasonry. My old 
friend, Andrew Brotherstone, one of the 
most beautiful Christian spirits I ever 
met, said to me, ''Brother Blanchard, I 
have never known a spiritually minded 
man either in this country or in Scotland 
who had any fellowship with the order." 
This has been my experience. 

Consider for a moment the remark 
made to me, reported in the early para- 
graphs of this article. Here is a man 
who was inclined toward Freemasonry 
because his grandfather and father were 
members of the order and were good 
men, yet the father himself did not go 
near the organization for forty years 
until his son was about to be initiated. 
One may say if he had not thought well 
of the organization he would not have 



desired that his son should become a 
member. I am not required to speak to 
this question. If he did think the organ- 
ization was a good one, why did he re- 
main away from its meetings forty 
years? It is true that the fact that he 
went to his son's initiation is difficult to 
explain, but it is also difficult to under- 
stand how a man who really believed 
Freemasonry to be a good thing could 
be a member of the organization for 
forty years and not attend its meetings. 

"Pray Ye Therefore the Lord of the Har- 
vest." 

If it be true that lodgism is hostile to 
Christianity and all the good things 
which grow out of and are associated 
with it, and if it be further true that the 
order grips its members so that nothing 
but the power of God can loose their 
bonds, how important it is that there 
should be much prayer for those who 
are in the slavery of secret societies. In 
fact, if spiritual disabilities could be 
seen as physical deformities can be, the 
hearts of men would be most marvelous- 
ly stirred and prayer for the deliverance 
of the captives would be much more 
earnest and continuous than it now is. 
Yet, as someone has said, a crippled soul 
is a far more pitiful object than a crip- 
pled body. A blind soul is more to be 
commiserated, than a blind body, yet we 
have asylums for the physically maimed 
and deformed, but who shall create the 
spiritual sanitarium, and if it be cre- 
ated who shall secure the incoming of 
the needy ones. There is no human cure 
for sin. The power of Jesus Christ 
alone is sufficient to do the work. We, 
therefore, have need continually to recur 
to the word of our Master: Pray ye 
therefore the Lord of the harvest that 
he will equip and send forth workers 
into his harvest. These words are not 
exact, but the thought is exact and the 
duty is plain. 

The Pocket Testament League is now 
doing a vast work for the soldiers here 
and across the sea. This little testament 
has two places for signature. Inside the 
first cover there is a pledge to carry the 
testament daily and to read it daily. In- 
side of the back cover is a pledge to ac- 
cept Jesus Christ as Saviour. These 
testaments are never given away except 
to those who sign. They are freely 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



169 



given to all who do. More than three 
hundred and sixty-five thousand soldiers 
have become members of this League in 
Great Britain. One worker, Mr. Davis, 
has secured the signatures of more than 
thirty-eight thousand soldiers to these 
covenants. The pledge and the promi- 
nence of the book stimulate the courage 
of many who would outherwise prob- 
ably be afraid. When hundreds and 
thousands of men are carrying the testa- 
ments it is easier for one who is not 
spiritually strong to do the same. 

In connection with this Pocket Testa- 
ment League there is now being organ- 
ized what is called a Home Prayer Cir- 
cle. The persons who subscribe to this 
pledge agree to take a little time every 
day to pray that the Lord will bless the 
Pocket Testament League and the sol- 
diers and sailors for whose benefit it is 
expressly designed. There will be mil- 
lions of subscribers to this covenant. It 
is well that there should be and God 
will grant his blessing on all the work. 
We ought, however, also to pray that the 
Lord will set free the thousands of cap- 
tives who, in this Christian land, have 
entered into secret obligations which are 
inconsistent with manhood, Christian 
character and loyalty to the Church of 
Jesus Christ. "He spake a parable unto 
them to this end, that men ought always 
to pray and not to faint." 



The Missionary Reviczv and the Liter- 
ary Digest have recently published state- 
ments and facts showing that an organ- 
ized campaign is being arranged for the 
destruction of Christianity. Three lines 
of attack are being followed. First, is 
the union of various infidel organizations 
for the holding of aggressive outdoor 
meetings at various busy thoroughfares 
at the noon hour. A second method is 
the free distribution of infidel literature, 
books and pamphlets by Paine, Ingersol 
and others. A third method is the or- 
ganization of ''Sabbath schools," where 
children are gathered for instruction. 
This aggressive infidelity is a challenge 
to the Church to proclaim the gospel by 
Hd and by life to the unchurched masses. 
Through the fall months street meetings 
can be held in which many may be 
reached. — United Presbyterian. 



PROFESSION VS. PRACTICE. 

The Illinois Freemason considers it 
strange that Masonic lodges, which pro- 
'fess to be institutions for the upholding 
of moral and social virtues, will carry 
upon the role of membership the names 
of drunkards, libertines and wife de- 
serters. Bearing the stamp of Masonic 
approval, they are, so far as the world 
knows, as good Masons as the balance 
of us, who are trying to behave ourselves. 
— Masonic Home Journal. 



THE FARMERS' UNION. 

One religious body that we know of 
spent considerable time at a recent con- 
ference discussing this organization. The 
Farmers' Union is a live issue in many 
antisecret churches, as the following 
correspondence indicates : 

September 4, 191 7. 

The Farmers' Educational and Co-op- 
erative Union of America is a lodge. It 
has a ritualwith password, vow, religious 
burial ceremonials, etc. 

Everything which was printed in the 
Cynosure one and two years ago, [Nov. 
and Dec. 19 15 and March and April 
1916] is still true to-day. Nothing has 
happened in the Farmers' Union in the 
meantime which could change our atti- 
tude toward it. We must warn our 
congregations not. to become members of 
this Union. 

The National Union gave permission 
in 1914, to the State Unions of Ne- 
braska and Kentucky to change or abol- 
ish their rituals according to the local 
need. Upon this the Nebraska Union 
abolished their ritual. There may be 
some Unions in Nebraska which still use 
the ritual. They do it, however, of their 
own accord. The majority of the mem- 
bers of the Farmers' Union in Nebraska 
have never seen the ritual. 

The Nebraska state Union introduced 
a motion before the last meeting of the 
National Union which is the parent or- 
o^anization, to drop the ritual from the 
National Union. But, since the abolish- 
ment of the ritual includes a change in 
the constitution, the question was re- 
ferred to the local Unions to decide if 
such a change is possible. It remains to 
be seen, at the next meeting of the Na- 
tional LInion in December, whether or 
not the National Union will keep the . 



170 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917. 



rituals. If they drop it, our fight against 
the Union will be ended, since with the 
dropping of the ritual it will be evident 
that from henceforth it is not to be 
classed with the lodges. At the present 
time the ritual of the Farmers' Union is 
practically the same as that of other 
lodges, and it is still used in many states 
but not in Nebraska and Kentucky. 

(Rev.) E. Eckhardt. 
Battle Creek, Nebraska. 



Don't let anyone be deceived when 
some people (members of the Farmers' 
Union) say that the Union no longer 
has a ritual, does not use any, and the 
like. It is true the Union does not use 
its ritual in all communities. It dis- 
penses with its use wherever and when- 
ever such action would seem to further 
their wicked cause. Where there is no 
strong opposition to secret societies and 
ritualism there they use the rituals. I 
read a letter from Mr. S. E. Davis, Na- 
tional Secy.-Treas., of Gravette, Arkan- 
sas, in which Mr. Davis says, as nearly as 
I can remember: "The Lutheran church 
is opposed to our rituals; if yours is a 
Lutheran community, I would suggest 
that you dispense with their use." That 
there is a ritual, every member at a 
local can see by referring to Article X 
of the Constitution and By-Laws. 

(Rev.) H. p. Schmidt. 

Lidderdale, la. 



In reply to an inquiry, Mr. A. C. 
Davis, Secretary-Treasurer of the F. E. 
& C. U. of A. writes: 

"\^^e made several efforts to have a 
good ritual suggested, even going so far 
as to offer a hundred dollar prize for the 
best one submitted. I am unable to say 
just what will be done with the ritual. 
In some states there is strong objection 
to the use of any work of this kind." 

A. C. Davis. 

Gravette, Arkansas. 



The Farmers' Union Ritual. 

Article X. "Section i. The ritual is 
the secret work of this Union and may 
be revised and changed at any national 
meeting without being submitted to a 
referendum vote." 

''Section 2. The ritual adopted by the 
National Union shall be used in ALL 



UNIONS throughout its jurisdiction." 
[The capitalization is ours. — Ed.] 

"Section 3. It shall be the duty of the 
Board of Directors to furnish the State 
Secretaries, at a minimum cost, the re- 
quired number of rituals, for each vState, 
from time to time, upon proper request 
being made." 

"Section 4. The ritual is the property 
of the National Union and when a char- 
ter is forfeited all rituals belonging to 
such Union must be returned to the State 
Secretaries under whose jurisdiction the 
charter was forfeited." 

"Section 5. The ritual is not to be 
sold to the membership, but furnished 
to the officers only, and when an officer 
retires he shall present the ritual to his 
successor." 

From "Constitution and By-Laws of 
the Farmers' Educational and Co-opera- 
tive Union of America, Adopted Sept. 
10, 1909." 



CANADIAN LODGES SEEK GOVERN- 
MENT CONTROL. 

A clipping from a Canadian paper in- 
forms us that : 

"A movement is being made to form 
a general merger of the various fra- 
ternal and benevolent societies of the 
Province, to issue new certificates to 
members at a definite value, and then, 
thus combined, to approach the Govern- 
ment and ask for control over the new 
organization, similar to the control ex- 
ercised by the Board of Workmen's 
Compensation. 

"A meeting was held in this city of 
representatives of a number of frater- 
nal and benevolent societies in view of 
the discoveries made recently as the re- 
sult of an investigation by special actu- 
aries employed by several of the societies 
concerned. 

"In every case the result of the in- 
vestigation has been to find that t^e state 
of the societies disclosed a very large 
deficiency on mortuary funds, sick bene- 
fit funds, and other branches. A serious 
feature of the situation is that, largely 
owing to war conditions, the societies are 
not receiving new members to any ex- 
tent, and lapses are abnormally high. 

"The actuaries in each case recom- 
mend a substantial increase on dues for 
mortuary funds. It is found that in 



October. 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



171 



many cases members of many years' 
standing are unable to meet the increased 
dues and have to quit. 

"It is believed by the representatives 
of the societies who have studied the 
matter that the only solution is to effect 
an amalgamation of all the societies, pro- 
cure actuarial reports putting a definite 
value on the certificates of all the mem- 
bers at the date of the amalgamation, 
and then make united application to the 




Government for control. It is suggested 
that in this way a new department will 
be set up similar to the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board. 

'Tt was arranged at the meeting that 
another meeting should be convened 
about the end of September to draw up 
a report to be presented to all camps and 
lodges in the district for their consid- 
eration. It is felt that Government con- 
trol will be an inducement for the vari- 
ous societies to enter the merger." 



"LODGE MEETINGS." CALLS ON 
LADY LOVE. 

Esther Fullerton, suing James H. Ful- 
lerton for divorce in district court, al- 
leges infidelity and names a Mrs. Daisy 
Munro as co-respondent. She says when 
he went to visit his 'iady-love" he fre- 
quently left home on the pretext he was 
going to attend ''lodge meetings." — 
Omaha Bee, Sept. ii, 1917. 



WHITE SHRINE OF JERUSALEM. 

White Shrine of Jerusalem organiza- 
tion was incorporated in October, 1894, 
in the County of Cook, State of Illinois. 
In May, 1897, this supreme shrine of 
the White Shrine of Jerusalem was or- 
ganized at Grand Rapids, Mich., and the 
consolidation of the Illinois and Michi- 
gan bodies was completed in August, 
1909, at Chicago. 

The theory of the order if founded 
upon the birth of Christ, its teachings are 
scriptural, and the ritual intended to 
impress upon the mind of the initiate the 
humble but glorious birth of him who 
trod the wine press of life alone. 

The mission of the order is to herald 
the glad tidings of the coming of the 
King and the world's redemption, to do 
noble deeds, and, by acts of kindness and 
words of cheer, make the world better 
and brighter to him or her, who, in the 
hour of sorrow and affliction, sees noth- 
ing but darkness. 

The Order of the White Shrine of 
Jerusalem is no part of any other order, 
but its membership is restricted to mem- 
bers of the Order of the Eastern Star 
in good standing. 

The twenty-third annual session of the 
supreme shrine of W. S. of J. will be 
held in the city of Cedar Rapids on May 
15, 16 and 17, the headquarters being 
the Montrose hotel. The sessions will 
be held in the Scottish Rite building, 
known as the Consistory building, and 
the delegates come from various parts 
of the United States and from a num- 
ber of places in Canada. The state of 
Iowa has six shrines. 

The work, teachings and principles of 
the order are of the highest character 
and membership is open to both men and 
women who are in good standing in the 
Eastern Star. — Cedar Rapids (Iowa) 
Daily Republiean, ^larch 22, 19 17. 

The White Shrine of Jerusalem is said 
to be "independent, yet loyal to every 
^lasonic body" (see Cynosure, May. 
1915, page 8). From this we may gather 
how sincere must be their teaching 
about Christ as "the world's Redeemer." 

The officers of local shrines are : 
Worthv High Priestess, Watchman of 
the Shepherds. Noble Prophetess. 
Worthy Scribe, W o r t h y Treasurer, 
Worthy Chaplain, Worthy Shepherdess, 



172 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917 



Worthy Guide, First Wise Man, Second 
Wise Man, Third Wise Man, Worthy 
Herald, King, Queen, First Hand Maid- 
en, Second Hand [this is no joke] 
IMaiden, Third Hand Maiden, Organist, 
\\'orthy Guardian and Worthy Guard. 



ODD-FELLOWS APPROPRIATE 
TRUST FUNDS. 

The Tamaqua Lodge of Odd-Fellows 
may be compelled to turn over to citi- 
zens of Tamaqua nearly $50,000 in cem- 
etery rentals, as the result of a Supreme 
Court decision. Citizens who brought 
suit against the lodge maintained that 
it held control of the principal cemetery 
of that town merely as trustees for the 
citizens under an ancient will, but that 
the funds instead have been used by the 
lodge for years for its own purposes. 

The lodge denies that it has been only 
acting as administrator for the benefit of 
the public, but the effect of the decision 
will, it is expected, compel the placing 
of all money collected from the public 
for many years into a trust fund. But 
the lodge will claim a portion of this for 
expenses in taking care of the cemetery. 
— Brotherhood, June, 1917. 



M. W. OF A. STOP "HORSE PLAY." 

From the Laws adopted at the Chi- 
cago Head Camp, June, 1917: 

''Sec. 278. Dangerous Appliances Pro- 
hibited. — Every local camp and the mem- 
bers thereof are hereby prohibited from 
using any dangerous appliances or in- 
dulging in any ceremonies while con- 
ferring the degrees or adopting a mem- 
ber, other than those prescribed in the 
ritual of this Society. If the members 
of a local camp violate this prohibition 
and use any appliances or indulge in' any 
ceremonies other than prescribed in the 
ritual of the Society, the said members 
of the local camp actually participating 
in violation of this section shall be per- 
sonally liable for any damages that may 
be recovered as the result of such use 
or indulgence." 

Sunday Picnics and Liquor. 

''Sec. 283. Sunday Picnics and Sale 

or Liquor Prohibited. — No local camp 

or members of this Society shall hold a 

Sunday picnic under the auspices of this 



Society or any local camp thereof, nor 
shall members of the Society or any local 
camp permit the sale or use of intoxicat- 
ing liquors- at any meeting of the camp 
or at any entertainment given under the 
auspices of the Modern Woodmen of 
America; nor shall intoxicating liquors 
be allowed in the camp hall or other 
premises owned, leased or controlled by 
the camp. No local camp shall be per- 
mitted to own, rent, lease or occupy as a 
place of meeting, hall or rooms directly 
connected with a saloon, bar or cafe 
where intoxicating liquors are provided." 
But suppose a camp does hold a Sun- 
day picnic or sell liquor, what then? The 
penalty for violation of this section is 
conspicuous for its absence. 



BOOTLEGGING MASONS. 

The Grand Lodge of California has a 
law against the man who retails liquor by 
the drink, but accept as a good citizen 
the one who sells it by the bottle, jug or 
barrel. — Masonic Home Journal. 

It makes good advertising and throws 
dust in the eyes of a lot of church peo- 
ple to say : "We don't accept saloon 
keepers," but the subterfuge is .exposed 
by the fact that those who make the stufif 
and bootleggers are acceptable members. 



NOT FIFTY PER CENT. MORAL. 

If the two million Masons in the 
United States lived half-way up to their 
Masonic teachings what a power for 
good the fraternity would be. — Masonic 
Chronicler. 

And this after two hundred years of 
seeking "light" ! 



Somebody said that it couldn't be done. 

But he, with a chuckle, replied 

That "maybe it couldn't," but he would 

be one 
Who wouldn't say so till he'd tried. 
So he buckled right in, with the trace of 

a grin 
On his face. If he worried, he hid it; 
He started to sing as he tackled the thing 
That couldn't be done, and he did it. 

— Selected. 



In this hand-to-hand work there have 
come to my own soul the sweetest re- 
wards of my ministry. — Goodell. 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



173 



LUTHER AND THE CONSTITUTION 
OF THE UNITED STATES. 

PROF. GEO. A. ROMOSER, CONCORDIA COL- 
LEGE, BRONXVILLE, N. Y. 

''We, the people of the United States, 
in order to form a more perfect union, 
establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quillity, provide for the common defense, 
promote the general welfare, and secure 
the blessings of liberty to ourselves and 
our posterity, do ordain and establish 




DR. MARTIN LUTHER. 

this Constitution of the United States of 
America." The noble words of this 
Preamble sound the keynote of the Con- 
stitution of the United States. The peo- 
ples who live under the egis of this in- 
strument of government are to be se- 
cured in undisturbed possession of cer- 
tain "inalienable rights," among which 
are "life, liberty, and the pursuit of hap- 
piness." And by no means the least 
precious of these prerogatives of citizen- 
ship under this fundamental law of 
government is liberty of conscience and 
freedom of worship. 

Awed at the success attained and at 
the responsibility involved, the first 
President of our country said in his in- 



augural speech at Congress in 1789: 'Tt 
would be peculiarly improper to^omit, in 
this first official act, my fervent suppli- 
cations to that Almighty Being who 
rules over the universe, who presides in 
the councils of nations, and whose provi- 
dential aids can supply every human de- 
fect, that His benediction may consecrate 
to the liberties and happiness of the peo- 
ple of the United States a government 
instituted by themselves for these es- 
sential purposes, and may enable every 
instrument employed in its administra- 
tion to execute, with success, the func- 
tions allotted to his charge. In tender- 
ing this homage to the Great Author of 
every public and private good, I assure 
myself that it expresses your senti- 
ments not less than my own, nor those 
of my fellow-citizens at large less than 
either. No people can be bound to ac- 
knowledge and adore the Invisible Hand 
which conducts the affairs of men more 
than the people of the United States. 
Every step by which they have advanced 
to the character of an independent na- 
tion seems to have been distinguished 
by some token of providential agency." 
It may be well that George Washington 
spoke far more wisely than he knew. 
The full truth is, that God's providence 
in the Reformation of the sixteenth 
century set forth the principles of lib- 
erty, the fruition of which men are en- 
joying today under the Constitution of 
the United States. Charles Dudley 
Warner is right when he says that the 
United States are today what they are 
largely because of the life of Martin 
Luther. * . 

Oppression in the Middle Ages. 
Before the sixteenth century the two 
great obstacles that lay in the way of 
political and civil liberty were a wrong 
view concerning the State and its func- 
tions and the arrogant pretensions of 
the pope. According to the prevailing 
view of government, the individual citi- 
zen counted little or nothing, while all 
emphasis was laid on the power and 
prerogatives of the state. Whatever 
attempts were made during the Middle 
Ages to change the conditions that were 
fostered by this idea of government 
failed to reach the root of the evil and 
to eliminate the pernicious idea, from 



174 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917 



the practical affairs of government, that 
the State was not for the people, but 
the people for the State. There was 
needed a reformation, or rather, a revo- 
lution, by which the mind of the com- 
mon man would be freed from the ob- 
session of prevailing conditions, and 
imbued with the w^orth and dignity and 
responsibility of the individual. Not 
until this soil and environment had been 
created could the seed of true liberty 
take root, and blossom forth into a tree 
of precious fruitage. 

As for the proud pretensions of papal 
power during the time of its supremacy, 
why clutter these pages with the debris 
of the exploded claims put forth by him 
who. in a long line of individuals, vaunt- 
ed himself as the successor of Peter, 
the Apostle of Jesus, and as the custo- 
dian of the two swords of secular and 
spiritual power? As late as 1516, in 
the year before Luther nailed the Nine- 
ty-five Theses on the door of the Wit- 
tenberg Castle church, Pope Leo X re- 
asserted the claim to universal sover- 
eignty in the bull Pastor Aeternus. His 
predecessors, of whatever name, whether 
Alexander or Boniface or Gregory, 
could claim no more, and certainly did 
claim nothing less than absolute su- 
premacy in matters of Church and in 
matters of State. 

Thus the shackles were doubly rivet- 
ed, and the power by which men's 
minds were held in the spiritual bond- 
age of dependence on the word of teach- 
ing and on the prerogative of forgive- 
ness entrusted alone to the reputed Vicar 
of Christ, was energized by the power 
to inflict, on king and subject alike, the 
pains and penalties of bodily torment. 
No prince was too exalted on his throne, 
no peasant was too lowly in the ob- 
scurity of his hovel to feel the ven- 
geance of the church that wielded the 
naked sword of power over the govern- 
ments and lives of men. In this atmos- 
phere of tyranny and stagnation the 
tree of liberty could not thrive ; and the 
tender shoots that it did, at times, put 
forth were soon blasted by the fiery 
breath of anathema and persecution. 
The Truth was not without its witness- 
es also in those days ; but the voice of 
him crying in the wilderness could not 



prevail against the hurricane of wrath 
that burst on the devoted head of any 
one who dared to protest against the 
tyranny that dominated the lives of 
men. In the unchanged course of events 
the dream of liberty could never have 
been realized as it has been realized in 
the Constitution of the United States. 
But the course of events was changed, 
and the mightiest factor, under the 
providence of God, in breaking the pow- 
er absolutism and tyranny, was the monk 
and Doctor of Divinity, Martin Luther. 

The Bible: the Charter of Liberty. 

Luther was, in the full sense of the 
word, a reformer in the domain of re- 
ligion. He protested against the false 
doctrine and pagan practice that had 
been foisted on the Church. He ap- 
pealed from pope and from councils and 
from tradition to the written Word of 
the living God. He was intent on driv- 
ing the money-changers from the Tem- 
ple, and on purging the altar of strange 
fires in order that there might be a 
place for the pure preaching of the 
Word of God and for the administra- 
tion of the uncorrupted sacraments. The 
Bible must be placed into the hands of 
the common man. It must be trans- 
lated into the language that the people 
could understand, so that each one might 
read and search and determine for him- 
self what is the will of God. There- 
fore, he must learn to read and to think, 
and to pass judgment for himself. No 
longer dare he content himself with 
taking his doctrine and beliefs ready- 
made from the hand of the priest ; he 
must give answer, and he must know 
from the authority of the inspired Rec- 
ord of Revelation what is error and 
what is truth. The responsibility for 
what man believed and what he did be- 
came personal. The common man was 
not longer merely one of a multitude, a 
pawn on the chess-board of life. There 
was awakened in him the consciousness 
of responsibility and of privilege ; and 
with it all came the yearning for the 
liberty that goes with responsibility. 
The effects were inevitable and made 
themselves felt in the sphere of the state 
and of secular life. 

Says a recent writer on this subject, 
Dr. George M. Stephenson: "Martin 



I 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



175 



Luther planted himself squarely upon 
the platform upon which Christians in 
all ages have stood — the Bible. The 
Bible is the book of humanity, and be- 
cause the Bible is the book of human- 
ity, it is the book of democracy. It fol- 
lows from this that the Bible is the 
charter of liberty — the Magna Charta 
of the world. Wherever the Bible is an 
open book, there we find religious and 
political liberty in greater or less degree. 
The apostles of liberty in all lands have 
recognized that the Bible is the most ef- 
fective of all instruments to batter- down 
the fortresses of ignorance and despot- 
ism. Recognizing this only too well, the 
commanders of the forces of despotism 
have sought to keep it out of the hands 
of the people." 

Luther on the State. 

In his "Appeal to the German No- 
bility" Luther found it necessary to 
make known, somewhat in detail, his 
teaching on the state and on temporal 
power. Emphatically does he insist that 
there is a responsibility both of rulers 
and of citizens ; that civil liberty is 
right; that civil government is to be 
viewed as a trust to be executed in the 
best interests of the governed, and that 
liberty of conscience, freedom of speech, 
and the privilege of the press are rights 
of every individual. The frequently re- 
curring statements concerning the divine 
origin of the state hay-e been misunder- 
stood by many wfiters'to have reference 
to the origin of particular states, par- 
ticular forms of government, or particu- 
lar rulers. However, the truth is that 
Luther does not designate any particu- 
lar form of civil government as being 
of divine origin. 

In the matter of religious liberty the 
statements of the reformer are so clear 
and strong that only perverseness can 
misunderstand. At a time when the 
fate of Hus was not yet forgotten, and 
when men still remembered how an em- 
peror had broken his solemn pledge of 
honor in order to surrender a heretic to 
the demands of Rome. Luther stood 
forth and proclaimed in clarion tones 
that force must not be used in matters 
of faith and religion, and that Church 
and State must remain separate and dis- 
tinct. In the espousal of these princi- 



ples Luther did not waver. Whatever 
seeming modification in practice there 
may have been is to be explained merely 
as a makeshift, made necessary, as he 
thought, by the exigencies of the times. 
But the basic principle of the separation 
of Church and State is expressed too 
clearly and vehemently in all his writ- 
ings to allow of any doubt concerning 
this fundamental doctrine. 

The Reformation, the Restorer of Political 
Freedom. 

Reviewing Luther's teaching on re- 
ligious liberty, the English statesman 
and historian James Bryce writes in his 
"Holy Roman Empire" : ''The Refor- 
mation became a revolt against the prin- 
ciple of authority in all its forms ; it 
erected the standard of civil as well as 
of religious liberty, since both of them 
are needed in a different measure for 
the development of the individual spirit. 
. . . The empire had never been con- 
spicuously the antagonist of popular 
freedom, and was, even under Charles 
the Fifth, far less formidable to the 
commonalty than were the territorial 
princes of Germany. But submission, 
and submission on the ground of inde- 
fensible transmitted right, upon the 
ground of Catholic traditions and the 
duty of the Christian magistrate to suf- 
fer heresy and schism .as little as the 
parallel sins of treason and rebellion, 
had been its constant claim and watch- 
word. Since the days of Julius Caesar 
it has passed through many phases, and 
in so far as it was a Germanic monarchy, 
it had recognized the rights of the vas- 
sals, and had admitted the delegates of 
the cities to a place in the national as- 
sembly. But these principles of the 
medieval monarchy, half feudal, half 
drawn from Teutonic antiquity, princi- 
ples themselves now decaying, had little 
to do with the religious conceptions and 
the Roman traditions on which the the- 
ory of the emj)ire rested. . . . And 
hence the direct tendency of the Refor- 
mation to narrow the province of gov- 
ernment and exalt the privileges of the 
subject was as plainly adverse to what 
one may call the imperial idea as the 
Protestant claim of the right of private 
judgment was to the pretensions of the 
papacy and the priesthood. The re- 



1/6 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917. 



mark must not be omitted in passing how 
much less than might have been expect- 
ed the religious movement did at first 
actually eli'ect in the way of promoting 
either political progress or freedom of 
conscience. The habits of. centuries 
were not to be unlearned in a few years, 
and it was natural that ideas struggling 
into existence and activity should work 
erringly and imperfectly for a time." 

A German historian, Heeren, in his 
"Historical Treatises," says of the Ref- 
ormation : "That by its influence on 
Germany, on the Netherlands, on Eng- 
land, and, for a considerable period, on 
France, it became the origin of political 
freedom in Europe, can be a matter of 
doubt, only to those who, 'having eyes, 
see not.' " And Geffchen, in "Church 
and States," writes : 'Tt remains an 
everlasting title to glory of the Refor- 
mation that political liberty first became 
possible through its principles, in a man- 
ner very difi^erent, indeed, from that of 
antiquity, wdien the civil importance of 
a small minority rested upon the dark 
background of the slavery of the masses. 
The principles of liberty of conscience 
and of universal priesthood, which make 
man inwardly free, lead also involuntar- 
ily to outward liberty. A people who no 
longer feel themselves in the position of 
an obedient and submissive laity, at the 
service of a privileged clergy, will refuse 
to continue any longer in a state of pas- 
sive obedience to the government with- 
out any rights of their own." Tersely 
does the French and Roman Catholic 
historian Michelet express his opinion 
in his "Life of Martin Luther" in these 
words : 'Tt is not incorrect to say that 
Luther is the restorer of liberty in mod- 
ern times." 

Highest Expansion of the Principles of 
Liberty — The Constitution. 

The principles of government and of 
liberty which the great Reformer pro- 
mulgated so clearly have found their 
highest expression in the Constitution 
of the L^nited States. We look in vain 
elsewhere for the same emphatic and 
cleancut avowal of these principles. Cer- 
tainly the French revolution did not es- 
pouse these principles. The French 
revolution was not a revolt against ab- 
solutism, nor was it a defense of the 



rights of the individual. It made mere- 
ly a transfer of absolutism from one de- 
pository to another; and instead of de- 
fending the rights of the individual it 
asserted the authority of the mass. All 
the power formerly possessed by the 
king was taken over by the people, un- 
diminished in amount, and untempered 
in quality. The only substantial change 
consisted in the substitution of the abso- 
lute power of the people for the abso- 
lute power of the prince; and this power 
vaunted itself even in the sphere of the 
spiritual. But the Constitution of the 
United States stands unequivocally 
against absolutism in every form, for 
the rights of the individual, and for the 
separation of Church and State. 

If, then, the legend on the Liberty 
Bell, "to proclaim liberty throughout the 
land unto all the inhabitants thereof," 
has been realized ; if the two principles 
of liberty, the enfranchisement of the 
individual and the separation of the 
Church and State, form the keystone of 
the Constitution of the United States, 
then we must turn to the Monk of Wit- 
tenberg to find the mighty agent through 
whom God brought anew these blessings 
of liberty to the sons of men. Loyal 
American citizens have every reason to 
join a civic celebration [October 31, 
19 1 7] of the four hundredth anniver- 
sary of the Reformation wrought 
through Martin Luther. — From "Four 
Hundred Years," Concordia Publishing 
House, St. Louis, Mo. 



THE SONG OF THE UMBRELLA. 

D 
r 
i 

P. 

drip. 

drip! The 

rainy days 

have come, and 

me you'd better 

• • always take, When- 

. ■ ever you leave home. 

For when the sun is 

shining bright, And down 



trip, 



A 



the sti-eet you 

little shower may come up, 

D 

r 

i 



I 



Drip! 
-Maggie Wheeler Ross, 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



177 



UNIONIZING THE PUBLIC SERVICE. 

It is difficult to believe that President 
Wilson approves the organization of 
unions among federal employes and the 
affiliation of these unions with the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. We are sur- 
prised indeed that Mr. Goippers favors 
it. The Tribune believes in collective 
bargaining and in the organization of 
labor. The evils of unionism lie in the 
abuse of unionism, as the evils of popu- 
lar government lie in its abuse. But there 
should be a sharp line drawn between 
public service and the industrial relations 
of private citizens. There is a special 
duty assumed by men and women who 
voluntarily enter public service. It is a 
duty superior to private interest and if 
any one is not willing to recognize this 
he should not be accepted in the service. 

In the case of a private employe his 
right to strike is recognized. In the case 
of a public employe no such right should 
be recognized. Collective action by gov- 
ernment employes to enforce economic 
advantage is an equivalent to mutiny on 
shipboard or in the army. The greater 
interest of the general public must over- 
rule the private interest, otherwise gov- 
ernment ceases to be free and responsible 
and becomes a haphazard affair which 
may be made subservient at any moment 
to a private interest at the cost of the 
public welfare. Affiliated with the Fed- 
eration of Labor, all these unionized gov- 
ernment employes will carry their gov- 
ernment responsibilities into the midst of 
the industrial struggle, where it has no 
business to be. Strikes to raise the pay 
or shorten the hours of workmen in the 
clothing trade or the coal mines or the 
steel trade might involve the government 



unions and precipitate a collapse of pub- 
lice machinery. The supremacy of gov- 
ernment necessary to all ordered society 
would be lost and we should have a con- 
dition of affairs like that of Russia in her 
present chaos. 

The unwisdom of this departure, from 
the viewpoint of legitimate trade union- 
ism, seems to us as clear as its unwisdom 
from the viewpoint of responsible gov- 
ernment. If public employes organize and 
adopt union tactics to the demoralization 
of government functions there will be a 
sharp curtailment of the right to strike, 
compulsion to arbitrate, and other de- 
vices to protect the public from being a 
helpless victim of private exploitation. 
The American people as a whole w^ill 
protect its government from reduction to 
anarchy and will enforce whatever 
checks are needed to this end. But meas- 
ures of this nature are very likely to re- 
flect their influence upon general legisla- 
tion and a few experiences with public 
disorganization will bring a reaction 
which will not be beneficial to the organ- 
ized labor movement. 

Trade unions have no place in the 
public service. 

—Editorial, Chicago Tribune, 
Sept. 19, 1917. 



There are blessings which we cannot 
obtain if we cannot accept and endure 
suffering. There are joys which can 
come to us only through sorrow. There 
are revealings of divine truth which we 
can get only when earth's lights have 
gone out. There are harvests which can 
o^row onl\- after the ploughshare has done 
its rough work.— J. R. AIilt.er, D. D. 



Four Hundred Years 

Commemorative Essays on' the Reformation of 
Dr. Martin Luther and Its Blessed Results 

IN THE YEAR OF THE 
FOUR-HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE REFORMATION 

By Various Lutheran Writers 
Retail Trice $1.10, Postpaid. 

We recommend this hook to pastors and heads of families as not only one of the latest, but 
one of the best accounts of Martin Luther and the Reformation. Though published in 1917, 
the second edition is already off from the press, and over fifteen thousand copies in all have 



been sold. 



Address: NAT'L CHRISTIAN ASSN., 850 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



178 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917. 



3l0l|n (f mnrg Aliams — i^ixtl) Prpsibpttt Mnttf Ji i^tatf s 



[We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Air. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

Ouincy, 20 August, 1832. 
To AA'illiam L. Stone, Esq. 

Dear Sir : Long, and, I fear, tedious, 
as you have found my last letter, I was 
compelled by a reluctance at making it 
longer, to compress the observations in it 
upon the intrinsic nature of the Masonic 
oaths, obligations and penalties within a 
compass insufficient to disclose my opin- 
ion, and the reasons upon which it is 
founded. 

I had said to you that the institution 
of Freemasonry was vicious, in its first 
step, the initiation oath, obligation and 
penalty of the Entered Apprentice. To 
sustain this opinion, I assigned to you 
five reasons. Because they were : 

1. Contrary to the laws of the land, 
extrajudicially taken and administered. 

2. In violation of the positive precept 
of Jesus Christ. 

3. A pledge to keep undefined secrets, 
the swearer being ignorant of their na- 
ture. 

4. A pledge to the penalty of death for 
violation of the oath. 

5. A pledge to a mode of death — cruel, 
unusual, unfit for utterance from human 
lips. 

If, in the statement of these five ob- 
jections, upon principles of law, re- 
ligion, and morals, there be anything un- 
sound, I invite you to point it out. But 
if you contest either of my positions, I 
must entreat you not to travel out of the 
record. 

I might ask you not to consider it a 
refutation of either of these reasons, to 
say that you and all other honest and 
honorable Masons have never so under- 
stood or practiced upon this oath, obliga- 
tion and penalty. The inquiry is not 
what vou practice, or that of others has 
been, but what is the obligation, its oath, 
and its penalty. 

I must request of you to give me no 



explanation of this oath, obligation and 
penalty, directly contrary to their un- 
equivocal import — that you will not ex- 
plain black by saying that it means white, 
or even by alleging that you so under- 
stand it. I particularly beg not to be told 
that honorable, intelligent and virtuous 
men — George Washington and Joseph 
Warren of example — understood that the 
penalty of death for treachery meant the 
death of martyrdom for fidelity. 

I would willingly be spared the neces- 
sity of replying to the averment that the 
patterns of honor and virtue whom I 
have just named, with a long catalogue 
of such men, have taken this oath, and 
bound themselves to this obligation, un- 
der this penalty ; for I might deem it 
proper to inquire whether the very act 
of binding such men, by such oath, to 
such obligation, under such penalty, is 
not among the sins of the institution. 

I must ask you to suppose that such 
institution had never existed — that it 
were now to be formed, and that you 
were one of ten or twenty virtuous and 
intelligent men about to found a char- 
itable and convivial secret association. 
Suppose a committee of such a meeting 
appointed to draw up a constitution for 
the society should report the Entered 
Apprentice's oath, obligation and pen- 
alty, as a form of initiation for the ad- 
mission of members. I do not ask you 
whether you would vote for the ac- 
ceptance of the report ; but what would 
you think of the reporters? 

I consider this as the true and only 
test of the inherent and essential char- 
acter of Masonry, and it was under this 
conviction that I told you that the En- 
tered Apprentice's oath was sufficient to 
settle, in my mind, the immoral charac- 
ter of the institution. 

It is, perhaps, too much to ask of you 
an explicit assent to these positions, be- 
cause you may consider it an acknowl- 
edgment of error. But this is the first 
and fundamental consideration, from 
which I draw the conclusion that Ma- 
sonry ought forever to be abolished. It 
is wrons: — es'^entially wrong — a seed of 
evil which can never produce any good. 
It may perish in the ground — it may nev- 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



179 



er rise to bear fruit ; but whatever fruit 
it does bear must be rank poison ; it can 
never prove a blessing but by its bar- 
renness. 

My objections to this seminal principle 
of Masonry apply, in all their force, to 
the single obligation, the form of which 
is given in the apendix to your volume 
(page 3), where it is stated to have been 
the only obligation, taken for all three 
degrees, so late as 1730, when only three 
degrees of Masonry were known. The 
oath is in fewer words, but more com- 
prehensive ; for the obligation is to keep 
"the secrets or secrecy of Masons or 
Masonry." There is indeed a qualifica- 
tion in the promise not to write, print, 
mark, etc., which seems to keep the 
obligations within the verge of the law. 
For the promise is to reveal nothing 
whereby the secret might be unlawfully 
obtained. The penalty is also death, not 
for constancy, but for treachery, ''so that 
there shall be no remembrance of me 
among ^lasons." 

The oath, obligation, and penalty, the 
only one taken in all the degrees of 
Alasonry known but one century ago, is 
the prolific parent of all the degrees, and 
all the oaths, obligations and penalties 
since invented, and of the whole progeny 
of crimes descended from them. The 
natural and unavoidable tendency of 
such an obligation is the multiplication 
of its kind. This tendency is among the 
most obvious causes w^hich have led to 
the interdiction of all such oaths and 
obligations, by the civil, and ecclesiastical 
and the moral law. The obligation is 
to keep undefined secrets. As they are 
undefined in the obligation itself, there 
is nothing in the constitutions of Ma- 
sonry to define them, or to secure uni- 
formity either of the secrets or of the 
obligations. Every lodge may vary the 
secrets, obligations and penalties ; and. 
accordingly, they have been so varied 
that scarcely any two adhering Masons 
o^ive the same account of them. Almost 
the only defence of Masonry, after the 
publication of the books of David Ber- 
nard and Averv Allyn, consisted in ef- 
forts to discredit them, by denying that 
the oaths, obligations and penalties were 
truly stated by them. A secret institu- 
tion in three degrees, the secret of each 



degree being withheld from the members 
of the degrees inferior to it, is a per- 
petual temptation to the ^initiated to 
multiply the secrets and the degrees. 
Thus it is that the lodges have grown 
into chapters, the chapters into encamp- 
ments, the encampments into consis- 
tories, and, so long ago as December, 
1802, the grand inspectors of the United 
States of America issued, at Charleston, 
South Carolina, a circular announcing 
the existence and names of the thirty- 
three degrees of ]Masonry. 

(To be continued.) 



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Mail addressed to members of the 
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the name and address of the sender, and 
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is as follows : 



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Stamp 



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180 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917 



Heyday of Unionism. 



Clippings from the Daily Press. 



Women Demand Voice on War Boards. 

Chicago, Sept. 10. — There should be at least 
one woman on every governmental or semi- 
governmental war committee, members of the 
\\'omen's Trade Union League of Chicago ar- 
gued yesterda}- at one of that organization's 
regular meetings. Representations backing up 
the contention will be made to the govern- 
ment through organized labor channels, it was 
stated by Miss Agnes Nestor, president of the 
league. 

"It is essential to the interests of the present 
women workers of this country as well as 
to those women who will take the places of sol- 
diers that the}' be represented on defense coun- 
cils and other committees,"' said Miss Nestor. 
"The women representatives should be active 
in the labor movement and carry out the 
league's principles that women who are in 
great need of employment should b^ the first 
selected to fill vacancies, and that they should 
receive the men's wages." 

"Closed Shop" Fights in War Time. 
[Editorial, Chicago Daily Nezvs, Aug. 15, 1917] 

Demands of workingmen for higher wages 
and better conditions of labor should be given 
careful consideration at all times. But the 
present is no time for disturbances in indus- 
try through strikes in support of the "closed 
shop" principle. Not only is this true of all 
branches of production on which depends na- 
tional efiiciency, but it is particularly true of 
service by public utilities, since its cessation 
produces widespread interference with busi- 
ness of many sorts. 

In Springfield, 111., street railway employes 
W'ho have been on strike for a considerable 
period are reported to insist upon "the closed 
shop or nothing." The controversy has already 
resulted in such disturbance of the peace that 
intervention of state troops has become nec- 
essary. In other cities of the country in which 
street railway employes are either engaged in 
strikes or are threatening to stop work, the 
demand for the "closed shop'' constitutes one 
of the issues. 

The country cannot afford in this crisis to 
deal with disputed questions between employ- 
ers and trade unions which are fundamental 
in their nature and are hard to settle at any 
time. The fact that workers in Springfield 
and elsewhere tie up industry in efforts to 
benefit their trade unions, though by striking 
they weaken the nation while it is menaced 
by a powerful foreign enemy, demonstrates the 
necessity of legislation by Congress substitut- 
ing compulsory arbitration for strikes in all 
vital industries throughout the period of the 
war. 

Public opinion and the public authorities 
should co-operate to secure justice for all 
workers as a necessary element of national effi- 
ciency. No less essential is it that those who 
promote strife in industry over issues that do 



not call for settlement while the war is in 
progress, even if they ever can be settled, shall 
be effectually restrained. 

Killed in Packing House Strike Riot. 

Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 12. — A riot in which 
it is estimated more than 2,000 striking pack- 
ing house employes and their sympathizers par- 
ticipated took place tonight at Armour & Co.'s 
plant in Kansas City, Kan. Ora Wood, a 
switchman, was fatally injured and two others 
were sent to hospitals after a battle with 
bricks. 

The trouble was the first of a serious na- 
ture in the packing house strike, which has 
been in progress almost a week. 

Late today a number of employes of the 
Loose-Wiles Biscuit Company walked out. 
Order Seattle Ship Strike. 

Seattle, Wash., Sept. 13. — A strike of more 
than 5,000 union shipwrights and joiners and 
shipyard laborers has been ordered to begin 
in Seattle shipyards tomorrow morning, to 
enforce a boycott declared Sept. 1 by the Seat- 
tle Central Labor Council, the Seattle Building 
Trades Council, and the Seattle District Coun- 
cil of Carpenters against lumber turned out by 
mills operating on a ten-hour workday basis. 
Serving Two Masters. 

Washington, D. C, Sept. 12. — Nation-wide 
demands of the coal miners for wage increases 
are rising to complicate the problems of the 
coal administration and the situation is a diffi- 
cult one to solve. 

Recognizing the necessity of holding labor 
in contentment in order to stimulate produc- 
tion, which is one of the essential demands of 
the hour, H. A. Garfield, director of the coal 
administration, has asked John P. White, pres- 
ident of the United Mine Workers of Amer- 
ica, to co-operate with him in reaching a solu- 
tion of the wage question. 

Representatives of tne mine workers are in 
Washington in preliminary conferences with 
White, who is serving in two capacities, one 
as president of the union men who are de- 
manding more money and the other as adviser 
to the government and Mr. Garfield as an ex- 
pert on labor problems of the mine. 
Fatally Shot in 'Frisco Riot. 

San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 12.— A substitute 
car man was probably fatally shot and several 
other men were severely injured late today in 
the strike of a majority of the platform em- 
ployes of the United Railroads here. The sub- 
stitute crews were beaten. 

It became known tonight that the executive 
board of the San Francisco Labor Council has 
discussed a proposal for a general sympathetic 
strike of all workers in the city. 

24,000 Out in 'Frisco. 

San Francsico, Cal., Sept. 17.— More than 
$150,000,000 worth of government contracts for 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



181 



ships and engines are affected by the walkout 
of about 24,0{)0 workmen. More than 100 man- 
ufacturing plants in this and nearby cities are 
involved. 

At first only a few shipyards and a few large 
machine shops were involved, but the trouble 
has spread to many industries and to the street 
car lines. 

There has been some violence and this was 
repeated late today, when street car windows 
were broken and several substitute carmen 
were hurt, resulting in fourteen arrests. 
Wooden Shipyards Hit. 

Portland, Ore., Sept. 17. — Partial cessation 
of work in wooden shipyards on the Willa- 
mette and Columbia rivers at Vancouver, 
Wash., St. Helens, Ore., and Astoria, Ore,, 
was reported today as a result of the strike of 
approximately 2,000 union men on Saturday, 
for the closed shop. 

Protest Airplane Spruce. 

Portland, Ore., Sept. 18.— Col. C. E. Dentler, 
United States army, announced here today he 
would send a special train load of troops to 
Astoria, Ore., tonight; to prevent Industrial 
Workers of the World from endeavoring to 
coerce employes of the Hammond lumber mill 
there to strike in sympathy with Seattle strik- 
ers against ten-hour lumber. The Hammond 
mill is w^orking on airplane spruce. About 
100 men struck at Astoria today. Hindus are 
among the I. W. W. pickets. 

6,000 Longshoremen Out. 

New York, Sept. 19. — The longshoremen's 
walkout on the Chelsea piers, which was 
caused by the refusal of the International Mer- 
cantile Marine Company to discharge a fore- 
man who dismissed a man who, when ill, asked 
permission to get whisky, spread along the 
North River today until approximately 6,000 
men had refused to work. Their action re- 
sulted in stopping the loading of sixty-seven 
vessels under allied flags, the strikers con- 
tended. 

Camp Logan Strike Ended. 

Houston, Tex., Sept. 18.— The strike of 700 
union carpenters engaged in government con- 
struction work at Camp Logan and the avia- 
tion camp was brought to an end this after- 
noon after a conference between Capt. Roth- 
rock, camp quartermaster; S. B. Houx, presi- 
dent of the American Construction Company, 
and a representative of the local carpenters' 
union. The men went out because other than 
union men were employed. 

U. S. May Share Wage Raise. 

Washington, D. C, Sept. 19. — The govern- 
ment opened a way for possible settlement of 
strikes in Pacific Coast shipyards today by 
offering to pay half of any wage increases for 
companies" making not more than 10 per cent 
profit on commandeered ships. 

San Francisco builders in whose plants a 
strike of iron workers is in progress, tying up 
$150,000,000 worth of government work, agreed 
to consider the workers' demands for more 
pay on the shipping board's cost-sharing pro- 
posal, and prospects for settling the strike 
were reported bright. 



Tie Up New Orleans Shipping. 

New Orleans, Sept. 19. — Shipping at this 
port was virtually tied up this afternoon when 
approximately 2,100 longshoremen, both white 
and Negroes, struck after the employing steve- 
dores refused to sign a new contract at in- 
creased wages for a term of five years. 
12,000 Shoemakers Return. 

Lynn, Mass., Sept. 19.— Twenty shoe fac- 
tories, employing 12,000 workers, closed since 
April 18, will reopen on Monday morning as 
the result of an agreement reached late today 
at a conference between representatives of the 
unions and the manufacturers. 

Mine Owners Refuse to Arbitrate. 

Phoenix, Ariz., Sept. 18. — Managers of the 
mines of the Arizona Copper Company, Shan- 
non Copper Company and Phelps-Dpdge Cor- 
poration, in the Clifton-Morenci district, filed 
today with Gov. Thomas E. Campbell their an- 
swer to the citizens' committee of Clifton, 
which they met yesterday at the request of the 
governor. 

The citizens' committee requested the mine 
managers to consent to an arbitration of the 
differences, looking to a termination of the 
strike, which has kept the mines idle for some 
time and has kept 5,800 men out of work for 
several months. 

In their reply the mine managers say it is 
impossible for them to treat with the miners 
or accept arbitration, which, "in view of past 
experience, would be binding on the mining 
companies only." 

Strike Ordered on Three Railroads. 

Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 9. — A strike order 
issued here late today calls upon 7,000 freight 
handlers and checking clerks of the Rock Is- 
land, Missouri, Kansas & Texas and Missouri 
Pacific railroads to quit work tomorrow. 

Women Boxmakers Strike. 

New York, Aug. 30. — Because their demands 
for a forty-eight-hour w^eek, 20 per cent in- 
crease in wages and abolition of "cellar shops'' 
were ignored, 1,200 women members of the 
paper box w^orkers' union at a meeting tonight 
ordered a general strike in Manhattan to go 
into effect tomorrow morning. Ofificials of the 
union asserted that 10,000 women and 800 men 
drivers will be affected by the order. 
Seven Bomb Outrages Laid to Labor Thug. 

Chicago, Sept. 10. — Thomas Asciuto. who 
alone of the Winslow^- Brothers pay roll bandits 
has escaped arrest, was connected definitely by 
the police yesterday with seven dynamite 
bomb explosions which have wrecked buildings 
in Chicago in recent labor troubles. 

Charles Carrao, one of the robbers under 
arrest, is alleged to have been concerned in a: 
least one of these outrages. 

The explosions attrilnited to Asciuto were : 

J. W. Barnhart's barber shop at 108 North 
Dearborn street, June 28 ; bomb placed in front 
door in the early evening while the shop was 
filled with customers ; front of shop blown out. 

Barber shop at 141 North Western avenue, 
June 28. 

Barber shop at 1410 West Chicago avenue, 
June 28. 

Barber shop at 803 Wells street, June 28. 



182 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917 



Barber sbop at 1414 West Chicago avenue, 
June 28. 

Residence of Jacob von Heuben, 1537 Glen- 
lake avenue, July 12. Von Heuben is the pro- 
prietor of the Great Northern Hotel barber 
shop. 

Bismarck Hotel, July 20 ; bomb placed in the 
door of the Berlin room in Fifth avenue. 

Asciuto has been business agent of the bar- 
bers' union. Carrao also has been connected 
with this organization. Carrao formerly owned 
a barber shop in Halsted street, which he sold 
to Asciuto. 

The bomb explosions cited were incidents 
of the war waged by the union barbers upon 
shops which refused to employ union labor 
only. 

Before the Von Heuben explosion a man 
who answered Asciuto's description engaged 
a room at the Great Northern Hotel. He left 
a stink bomb in the room when he checked 
out in the morning. This was his compli- 
ment to the hotel for housing Von Heuben's 
shop. 

In all the explosions credited to Asciuto he 
used an automobile in making his escape. 
This accounts for the five explosions he is 
said to have perpetrated on the same night. 
Prisoners Howl as Boml) Blast Shakes Jail. 

Prisoners in the county jail howled in ter- 
ror last night when a bomb was exploded 
within a half-block of the prison. So terrific 
was the detonation that for a time it was be- 
lieved the jail itself had been attacked. 

The explosion occurred in the rear of 24 
West Austin avenue, a building occupied by 
Morkrum & Co., manufacturers of telegraphic 
supplies. The concern is just now employed 
in fulfilling contracts with the government 
for war supplies. It is believed the bomb was 
exploded as the result of labor troubles, a 
strike having been in progress at the plant for 
some weeks. 
Hurl Bomb Over Bismarck Garden Wall. 

Chicago, Aug. 23.— The 7 o'clock whistles 
had just blown when an automobile carrying 
two men slowed up at 631 Bradley place. One 
of them hurled a round, black object over 
the Bismarck Garden palisade. The automo- 
bile sped away. A few seconds later there 
was an explosion that wrecked the southeast 
corner of the garden, shook buildings and 
shivered windows for a radius of several 
blocks. 

Max Eitel of the firm of Eitel Brothers, 
owners of the garden, who lives at 824 Brad- 
ley place, and also his brother Karl, believe 
the bomb throwing was the result of the sev- 
eral weeks old waiters' strike. 

Painters' Agent Shot. 

Chicago, Aug. 22.— Roy (Muckles) Shields, 
veteran of many revolver battles in Chicago 
labor feuds, was shot twice yesterday after- 
noon in a dispute in front of a building being 
constructed at 6746 Bennett avenue. 

James J. Casey, who did the shooting, and 
Edward Tyrrell, a witness, were locked up 
at the Woodlawn police station. 

Shields said he was business agent for the 
painters' union. Casey and Tyrrell, accord- 



ing to the police report, were employed at the 
building as watchmen. Shields entered the 
building about 3 o'clock, Casey said, and or- 
dered several union painters to quit work, 
saying some of the other painters were not 
union men. 

"Shields drew a gun and Tyrrell and I tried 
to disarm him," said Casey. "He pointed it 
at me and then I shot him. He would have 
shot me if I hadn't." 

Drive to Unionize Stockyards. 

Chicago, Sept. 10. — An organized labor 
"drive'' on the stockyards yesterday resulted 
in hundreds of workers in packing plants 
signing applications for membership in the 
unions affiliated with the Stockyards Labor 
Council, according to statements made last 
night by heads of the organization. 

The "drive" was held in Columbian Hall, 
Forty-eighth and Paulina streets, and was at- 
tended by more than 1,500 workers, the num- 
ber necessitating an overflow meeting in ^ 
cold drizzle outside the hall. 

John Fitzpatrick, president of the Chicago 
Federation of Labor, was chairman and chief 
speaker at the meeting. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick made an appeal to Negro 
workers at the yards, declaring their cause 
was common with that of white workers — "to 
deal with the bosses as we do." 
Negroes Refuse to Join Stockyards Union. 

Chicago, Sept. 14. — About 100 Negro em- 
ployes of the stockyards, members of the 
American Negro Protective League, refused 
last night to be unionized. They hooted M. 
Sims, Negro organizer of the Chicago Fed- 
eration of Labor, from the platform when he 
urged them to join the union and unanimously 
voted against such action. The meeting was 
held at 3458 Forest avenue. R. E. Barker 
presided and A. L. Jackson was secretary. 

The American Negro Protective League 
was formed five years ago and has about 2,000 
members. Its purpose, it was explained, is 
"to look out for the best interests of its 
membership." 

Bayonets End Springfield Riot. 

Springfield, III., Sept. 3.— The rioting was 
started by 1,200 laboring men, who had re- 
turned from Bloomington, where a Labor Day 
celebration was held. The Bloomington af- 
fair was marred when their chief speaker, 
Frank Comerford of Chicago, declined to 
address them. 

Comerford refused a demand of a com- 
mittee of labor men that he omit from his 
speech all mention of the war. 

The patriotic defiance of the Chicago law- 
yer made the Springfield labor men angry, and 
many of them were still in an ugly mood 
when they reached here. 

As the crowd stepped from a Chicago & 
Alton train they spied a street car two blocks 
away. They rushed to it, attacked the motor- 
man and conductor, and ordered all passen- 
gers to get off. An instant later a car came 
from the west and the crew was ordered to 
get off. Rioters turned on the power in the 
two cars and sent them crashing into one an- 
other head on. In less than five minutes five 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



183 



cars had been demoHshed. The wrecking of 
other cars quickly followed. 

Troops from the Ninth and Tenth regi- 
ments of home guard militia, recently organ- 
ized, which are stationed at the state arsenal 
and at Camp Lincoln, tried to curb the riot- 
ers. Reinforcements were called for. 

The mob marched to the St. Nicholas Hotel 
in search of General Manager Mackie. Fail- 
ing to find him there, they marched to the 
offices of the Utilities company. 

Six soldiers on guard at the building held 
the crowd in check for some time, but bolder 
ones in the mob finally started hurling bricks 
at the plate glass windows, riddling the front 
of the building. 

Suddenly the reinforcements appeared. 
They caught the mob unawares and as the 
soldiers charged down on them at double 
quick, using their bayonets and the butts of 
their guns, the rioters fled in confusion. A 
few of them tried to resist. They were 
clubbed and trampled upon by the troopers. 
One man w^as severely bayoneted in the arm. 

A heavy rain began to fall. It dampened 
the ardor of the rioters and a majority of 
them quickly quit the business section. 

Twenty arrests have been made so far by 
the sheriff's forces and by the soldiers. The 
police have been inactive during the trouble, 
and were only in evidence after the soldiers 
had stopped the attack on the utilities office 
building. 

Troops Stop Union Parade. 

Springfield, 111., Sept. 9. — Two men were 
shot and several others were bruised and cut 
here this afternoon w^hen troops of the Ninth 
Illinois Infantry broke up a parade of labor 
unionists intended as a demonstration in sup- 
port of the street car strike, which has been 
in progress for seven weeks. Neither of those 
shot was seriously wounded. The parade had 
been forbidden by police authorities as a 
precaution against disturbances by car strike 
sympathizers. 

The parade and demonstration this after- 
noon was to have started from a hall down- 
town. Soldiers were stationed at the assem- 
bly place shortly after noon and the union 
men were refused admittance. The men then 
succeeded in forming in line farther north. 
Intercepted by the police when half the line 
had passed, the portion barred went up an 
alley, and ioined the others beyond. 

It was here that the clash between the 
paraders and troops took place. 
No Parade, No Coal. 

Springfield, 111., Sept. 10.— With the tem- 
perature at fifty and few Springfield cellars 
supplied with coal, the miners of the district 
refused to go to work this morning, throwing 
the mines into idleness as a protest against 
the action of the authorities in breaking up 
Sunday's strike parades. Seventeen mines, 
emploving more than 3,000 men, were idle this 
morning. 

Leaders of the movement said that there 
would be no coal mined here until the au- 
thorities permitted the parade which was 
broken up Sunday. 



That the proposed parade will yet be held 
is probable. Sheriff Wheeler stated this morn- 
ing that the authorities had no objections to 
a local parade, provided a permit was se- 
cured. 

Washington, D. C, Sept. 10. — Frank Far- 
rington, president of the United Mine Work- 
ers of Illinois, ordered the striking miners 
near Springfield today to return to work. Mr. 
Farrington arrived in Washington to partici-. 
pate in conferences l)etween operators, mine 
workers and Fuel Administrator Harry A. 
Garfield. 

He declared the action of the miners un- 
justified in quitting work because state troops 
broke up yesterday's parade. 

Strikers Berate Judges and Soldiers. 

Springfield, 111., Sept. Ki. — Three thousand 
laboring men and women, including the strik- 
ing street car men, marched through the 
streets of Springfield this afternoon, winding 
up with a demonstration at Lincoln Park. 

At the park fiery speeches were made at- 
tacking Judge E. S. Smith, w^ho issued the 
strike injunction against the street car men, 
Federal Judge J. Otis Humphrey, Mayor 
Baumann and Commissioner Reece of Spring- 
field, Sheriff Wheeler and the Illinois National 
Guard. Before the meeting ended, however, 
resolution that the general strike in sympa- 
thy with the street car operatives be called off 
and that work shall be resumed in all the 
factories, mines and shops tomorrow morning 
were adopted. 

In accordance with the peace agreement 
reached yesterday afternoon between the 
strikers and the business men, the special dep- 
uties that have been employed by Sheriff 
Wheeler were dismissed last night. If depu- 
ties are required, the agreement provides that 
they shall come from the ranks of the busi-- 
ness men and the labor leaders, w'ho will vol- 
unteer for this service as an evidence that 
Springfield can maintain law and order on the 
city's own responsibility. 

At the park. Judge Smith was referred to 
as a "whiskered animal'' and denounced re- 
peatedly. "We paid no attention to his in- 
junction and don't propose to," one speaker 
said. "Injunction Judge Humphrey" was the 
term applied to the federal judge. "Gunmen 
in uniform"' was what was said about the 
national guard. The Springfield municipal 
officers under the labor fire were pictured as 
political tools of the corporate interests, as 
was Sheriff Wheeler. 

The charge that the strike had been insti- 
gated by pro-German interests was vigorously 
repudiated by the speakers. 

Labor Urzes Unstinted Loyalty. 

Minneapolis. Minn., Sept. (3. — Organized la- 
bor leaders, Socialists, radicals — the men and 
women who make up the American Alliance 
for Labor and Democracy — determined today 
to stand squarely and firmly behind President 
A\'ilson and the United States government in 
the prosecution of the war against Germany. 

An appeal to organized labor to ior'^•'^ 
branches of the alliance in every cit\- and 
hamlet to stamp out pro-Germanism and to 



184 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917. 



give the government unstinted loyalty was 
adopted unanimously by the convention. 

I. W. W. Code Book Found. 

Chicago, Sept. 7. — It became known yester- 
day that government officials, in the raid on 
the home of William D. Haywood, secretary 
and "father" of the I. W. W., discovered a 
"black bag.'' which is reported to have given 
up a code book and other valuable evidence, 
"Knowledge of the existence of this black 
bag had reached the officials beforehand. 

Detectives who have been on the trail of 
the I. W. W. officials in Chicago had re- 
ported it to headquarters. More than this, 
the}' had trailed it to the home of Haywood. 
So when a search of the home failed to re- 
veal it they searched again. 

Finally it was found, carefully hidden, and 
very likely would have been overlooked had 
not its existence been known in advance. 
With this code book, it is understood, tele- 
grams and letters can be deciphered. It is 
probably a fact that this is the most valuable 
"catch" in the whole government net. 

Government officials hope, through its use, 
to fasten the guilt for the era of sabotage 
threatened throughout the West which is 
believed to have as its aim the firing of for- 
ests and wheat fields, the burning of lumber 
mills and the wrecking of machinery. 
The I. W. W. in Russia. 

Chicago, Sent. 7. — Correspondence seized in 
the office of "Big Bill" Haywood, general sec- 
retary-treasurer of the I. W. W., showed the 
agents of the Department of Justice the inter- 
national character of the organization. 

Innumerable letters were found telling of 
the activities of the organization in Russia 
and Australia. Progress in Russia, according 
to the letters, has been especially good since 
the revolution against the monarchy. A daily 
paper has been started at Petrograd and an- 
other is contemplated at Moscow. Much of 
the correspondence is in code, and it will take 
some time for its full significance to be re- 
vealed. 

Pay, Pay, Pay. 
The magnates meet together and they talk, 

talk, talk; 
The labor unions grumble and then balk, balk, 

balk. 
And the people of the city have to walk, walk, 

walk. 
The lawyers of both factions have their say 

say, say ; 
When they talk of arbitration it is nay, nay, 

nay, 
And the overburdened public has to pay, pay, 
pay. — New- York Herald. 



lEittflmL 



The deliverance of the soul from all 
useless and unquiet cares brings to it an 
unspeakable peace and freedom ; this is 
true simplicity. This state of entire res- 
iijnation and perpetual acquiescence pro- 
duces true liberty, and this liberty brings 
perfect simplicity. — Fenelon. 



DISHONEST STRATEGICS. 

As an example of the dishonest way 
the lodge fights its battles, it is only neces- 
sary to scrutinize their attack on the 
War Department because of its exclu- 
sion of lodge clubhouses from the army 
field camps. 

By referring to an article, "Govern- 
ment Bars Lodge Clubhouses," found 
elsewhere in this number of the Cyno- 
sure, it will be seen that the government 
will allow houses to be erected by the 
Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus, and 
Young Men's Hebrew Association, to 
take care of the Protestant, Catholic, and 
Jewish soldiers. 

In their fight against the War Depart- 
ment's ruling the lodge papers omit all 
mention of the Young Men's Hebrew 
Association. This is done to make it 
appear that the Knights of Columbus 
have been given privileges because of 
political favoritism. A large measure 
of what the lodge press says against the 
War Department's ruling would fall flat 
if the whole truth were told. We hold 
no brief for the Catholic church, but no 
opposition to them will prosper if based 
upon falsehood. 

The Masonic Chronicler of Chicago, 
on September 8, 191 7, stated the case as 
follows : 

'Tt is asserted that hundreds of these 
men will be Masons, some will be Ma- 
sons desiring to take more degrees, and 
others will be sons of Masons. The 
Masonic bodies of Atlanta planned to 
expend $5,000 on a hall where Masons 
could meet, and where various forms of 
recreation and amusement approved by 
the government could be provided. On 
submitting their plan to the War De- 
partment they were astounded, the dis- 
patch says, to receive the information 
from Adjutant-General H. G. Learnard 
that The secretary of war desires me 
to inform you that no organization will 
be allowed on the grounds except the 
Young Men's Christian Association and 
the Knights of Columbus.' " 

The Menace, of September 8, in al- 
most a half page given to this matter 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



185 



and to praise of Freemasonry gives the 
same garbled report, and says : 

"It must be, then, that what The 
Menace has been saying all these years 
is true, namely, that they [the Catholics'] 
have insinuated themselves into the body 
politic in this country until they are 
actually in control of the situation and 
are able to dictate the policies of our 
government ! 

*'If this is not true, in what other way 
do you account for this unheard of dis- 
crimination?" 

The answer to this question is that, 
had the Menace published the truth and 
the whole truth, its readers could have 
judged for themselves as to the fairness 
of the government in providing clubs 
for Protestants, Catholics, and Jews, 
and letting it go at that. 

Fair play and speaking the whole 
truth is not to be found in lodge tactics, 
and the Masonic editorial staff of the 
Menace betrays that paper's alliance. 



A MISTRIAL. 

One of the jurors lately passing out 
tor the day from a supreme court room 
m New England having made an indis- 
creet remark to a lawyer sitting within 
the bar enclosure, the judge promptly 
declared a mistrial. Earlier in the same 
case, the attorney for the defendants 
had seen a wmk and some passes be- 
tween a juror and a witness, but had 
done nothing. The witness also dis- 
played a secret society badge on the 
lape of his coat, while the juror was 
similarly labeled. The suit itself was 
entered to recover thirty thousand do^- 
lars for injuries alleged to have been 
caused by an auto belonging to the busi- 
ness company which was the defend- 
ant. The judge not only took this dam- 
age case from the jury, but in addition 
requested that no juror should wear the 
msignia of any secret order during a 
session of the superior court in which 
he was presiding. Action of this kind 
would sweep that kind of rubbish out 
ot court rooms, the more certainly be- 
cause lawyers would not forget to see 
that witnesses were as careful as jurors 
Something like a direct affront to courts 
of law would thus be abated ; for inter- 
ference with justice, which is an old 



and gray secret society scandal, would 
be no longer symbolized. 

TWO PER CENT. PATRIOTISM. 

We don't much like the term, "patri- 
otic Masons." The two terms should 
be synonymous : To be a Mason is to be 
a patriot. — Texas Freemason. 

The fact is, the two words are not 
synonymous. If they were, the state- 
ment when reversed would be equally 
true : "To be a patriot is to be a Mason." 
This is ridiculous, for we should then 
have only two million patriots from out 
of our more than one hundred millions 
of people. 

We were thinking it might be a good 
plan to send a few divisions of these 
Masonic fire eaters to the front, but 
upon second thought, when we realized 
what might happen should the enemy 
give the "grand hailing sign of distress," 
we abandoned the idea as an unworthy 
thought. 



MASONIC TREASON. 

The question is often asked, Was 
Huerta a Mason? He was, belonging 
to a lodge in Jalapa, which expelled him 
for the murder of President Madero and 
Vice President Suarez, both 33° Masons. 
When Bernardo Reyes and Felix Diaz, 
both 33° Masons, were ca-ught in open 
rebellion against the legally constituted 
government, thereby legally and Mason- 
ically forfeited their life, Madero par- 
doned them because they were Masons, 
which generosity, through the ungrate- 
ful treachery of these two men, he lost 
his own life. — Texas Freemason. 

If it is true that President Madero 
pardoned two rebels because they were 
Masons^ then he was guilty of a treason- 
able act towards his country. Who 
knows but that Reyes and Diaz may 
have given Madero the "grand hailing 
sign of distress" and that the president, 
confronted with the dilemma of per- 
forming his .vows to his lodge or those 
to his country, chose the treasonable 
course against his country. Certain it is 
that Masonic influence was used. 

During our Civil War thousands of 
soldiers were taken into Freemasonry 
because of the same brand of treason- 
able assistance promised to them should 



186 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917. 



they fall into the hands of the enemy, 
^lany of these stories are being served 
up for the nth time by the Masonic 
press as though it is a matter for praise 
that men under solemn pledges to their 
country in war crises should lightly cast 
all aside to assist someone whom they 
may not know but who happens to be 
able to give a few mystic signs and pass- 
words. Shameless treason is the real 
name of such double dealings. 

One Masonic paper recently had the 
audacity to say that "another crop of 
war time Masonic stories is coming 
along." If so, then we have a lot of 
^Masons in the service of our country 
who think more of Masonry than they 
do of their allegiance to their country. 



WHOSE OX IS GORED? 

Tlie IVatchman-Examiner of August 
23 said in an editorial paragraph : 'The 
murder of Ruth Cruger was one of the 
most cruel in the annals of crime. May- 
be Cocchi, the murderer, was lying, but 
the press reports give the following as 
a part of his confession. 'After a 
troubled day and a sleepless night, I 
went, on the fifteenth, about 3 130 o'clock, 
and confessed the crime to Father 
Moretto, who had married me. I then 
decided to return to Italy.' If this is 
true, we have another evidence of the 
curse of auricular confession. The mur- 
derer gets the burden ofi^ his heart, and 
the priest was obliged to 'keep his 
secret.' " 

So would a Protestant minister be 
obliged to keep exactly the same kind of 
secret, if both he and the criminal were 
Royal Arch Masons. 



MORE KNIGHTS. 

Another annex to Freemasonry has 
been built, and its tenants are Knights of 
Birmingham. What they wear we are 
not yet informed, although this is hardly 
less important a question than, "What did 
she have on?" Feathers, ribbons, tinsel 
and colors may for the present be left 
to imagination. A news report conveys 
the impression that candidates arrive 
within the sacred enclosure by way of a 
rough and rocky road, passable only to 
those who have survived the pains and 
perils of exalted Masonry. Having al- 
ready purified their hearts and perfected 



their conduct by means of banquets, 
dances, and whatever else may, outside 
consecrated precincts, seem mentionable 
or unmentionable, they at length attain 
the supernal wisdom of the ineffable se- 
crets of the noble order of Knights of 
Birmingham. All hail ! latest cohort of 
the interminable procession of feathered 
bipeds. Hail ! 



i^etusi of (0ur OTorfe. 



FRIENDS OF SOLDIERS, 
ATTENTION! 

In these days of stress and storm of 
war, when every dollar is called upon to 
do its utmost for the material and the 
spiritual interest of humanity, it is fitting 
that we take into consideration what our 
highest duty is under present conditions. 
In what way can we make our influence 
count for most? How can we use our re- 
sources in the most economical manner 
and accomplish the most good ? How can 
we reach the greatest number in the 
most direct way? Questions such as 
these are worthy of our deepest thought. 

In this great crisis, it is vital to our 
national safety, that the physical, intel- 
lectual, moral and spiritual welfare of 
our young men who are called to the 
service of their country be carefully 
guarded. Removed from home influ- 
ences, and subjected to new environ- 
ments, these young men are beset with 
peculiar temptations. It will be our part 
to follow them to the camps and in what- 
ever way possible, help them to endure, 
and encourage them to stand for truth, 
and make it easier for them to live clean 
and open lives. 

It has been agreed by the oflicers of 
the Iowa Christian Association, to omit 
our annual fall convention, and use what- 
ever funds we may raise in the printing 
and distribution of tracts and other liter- 
ature among our soldiers. This money 
has been turned into the treasury of the 
National Christian Association and is to 
be used as stated above. 

As president of the Iowa Christian 
Association, I therefore announce this as 
the policy of the Association for this 
year, and I take great pleasure in tender- 
ing to the National Christian Association 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



187 



the resources of the Iowa Association, 
with the understanding that they shall be 
used in providing suitable literature 
which shall be placed in the hands of our 
soldier boys free of charge. 

It is earnestly desired and urged that 
our friends respond liberally and cheer- 
fully to the call for funds, as they have 
done in the past. The omission of the 
State Convention is not to be regarded in 
any respect as a backward step. It is 
only the diverting of the expenses of 
such a convention into a more direct 
channel of influence for good toward 
those who need our best help. Let us 
give, w4th the view of placing such liter- 
ature in the hands of our boys as they 
answer the call of their country and ours, 
as shall help to fortify them against the 
evils which so persistently threaten them, 
and shall lead them in the way of truth 
and righteousness. 

A. AI. Malcolm, 
President of Iowa Christian Association. 

Albia, Iowa. 

Iowa Treasurer's Report 
Since the National Christian Associa- 
tion has agreed to print and distribute 
tracts among soldiers and the various 
cantonments, I hereby remit to you the 
following personal gifts and church of- 
ferings wdiich I have received : from 
Rev. P. J. Bunge. $6 : "N. N." per Rev. 
P. J. Bunge, $1 ; Rev. G. A. Pegram, $2 ; 
and from the following Christian Re- 
formed Churches, of Iowa, Parkersburg, 
$5; Prairie City, $io; Middleburg, 
%7.77\ Ocheyedan, $7.16; Sioux Center, 
$45.16; Eddyville, $6.39; Oskaloosa, 
$5.70 ; Peoria, $14.95 5 Leighton, $5. En- 
closed you will find my check for $116.13. 
]\Iay we expect a report of what is 
done with this money in the Christian 
Cynosure as soon as you have carried 
out the program ? 

If there should come a shower of free 
will offerings from our friends in Iowa 
who see that a great deal of good can be 
accomplished by means of the tracts I 
shall also turn those offerings over to 
you to be used for the same purpose. 
A. H. Brat, Treasurer. 



the total fund the two hundred dollars 
agreed upon. 



There has been received by the Cyno- 
sure office from the churches of Iowa, 
sufficient additional contributions to make 



SECRETARY PHILLIP'S LETTER. 

The geographies studied in my boy- 
hood days represented Nebraska as a 
part of the Great American Desert. I 
have labored for a short time in the 
northeastern part of the state and have 
seen nothing resembling a desert. Every- 
where there are abundant harvests of 
hay, grain and corn. There is great 
prosperity. Automobiles are almost as 
numerous as were the blackbirds in 
places. 

There are a multitude of antisecretists 
in this part of the state — Mennonites, 
Friends, Free Methodists and Lutherans, 
and individuals among other denomina- 
tions. The large majority, however, are 
German, Swedish, Norwegian and Dan- 
ish American Lutherans. They are a 
thrifty class and will be a tower of finan- 
cial strength to the National Christian 
Association when they understand its 
aims and work. 

I labored in Norfolk, Battle Creek, 
Tilden, Oakdale, Neligh, Clearwater, 
O'Neill, Plainview, Pierce, Stanton, 
Beemer, Scribner, Hooper, and Fremont, 
bearing testimony publicly and privately 
that there is no way Home but by the 
Cross, and that lodge religion is pagan. 
I visited about three thousand houses 
and left some of our literature, always 
stopping to add my personal testimony if 
the opportunity w^as given. I found some 
earnest souls desiring light — men and 
women who were determined to obey 
God and follow wdiere he leads. It was a 
great pleasure to minister to these broth- 
ers and sisters. 

I have already mentioned the privilege 
accorded me of presenting our cause 
before the North Nebraska District 
Conference of Lutherans of the Mis- 
souri Synod, and their endorsement 
of the purposes and objects of the 
Association, and that the Conference 
deems it worthy of their support. Several 
ministers assured me that they would 
take up with their churches, or with one 
of its societies such as the Young Peo- 
ples', or Ladies' Aid, the matter of help- 
ing financially and see what could be 
done. Let us pray that this plan may 
succeed and an adequate support be 



188 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917 



given to the Association so that present 
work may be sustained and greatly in- 
creased. Last year the amount received 
in this way from the Reformed Presby- 
terians was an earnest, we hope, of what 
the other reHgious bodies in sympathy 
with us shall do. For some years wq 
have owed much to the support of the 
Christian Reformed churches. 

Returning to the office on September 
I2th, I have been busy with N. C. A. 
matters demanding attention. One of 
these was the securing of permission for 
the distribution of a specially prepared 
tract among the soldiers and sailors. 

A'isiting one of the Camps I was di- 
rected to the Y. M. C. A. secretary who 
promptly told me that such a tract should 
not be distributed, that while he was not 
a ^lason now he expected to be within a 
year. He had been advised to such a 
course both by his pastor, a J\Iason, and 
his most highly esteemed college teacher, 
a Mason and Odd-Fellow. After vainly 
trying to shed a little light I left him. I 
then visited the encampment at Great 
Lakes and was courteously received by 
the Secretary or person in charge of re- 
ligious work at the Y. M. C. A., who 
said they were forbidden to allow the 
circulation of any "propaganda" matter. 
He suggested that a copy of the tract to 
be used be submitted for endorsement 
by the national body, then it would have 
to be received by all of the Y. M. C. A.'s 
in the different camps. This is doubtless 
a wise provision, but anyway it is the 
road we shall follow until we are suc- 
cessful or come to the end. 

September has been a wonderfully 
pleasant month in which to labor. This 
has been especially true for those who 
must be away from home and office. 
Almost every day has been as ''perfect 
as a day in June." God's care and con- 
stant blessing to both body and soul have 
given joy and efficiency in the w^ork. 
"Many have been praying for you here 
in the College Church" wrote my daugh- 
ter in one of her letters ; and I know of 
others who remember me, for the works 
sake, at the hour of intercessory prayer ; 
and so we have fellowship in the w^ork 
and are co-workers together. My one 
desire was to be a blessing to some hearts 
wherever I went, and I believe I was. 
Wm. I. Phillips. 



THE ORANGE LODGE. 



A Seceder's Testimony. 

After taking the Royal Arch degree 
in the Orange lodge, I was so shocked 
with its blasphemous oath, etc., that I 
never again returned to the lodge, not- 
withstanding that I was an unsaved man 
at that time. I find some who are not 
aware of the wickedness entailed in the 
obligations of that oath. 

For some forty-seven years I have ex- 
perienced the personal protection of my 
Saviour when exposing that awful 
Orange oath in public. I have been at- 
tacked by my enemies, but they were un- 
able to disfigure me in the least. When 
I was picked up it was found that my 
skin was not marred or even bruised. 
Glory to God, I still live, and in defiance 
of the Devil, because he has no power 
over me except it be given him of my 
Father in heaven. My faith claimed that 
blessed promise and I have proved it to 
be true, bless his holy Name. 

Twice since that assault I have been 
delivered out of the hands of murderers, 
and I know that Jesus lives and helps his 
children just the same as he ever did. 
'T can do all things through Christ 
which strengtheneth me." "All things 
are possible to him that believeth." 

Buffalo, N. Y^. Edward Swan. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

This eighteenth of September finds me 
at w®rk in "Dixie land." I am writing at 
the home of our good friend Daniel 
Shenk of Denbigh, Va. On every side 
are the evidences of thrift and prosper- 
ity. Birds are singing and roses, cotton, 
and magnolias are in bloom. At Fentress, 
Va.. at the home of our good friend 
A. D. Wenger, I saw a fine field of well 
matured corn, grown on a field that 
earlier in the season had produced a large 
crop of potatoes. Some of those potatoes 
were marketed at nine dollars per barrel. 
To a northern man, ripening figs, the 
large fields of peanuts and a thousand 
other things are of great interest. 

Two Sabbaths in this section I have 
spent with the two Mennonite colonies 
composed largely of farmers wdio have 
come from the North. Their pioneering 
stage has passed and they are happy and 



October, 1917. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



189 



contented in the new homes that become 
pleasanter as they are improved from 
year to year. They are naturally too 
busy to become interested in lodges and 
besides they have too much good judg- 
ment to go after them. There are multi- 
tudes of lodges and lodge people in the 
Virginia cities and also in some of the 
country districts. I have tried in vain to 
get appointments in some churches where 
the truth which the N. C. A. presents is 
greatly needed. The ease loving multi- 
tudes are not seeking light regarding 
their lodge sins. 

At Fentress, I gave three addresses 
besides teaching a Bible class and ad- 
dressing the Sabbath school. Following 
the instruction to the Bible class and 
Sabbath school, I spoke at length in the 
forenoon to a large audience that came 
through the rain that they might get the 
antilodge truths, and again at three 
o'clock in the afternoon, and also at seven 
thirty in the evening. The church was 
again filled last evening to hear the 
''chart talk." Forty-six new Cynosure 
subscriptions and substantial contribu- 
tions have been received. Surely friends 
in the Southland are coming to the help 
of the Lord against the mighty ! 

I wish I might write of those who 
have helped, but space does not permit. 
When I wrote last month from the Cum- 
berland valley, in Pennsylvania, I was in 
the midst of a very interesting work. I 
attended a harvest home meeting in the 
barn of our good friend. Rev. William 
M. Asper, near Mowersville. The people 
gathered in large numbers and much 
harvest praise was offered. At meetings 
in the church of the Brethren in Christ 
near at hand, many speakers including 
your representative were privileged to 
give needed truth. Friends were kind 
and I was given a liberal share of the 
time. 

While passing through Alechanicsburg, 
Pa., I saw advertisements posted stating 
that an ''Owls' nest" was to be formed 
in that town on August 31st. A special 
effort to induce the desirable to become 
"Owls" was being put forth. I was told 
there were to be both male and female 
Owls. There are of course, in everv 
community some owlish people. T do not 
think there are many in this enlightened 
community who would wish their town 



turned over to the "Owls" and "Bats." 
There were doubtless enough to start a 
"nest." The good people of this, and 
every other town where these birds ap- 
pear should be awake to the dangers and 
tell the deluded of the better way. 

I was informed that a District Confer- 
ence of the Church of the Brethren, 
would meet at Oakton, Va., on August 
30th. I was given opportunity there to 
present a greeting from the National 
Christian Association, which was kindly 
received. I have distributed tracts and 
looked up friend in Norfolk, Newport 
News, Rescue and other adjacent points 
in this vicinity. Pastors of the Friends, 
Nazarene, United Presbyterian, and 
other churches there have expressed an 
interest and will likely arrange for lec- 
tures. Soldiers and sailors are every- 
where in evidence here, large camps are 
being erected, aviators are flying in all 
directions, and everywhere there is ac- 
tivity. This is no time for the reformer 
to sleep or even to get drowsy. We 
should not only have our "lamps trimmed 
and burning" but we should be turning 
on the searchlights with all the power 
that is at hand. The forc-es of darkness 
are especially active in war times. The 
forces of light are yet to dispell the 
moral darkness of this sin cursed earth. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

Since our last report the followiiiQ- coiitri- 
bntions have been received : ]\lrs. Marv W. 
Templeton. $4: J. B. Barnes, $P : S. F. 
SnrimQer, $1; Frank L. Gibson, $4/25 ; O. N. 
Carnahan. $-5 ; Rev. G. M. Robb, $5 : L. Wood- 
ruff, $10; A. G. Dornheim. $2: Rev. S. P. 
Lono-, $1 ; S. A. Crunkleton. $10 ; Miss Laura 
L. Heath, $2 ; Rev. F. E. Allen. $1 ; Wm. I. 
Phillips. $11: Miss Sarah E. Davison, $2; Rev. 
Fr. Wambssanss, $1; Fred T. Stevenson, $1 : 
Mrs. J. C. Woodward.'$l : Louis Joh, $5; Dr. 
N. S. Couto Esher, $3: Mrs. R. H. Phillips, 
$10; Miss S. F. Hinman, $1; Wm. L. Brown, 
$10; Miss Margaret Cooper, $2; N. P. Bourne. 
$10; Martin Geiss. $5; Rev. :M. Adams, $1 ; 
Tohn Wynburg, $2; Rev. W. B. Stoddard. $10; 
Rev. T- J. Coleman. $1 ; Rev. G. A. Peeram, 
$3; Rev. T. C. McKnight, $1 ; Rev. Thomas 
C. ^IcFall. $0.50 ; Mar^- C. Fleming. $5 : R. H. 
Tavlor, $3 ; Mrs. C. R. Hartman, $1 : Rev. F. 
A. Hertwig, $1; Prof. Newton Wrav. $3; 
Wilmot Sigsworth, $5; Rev. S. R-. Paris, $5; 
Rev. J. M. Coleman. $4; Dr. A. D. Pitcher. 
$2; Carl Fbeling, $1; A. G. Anderson. $3; 
^Valter I. Phillips. $5; Pres. C. A. Blanchard, 
$10: F. E. F. Bailev, $1: mother of E. E. E. 
Bailev. $1 : Prof. T. R. Millin, $10, and Miss 
Eliza F. Potter, $3.08. . 



190 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917 



The following have taken Sustaining Mem- 
berships of $2 each : A. D. Osborn, Theo. N. 
Bosher, U^illiam Harder, Rev. W. H. Loth- 
man, J. B. Rockwell, J\Iiss xA.nn E. Hinsdale, 
R. F. ^Mosher, Jake Smits, and Thomas O. 
Smith. 

For the Tract Fund for soldiers the fol- 
lowing contributions have been received : 
From ^liss Eliza F. Potter, $5 ; Miss Laura 
L. Heath, $1; Miss Martha Nicoll, $1; Iowa 
Christian Association. $116.13, being the con- 
tributions from individuals and Christian Re- 
formed churches in Iowa, paid to the Treas- 
urer of the Iowa Association, Rev. A. H. Brat, 
as follows : Rev. P. J. Bunge,_ $6 ; "N.N.," $1 ; 
Rev. G. A. Pegram, $2; Christian Reformed 
churches at Parkersburg, $5 ; Prairie City, $10 ; 
]\Iiddleburg, $7.77 ; Ocheveclan, $7.1(3 ; Sioux 
Center, $45.16; Eddyville. $6.39; Oskaloosa, 
$5.70; Peoria, $14.95, and Leighton, $5. 

Christian Reformed churches and societies 
have contributed the following : Sherman St., 
Grand Rapids, Mich., $10 ; Second Church, 
Paterson, N. J., $25.56; Kalamazoo, N. W. 
Michigan, $10.25 ; Franklin St., Kalamazoo, 
Mich.,^$17.12; Bethel. Kalamazoo, Mich., $8.62; 
Summit, 111.. $14.75; Goshen, Ind., $1.75; Elpis, 
Colo., $2.60; Classis of Illinois, $78.83; Neland 
Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich., $5, and Men's 
Bible Class, Central Ave., Holland, Mich., $5. 

Contributions have been received for the 
following Reformed Presbyterian churches 
and societies : Sabbath School, Eskridge, 
Kan., $5.97 ; Clarinda, la., $15, and Morning 
Sun, la., $7.50. . 

W. I. Phillips, Treasurer. 



SOUTHERN AGENT'S REPORT. 

REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

The dear old Cynosure is full of God 
sent blessings this month as usual, shed- 
ing light in dark places and displaying 
the mysteries of God's eternal truth to a 
crooked and perverse generation of evil 
doers. 

Since my last letter, Satan has not 
ceased day and night his attempts to dis- 
rupt my work and unsettle me in my 
pastorate, but, God be prai!?ed, I am 
ready and willing not only to suffer af- 
flictions and persecutions, but, if needs 
be, to die for the sake of the gospel of 
our Lord Jesus Christ. Not being able to 
bring any other accusation against my 
ministry the lovers of darkness in Pass 
Christian, Miss., have started a rumor 
that I made statements encouraging Ne- 
groes to arm themselves against the 
whites, that I have used vulgarity in the 
pulpit, and have abused young men and 
women. What I did, was to admonish 
my people to be loyal to their country 
and flag, and to fight valiantly against the 
foreign enemy, to preserve our demo- 



cratic form of government and our re- 
publican institutions. I also admonished 
the young men to refrain from licentious 
living, to be true husbands to one wife, 
and to properly take care of their wives. 
I also advised them to shun the wicked 
and Christless secret societies as they 
would rattlesnakes. To the young 
women, I advised that they prize true 
womanhood and virtue above fine dress 
or the pleasures of the world — to "buy 
the truth and sell it not." I told them 
that if they desire to lead pure lives, to 
shun oath bound secret societies. These 
statements have caused a mighty rum- 
bling among the secretists and their sym- 
pathizers and they are leaving no stone 
unturned to unsettle me and confuse my 
church. But praise God, I am anchored 
in the rock of his Word, and I shall 
faithfully declare the truth so that the 
blood of these peoples shall not be re- 
quired at my hands. I shall blow the 
trumpet and ■ sound the alarm, warning 
them of their sin. 

I have just closed a blessed and glori- 
ous revival in the First Baptist church, 
Rev. B. J. Cole, pastor, New Orleans, 
La. Twenty-six souls were saved from 
their sins, and twenty-one of this number 
were baptized and joined the church. 
Several backsliders were also reclaimed. 
The secret empire as well as kindred sins 
was plainly exposed and it resulted in 
a great spiritual love feast. I also con- 
ducted a Bible Institute at Israel Baptist 
church. Rev. A. J. Thomas, pastor. New 
Orleans. 

The National Christian Association is 
doing a much needed and indispensable 
work in its opposition to the saloon, and 
the Christless and idolatrous oath-bound 
secret societies. 



"LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER." 

Hollywood, Miss., Sept. 5, 1917. 
I will continue an account of experi- 
ences at Lakeside, Ark. Some professors 
and their wives went to Lakeside and set 
up the lodge known as the Royal Circle. 
They inveigled an old lady, seventy-five 
years old into it. She had a husband and 
five sons. The lodge people told her that 
she was old but if her sons would keep 
her dues and her endowment paid up, 
when she died they would get $350, and 
she would have a hundred dollar burial. 



October, 19l7. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



191 



So one of her boys kept up her dues, 
thinking that his old father could have 
the $350, if he should live the longest. 
This went on for three years, when she 
died. The lodge w^as notified and the 
King and his son called the lodge to- 
gether and the King asked, "How did 
that woman at 75 years get into this 
lodge ? We don't take members in at that 
age. I don't see how she got in here un- 
less she said she was younger." Then 
her youngest son said to the King, "You 
know you are a liar when you say that 
my dear old mother beat her w^ay into 
this lodge. Y^our ow^n son set up this 
lodge and my mother told her true age 
and he said it was all right. Now you 
are trying to get out of paying up. We 
are able to bury our mother and you need 
not lie about her any more. We will not 
stand for that." The King said, "We w^ill 
bury her. We will give her a fifty dollar 
burial and give you fifty dollars." We 
cannot give any more, for she was too 
old." Her oldest son said, "Old or young 
I kept up her dues and her endowment 
and we don't want to have a tight over 
our dead mother. We are all through 
with your money graft." So the Royal 
Circle buried her and gave the old man 
fifty dollars and that ended it. One of 
her sons said, "Mrs. Roberson, I felt as 
though I wanted to fight the whole lodge 
gang for trying to make the people be- 
lieve that my dear old Christian mother 
was beating her way. They fooled her 
into it. She told them she w^as too old 
to keep up her dues and my oldest broth- 
er said he would keep it up and he did 
for three years. That broke up the Royal 
Circle out here at Lakeside. We all had 
enough of their lies to last us a life time. 
They w^ill never get any more of our 
money in this settlement." 

This man also said, "They persuaded 
me to join the Knights of Pythias. I 
was told to jump on a bed of steel spikes 
and when I would not, they pushed me 
off of a scaffold into an old wagon sheet 
and then threw me up till my head hit 
the ceiling of the room. When I got out 
of that hall I never went back again." 
The man that told this had been a gam- 
bler but he was converted in the Lake- 
side meeting. Forty-one converted peo- 
ple are there now, and those that w'ere in 
lodges gave them up. 



I have been to Forrest City, Brinkley, 
and Hot Springs, Arkansas, since I left 
Lakeside, and 1 have been at Hollywood, 
Miss., for twelve days. The people are 
very wicked down here. The country is 
full of preachers and also of bootleggers. 
If the preachers would condemn sin there 
would be a better people. Sin is a re- 
proach to any people. God doesn't w^ant 
us to sin (Ps. 4:4), but to fear God and 
keep his commandments is the wdiole 
duty of man (Eccl. 12:13). We get the 
people together and teach them God's 
Word and some of them tell us that we 
cannot keep God's commandment while 
here on earth. Poor things, they tell the 
sinner that if he doesn't quit sinning he 
wall go to hell and they are doing the 
same things the sinner does. What will 
become of them is stated in Ezekiel 33 : 
10-19. 

My people are doing the best they 
know how. \Yt are loyal to the flag, and 
to our country. Wt do not want social 
equality, but we do want equal rights. 
If the white people will pay the negro 
just wages for his work in the South he 
will stay here. The negro is not going 
north for social equality, but to get living 
w^ages. We are at a loss when in a train 
with the white folks. We are not used 
to it and we are better oft among our 
own people. \\q pay first class fare on 
the railroads and want to, but we prefer 
to ride in separate coaches. The white 
people in the South don't pay us living 
wages. If we had cold weather here such 
as they have in the North we could not 
exist on the wages we get here. We hope 
our white brethren will learn to treat us 
better in the South and give us living 
wages. The black man is, in spite of all 
his ignorance, a faithful friend of the 
white man. May God help us to pray 
for all men (i Tim. 2:2-7,) that we may 
lead a' quiet and peaceable life, Y^'ours for 
him who said, I am the way, 

Lizzie Robersox. 



New Albion, Iowa. July 11, 1917. 
Enclosed you will find a check for 
one dollar in payment of my subscrip- 
tion to the Cynosure. I do not wish to 
do without- your valuable magazine and 
do hope it may prosper for many years. 
(Rev.) Robert A. Padex. 



i92 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1917. 



FROM ARKANSAS. 

^lariana, Arkansas, August 5, 1917. 
Dear Brother Phillips. 

I feel led of the Lord to tell you how 
I enjoy reading your literature against 
lodges. I thank God for the work you 
do along that line. 

]\Irs. Lizzie Roberson was here not 
long ago and how she went after the 
lodges ! The Devil got mad, but he 
could not stop her. She sold many of 
your books during the three weeks she 
was with us, and after she left some of 
the Masons found to whom she had sold 
some of the books and bought them. 
One man first borrowed the book from 
one of the ladies and then he told her 
he was going to keep it. She said, 
"No. I bought that book." He said, 
I'll pay you for it, and she replied, "Sis- 
ter Roberson will order one for you," 
but that was not what he wanted. 

One gentleman confessed to Sister 
Roberson that the "Masonic order is not 
what people claim it is, but I've been 
in it for thirty years and have spent so 
much money there that I hate to give it 
up. If I had my money out I would 
quit it." He told me to-day that he 
has almost reached the point where he 
is willing to give it up. 

This town is full of secret orders and 
the people worship in their lodges more 
than they do in their churches. One 
gentleman was saved when Sister 
Roberson was here and has given up his 
lodge. 

I will be glad when the Lord, through 
your good movement, breaks up everv 
lodge in the world. I shall pray God 
to hasten on the day when these evil 
things will come to an end. Yours for 
the gospel of Christ, 

LiLLIE L. HiGHTOWER. 



Seneca Falls, New York, 

May 21, 19 1 7. 
The Association will never know the 
good you accomplished until the judg- 
tnent comes and rewards are given. 
(Rev.) S. D. Wilcox. 

Boulder, Colo., Aug. 3, 1917. 
I expect to take the Cynosure as long 
as I live. I loan it to my neighbors in 
the hope of its enlig^htening them on the 
evik of lodgeism. Yours in the Master's 
service, A. L. Hunting. 



Detroit, Mich., Aug. 16, 1917. 

"T enclose a dollar bill. You deserve 
more. All good causes deserve more 
financial assistance than they get. Doubt- 
ful ventures get a plenty. I simply can- 
not understand the inner mechanism of 
the mind, not to speak of the conscience, 
which can make lodgery and Christianity 
agree. They are putting a great big "D" 
into their logic and a pernicious blight 
into their religion. 

The Synodical Conference of the Lu- 
theran church has found that, while it 
may not pay financially or politically to 
oppose the lodges, it certainly pays "re- 
ligiously." And, after all, the church is 
neither a financial nor a political, but a 
rcUgioiis institution." 

(Rev.) F. A. Hertwig. 



Topeka, Kansas, July 20, 191 7. 
Enclosed please find $1 for another 
year's subscription to your good maga- 
zine. My husband says the Cynosure 
interests him more than any other pa- 
per, so he lends it to others. We think 
Mrs. Lizzie Roberson is a brave woman 
and that you are all taking the stand 
Christ would have you take. 

Mrs. Robt. Patterson. 



J. W. Purvis of Junction City, Ohio, 
writes :. "I am sure that the Christian 
Cynosure has been a source of good to 
me. I have never been in any way con- 
nected with a secret fraternity, I have 
from a boy been opposed to them, and 
the older I grow and see the effects of 
these organizations, the more strong be- 
comes my opposition to them." 



Rives Junction, Mich. 
I am sending one dollar for the 
Cynosure for another year. I don't 
want to be without it. I think it gets 
better all the time. 

(Rev.) S. A. Man well. 



Orangeville, Illinois, 

March 14, 191 7. 
You will find enclosed draft for $2 
for which please advance my subscrip- 
tion for the Cynosure. I believe that 
no other paper is fighting the battle for 
Christ as does the Cynosure. 

G. B. GOODHART. 



SPECIAL BARGAINS 

Reductions on Antisecret 
Books 



SEARCH LIGHTS ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 



Our Inventory shows about forty differ- 
ent kinds of books and pamphlets— odds 
and ends — which, on account of the limited 
supply, it will not pay to advertise in our 
general catalog. 

While they last we offer them at reduced 
prices. Some are in perfect condition, 
while others are shopworn or slightly dam- 
aged. We have made our prices according- 
ly and will give you the best copies we can. 

This list offers a fine selection of litera- 
ture on reform lines and after our supply is 
gone, much of it will be impossible to ob- 
tain. 

Temis — Cash with order. If you order 
something which has been sold out we will 
refund your overpayment unless you au- 
thorize us to substitute at our discretion. 
This is distinctly a cash proposition; do not 
order C. O. D. or on approval. 

Cjmosure Subscribers, new or old, who 
pay their subscription one year in advance 
and send 50 cents additional ($1.50 in all), 
or any old subscriber who sends in a new 
yearly subscription with 50 cents additional 
($1.50 in all), may select one dollar's worth 
of the books in this list, which will be sent 
postpaid to one address. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 

TION, 

850 W. Madison St.. Chicago, IH. 



R1TUAX.S. 



Carlile's Manual of Freemasonry. Fourth 
Edition, 1845. 356 pages, cloth. Price, 
$1.50. 

PATRIARCHS MILITANT 



Adopted by Sov. Grand Lodfe, Independent 
Order of Odd-Fellows, 1885. Copy of charge 
book with mflltary diagrams, etc Paper cover, 
26 cents. 



GOOD TEMPLARISM 

An exposition of the Lodge, Temple, and 
Council degrees. Paper cover, 25 cents. 

KNIGHTS OP LABOR 

An exposition of the order, includlBg ub- 
wrltten work. Paper cover, 20 centa. 

KNIGHTS OF THE ORIENT 

Ritual of the Ancient Order of tti* Orient; a 
side degree. Paper cever. 26 cen«» 



SCRAP BOOKS 

Containing 31 "Cynosure" (old series) tracts. 
A valuable collection of antilodge literature. 
Paper cover, price, 20 cents. 

LIGHT ON FREEMASONRY, APPE]f- 

DIX TO 

By Eld. David Bernard, who was the first 
Mason to publicly secede following the abduc- 
tion of Wm. Morgan. Paper cover, price, \9 
cents. 

FIVE IN ONE 

Morgan's Exposition; History of the Abduc- 
tion of Morgan; Confession of the Abduction of 
Morgan, by Valance; Bernard's Remlnlacencee 
of Morgan Times; and Oaths and Penalties of 
S3 Degrees of Freemasonry, bound together. 
Cloth cover, price, 50 cents. 

PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
THE SIXTH ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION, N. C. A. 

At Syracuse, N. Y., 1874. Addresses by Rev. 

B. T. Roberts, Chas. D. Green (Mayor of Ba- 
tavia, N. Y., during Morgan excitement), Pres. 

C. A. Blanchard, Rev. D. P. Rathbun, Rev. J. 
R. Baird (ex -Mason), Mrs. C. B. Miller, Elder 
David Bernard, and others. Paper cover, 150 
pages, price, 20 cents. 

PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESSES AT 
THE SEVENTH ANNUAL CON- 
VENTION, N. C. A. 
At Pittsburgh, Pa., 1876. Addressee by Rev. 

D. R. Kerr, D.D., Rev. B. T. Roberti, Ptof. J. 
R. W. Slcane, D.D., Pres. J. Blanchard, Rev. 
A. M. MiUigan, D.D., Rev. C. A. Blanchard. and 
others. Paper cover, 96 pagee, price 20 cents. 

BiainNISCENCES OF MORGAN TIMBS. 

By Elder David Bernard. This is a thrilling 
narrative of the incidents connected with Ber- 
nard's Revelation of Freemasonry. 10 cente. 

REVIEW OF TWO MASONIC AD- 

DRESSES 

By Bid. John O. Steams. Paper cever, 72 
pages, price, 5 ceots. 

DANGER SIGNALS NO. 1 

Testimonies with portraits of Dr. J. M. Qray. 
Joseph Cook, Dr. A. J. Oordan, Mrs. Hannah 
J. Bailey, and others. Cloth cover, priee, 16 
cents. 



8BRMON8 AND ADDRESSES ON SE. 
CRET SOCIETIES 

By Kev. W. P. McNary, Rev. James WUllams. 
Pres. J. Blanchard, Pres. H. H. George, and 
others. Fourteen addresses bound tocether. 

Cloth cover, price, 60 cents. 



THE CARPENTER BOOKLET 

Containing the testimonies of Deacon nuie 
Carpenter; teachers and olBeeiis in Amerlona 
Mlsalonary Asaodatlon; Ministers: 
Colleges, etc. Paper cover, pNce, 10 



HOLDEN WITH CORDS 

By E. E. Fl&gg. A thrilling narrative which 
will hold the interest of adults and children 
and at the same time give them the true ac- 
count of the Morgan times. The covers of some 
have been damaged by water, but the pages are 
in good condition. 384 pages; cloth cover, price, 
35 cents; paper cover, 25 cents. 

BROKEN SEAIr, THE 

Personal reminiscences of the Abduction and 
Murder of Morgan. By Samuel D. Greene, a 
member with William Morgan of the Masonic 
lodge at Batavia, N. Y. Mr. Greene became a 
famous anti-Masonic lecturer and because of it 
suffered persecutions by the Masons. Paper 
cover, 304 pages, price, 25 cents. 

CONDEMNATION OF SECRET SO- 
CIETIES 

By Rev. L. V. HarreU (United Brethren). 
Paper covers, 3 cents. 

MYSTICAL LIFE, THE, AND HOUSE- 
TOP PROCLAMATIONS 

A compilation of Methodist et aL testimonies 
with portraits of prominent men: Dr. J. M. 
Buckley, John Wesley, A. T. Jennings, Wood- 
ruffl Post, and many others. A valuable book- 
let. Paper cover, 88 pages, price, 15 cents. 

MISCELLANEOUS 



HELPS TO BIBLE STUDY 

With practical notes on the books of Scrip- 
ture; Methods of Study: Rules of Interpretation; 
Types and Symbols; Analysis of the Books of 
the Bible. Cloth cover, 196 pages, price, 16 
e«nt«. 

SECRET INSTRUCTIONS OF THE 
JESUITS and CONFESSIONS TO 
A PRIEST 

Both books are by Thomas E. Leyden, Evan- 
gelist, a converted Catholic. A warning to 
America. Contains the Jesuit oath. Paper cov- 
ert; price for the two books, 30 cents. 

DIVORCE AND REMARRIAGE 

By Elder I. J. Rosenberger. An appeal for 
reform in our marriage laws. Paper cover, 48 
pages, price, 5 cents. 

GURY'S DOCTRINES OF THE 
JESUITS— English Edition. 
Translated from the Latin into the French by 
M. Paul Bert, member of the Chamber of Dep- 
uties and Professor at the Faculty of Sciences. 
"The Doctrines of the Jesniits, translated into 
French by M. Paul Bert, caused the expulsion 
of the Jesuits from France." — Lequere. Paper 
cover; 612 pages, price, 50 cents. 



THE OPEN CONFESSION. 

By Rev. Dr. James M. Gray, Dean of The 
Moody Bible Institute. An address steno- 
graphically reported for the National Christian 
Association at its Annual Meeting, April 8, 1910. 

The relation of the Christian, and especially 
the Christian minister, to the secret oath-bound 
lodge. 

A Personal Testimony. — Three things that 
kept Dr. Gray from joining a lodge. 

Attacking Principles, Not Persons.— This is 
within our guaranteed constitutienal rights and 
is of fundamental importance. 

Describing a Mighty Adversary. — Not merely 
an evil influence, but a personal spiritual being 
at the head of a great Kingdom of beings like 
himself. And what this Enemy can do and is 
doing. 

A New Vision of the Lodge System.— Showing 
that it is iHTily contributing to the culminating 
sin of the present age. 

16 pages, envelope size, postpaid, 5 cents a 
copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Historical Sketch ; How the Business is Man- 
aged ; Publications; Its Work and Its Workers; 
Co-operating Organizations ; What Is Accom- 
plished. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
pnokasro of 25 for 25 cents. 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS. 

These consist of 20 different tracts, envelope 
size, of from four to sixteen pages each. Some 
.of them are: Why I Left the Rebekah Lodge. 
Col. Geo. R. Clark, seceder, on Why I Left tht 
Masons. Experience of Stephen Merritt, the 
Evangelist. Graciously Delivered from Seven 
Secret Societies. The Church and the Lodge. 
Baptist Testimonies. Lodge Religion. The 
"Good Man" Argument, Masonic Obligations. 
Catechism of Oddfellowship. Oddfellowship a 
Religious Institution. Why Do Men Remain 
Oddfellows? The Worship of Secret Societies 
Offered to Satan. Sketch of National Christian 
Association. Two Nights in a Lodge Room. 
The Secret Foe of the Sabbath. How to Save 
Christians from Ledges. Lodge Burial Services. 
Ought Christians to Hold Membership in In- 
surance Lodges? Ethics of Marriage and Home 
Life. Washington, What Kind of a Freemason 
Was He? College Fraternities. Fraternities in 
State Schools. For Women Who Think — Wom- 
en's Lodges. The Patriot and the Lodge. 
Each, 2 cents; an assortment, 25 cents. 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
850 W. Madison St. CHICAGO, ILL. 



WOODMEN OF THE WORLD 

By BENJAMIN M. HOLT 

The author, Mr. B. M. Holt, was for many years a lodge member. He resigned his lodge- 
connection in all due form on account of scruples of conscience; he was not dropped on account 
of delinquency, but voluntarily resigned and received his regular "letter of -dimission." 

The present treatise, which concerns itself with the Woodmen of the World in particular, 
•hows almost exclusively from quotations of prominent Woodm.en, official publications, supply 
houses, and others, what the Woodmen teach and do, and points out wherein their teachings and 
practises disagree with Christian principles. The little booklet is sure to be of inestimable value 
In the hands of pastors and others that have occasion to warn a Christian brother against 
Joining a lodge, and should be available also in persuading those who have already taken this 
step, to leave the lodge. 

The little paper-covered book comprises 72 pages, size 5x7%. It contains four Illustrations of 
secret society paraphernalia. The list price Is 25 cents, postpaid. 

Address NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 850 W. Madison St, Chicago 



iNoxice w» pieaaersj — wneii you nnisii reaaiiig inia imi^it.:e.iiiKi piuu^i a, j.-v;oiil suaiiip vu tixio iiwuvo, uiao^u oauio 
my postal «fnployee, and it will be placed in the hands of 
Lddress. A. S. BURLESON, Postmaster General. 



our soldiers or sailors at the front. No -wrapptag. No 




mim 



Vol. L, 



CHICAGO, NOVEMBER, 1917 



Number 7 







0ioc thanks unto the Cord: for be \$ aood 
for bl$ mercy endurctb for ever. 

gice thanks unto the Goa of godst for his 
mercy endureih for eoer. 

dive thanks to the Cord of lords: for his 
mercy endureth for ei^er, 

to him who alone doeth great wonders: for 
his mercy endureth for ever. 

Cet the redeemed of the Cord say so, whom he 
hath redeemed frcm the hand of the enemy; and 
gathered them out of the lands, from the east, 
and frcm the west, from the north, and frcm the 
south. 

Oh that men would t^ralse the Cord for his 
goodness and for his wonderful works to the chil- 
dren of men! 

Tor he satisfieth the longing soul, and filleth 
the hungry soul with goodness. 

Hnd let them sacrifice the sacrifices of thanks- 
giving, and declare his works with reioicing. 

Cet them exalt him also in the congregation of 
the people, and praise hin in the assembly of the 
elders. 

give thanks unto the Cord, for he is good: 
for his mercy endureth for ever. 

—Selections from Psalms CXXXVI and CVII. 




OFFICIAU ORCr^N, 
lOCENTJ" ACOPY 



NATIONAL CHRIJTIAN 
EJTABLIJHED I86S 



AJJOCIATION 

1.00 AYEAR 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

PubUshed Montlily by the National Christian 
Association. 



JAMES EDWIN PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor. 
850 West Madison Street, Chicago. 



.^ TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 
PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three 
months, on trial, twenty-five cents; single 
copies, ten cents. 
PRESENTATION COPIES— Many persons sub- 
scribe for tjhe Christian Cynosure to be sent 
to FRIENDS. In such cases, if we are advised 
that a subscription is a present and not regu- 
larly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at ex- 
piration, and to send no bill for the ensuing 
year. 

BUSINESS LETTERS Should be addressed to 
Wm. I. Phillips, Gen. Secy., at the above ad- 
dress. 
Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1^97, 

at the Post Office at Chicago, 111., under Act of 

March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS 



Thanksgiving — Selections from Psalms 

CVII and CXXXVI Cover 

Milton's Prayer of Patience, poem 193 

The Human Leopard Society t— Gospel 
Messenger 193 

Girls Have Free-for-All Fight 194 

M. W. A. Certificates of Enlisted Men 
Invalid — The Modern Woodman 194 

White Rats Lose $200,000 — Chicago 
Tribune 194 

There Ain't No Sich Animal 194 

A Word to Our Soldier Friends 195 

Enlisted Men Not Eligible in M. W. A... 197 
The Devil's "If," by Prof. J. R. Millin. ... 197 
Railroad Brotherhoods to Make New De- 
mand — Chicago Tribune 198 

Martin Luther and Secret Orders, by Rev. 

Martin L. Wagner 199 

Martin Luther Received in the Cotta 

Home, illustration 200 

British Labor Seeks Industrial Control — 

Chicago Herald 201 

Eraployers' Plan for Industrial Peace — 

Chicago Daily News 205 

An Acrostic, by John S. White 207 

A Prophet's Voict— The Free Methodist. 207 

"Ten Minutes of Fiction" 208 

Adams, John Quincy, Letters of.. 209 



Obituary: Rev. E. P. Woodward. 213 

Editorial : 

Labor Unrest 211 

The Same Old Tune 211 

The Seventeenth Year 212 

If the Blind Lead 213 

A. Blighted Tree 213 

News of Our Work: 

Secretary PhilHps' Letter 214 

Masonic Facts vs. Dr. Peters' Fictions.. 215 
From the West Coast, by Rev. B. E. 

Bergeson 216 

Eastern Secretary's Report, Rev. W. B, 

Stoddard ' 217 

"Lizzie Woods' Letter" 218 

Southern Agent's Letter, Rev. F. J. Da- 
vidson .220 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 
GENERAL OFFICERS. 

President Rev. D. S. Warner; vice- 
president, Rev. John F. Heemstra; re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. N. E. Kellogg; 
secretary-treasurer, Wm. I. Phillips. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

George W. Bond, C. A. Blanchard, G. 
J. Haan, H. A. Fischer, Jr., Thonuis C 
McKnight, D. S. Warner, P. A. Kit- 
tilsby, M. P. F. Doermann, A. H. Lea- 
man, George Slager and Wm. M. Trap. 



LECTURERS. 

Those desiring lectures or addresses 
may write to any of the speakers named 
below: 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, 3118 Fourteenth 
St, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, 221 College 
Ave., Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. F. J. Davidson, 2512 14th St., 
New Orleans, La. 

Prof. Moses H. Clemens, Box 96, 
Ubee, Ind. 

Rev. C. G. Fait, Ellendale, N, D. 

Rev. Philemon Beck, Graftcm, Calif. 

Bd. G. B. Crockett. Dermott, Ai^. 



m 



Vol. L, No. 7. 



CHICAGO 



November, 1917 



There is none 
other Name 
under heaven, 
given among 
men, whereby 
we must be 
saved. 

—Acts 4:12 



CHRISTIAN 

CYNOSURE 



Jesus answered 
him: I spake 
openly to the 
world, and in 
secret have I 
said nothing, 
—John 18:20 



MILTON'S PRAYER OF PATIENCE. 

I am old and blind ; 

Men point at me as smitten by God's 
frown ; 
Afflicted and deserted of my kind, 

Yet am I not cast down. 



I am weak, yet strong; 

I murmur not that I no longer see ; 
Poor, old and helpless, I the more be- 
long, 

Father, Supreme, to Thee. 

All merciful One, 

When men are farthest, then art Thou 
most near ; 
When friends pass by, my weakness to 

shun, 
Thy chariot I hear. 

Thy glorious face 

Is leaning towards me, and its holy 

Shines in upon my lonely dwelling 
place, — 
And there is no more night. 

On my bended knee 

I recognize Thy purpose, clearly 
shown ; 
My vision Thou hast dimm'd that I may 
see 
Thee — Thyself alone. 



I have naught to fear ; 

This darkness is the shadow of Thy 
wings ; 
Beneath it I am almost sacred, — here 

Can come no evil things. 



Oh, I seem to stand 

Trembling, where foot of mortal ne'er 
hath been. 
Wrapped in that radiance from the sin- 
less land 
Which eye hath never seen. 

Visions come and go. 

Shapes of resplendent beauty 'round 
me throng; 
From angel-lips I seem to hear the flow 

Of soft and holy song.- 

In a purer clime. 

My being fills with rapture, — waves of 
thought 
Roll in upon my spirit — strains sub- 
lime 
Break over me unsought. 

Give me now my lyre ; 

I feel the stirrings of a gift divine; 
Within my bosom glows unearthly fire 

Lit by no skill of mine. 



THE HUMAN LEOPARD SOCIETY. 

A prominent British writer, Sir \\\\- 
liam Brandford Griffith, ascribes many 
of the cruel and abhorrent practices of 
African cannibals- to a secret order, — 
"The Human Leopard Society," — that, 
for generations, has been in existence. 
The unsuspecting victim, wholly uncon- 
scious of his impending fate, is slain by 
a member of this secret order under most 
harrowing circumstances. The assail- 
ant is garbed in a leopard's skin, and his 
hands and feet are armed with sharp 
iron claws which quickly perform their 
allotted task. British officials have been 
endeavoring for years to root out the 
sinister association, whose onlv object 



194 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



is murder, in order that a perverted ap- 
petite for human flesh may be gratified. 
At first it had been thought that proper 
education of the natives might bring 
about a change for the better, but later 
on it was generally admitted that only 
the religion of Jesus Christ can trans- 
form the perverted heart. While these 
members of the "Human Leopard So- 
ciety" are hard to reach, because their 
identity is hidden behind a veil of se- 
crecy, the arrow of Divine truth has here 
and there found entrance into their 
heart, and brought conviction. With love 
as a ruling principle, works of darkness 
can no longer prevail. What the power 
of British law could not do, has been 
wrought by the potent, though silent, 
influence of the Gospel. — Gospel Mes- 
senger. 



GIRLS HAVE FREE-FOR-ALL FIGHT. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa., Oct. 4. — Several stu- 
dents were badly beaten in a free-for-all 
fight which followed an attempt to haze 
members of the freshmen class by a 
group of Bryn Mawr college sophomores 
to-day. 

The cries of the girls, who were pull- 
ing each other's hair and rolling around 
in the street, attracted reinforcements to 
both classes. Freshmen in automobiles 
overpowered the sophomores and res- 
cued their classmates. Before the police 
arrived the sophomores also managed to 
gain their motor cars and escape. 

Hazing has been a feature of the open- 
ing week of the school, of which Miss 
Helen Taft, daughter of former Presi- 
dent Taft, is dean. To-day's affair, 
which took place in the center of the 
town, was reported to the college author- 
ities. — Chicago Tribune, Oct. 5, 1917. 



M. W. A. CERTIFICATES OF EN- 
LISTED MEN INVALID. 

The certificates of members who lose 
their lives while engaged in the naval or 
military service during the present war, 
can not be paid from any present surplus 
in the benefit fund. The Head Camp 
by-laws voids certificates of all who thus 
lose their lives. In order to overcome 
this by-law, the delegates to the Chicago 
Head Camp, by unanimous vote, passed 
the patriotic fund assessment by-law. 
From this patriotic fund all deceased 



soldiers' certificates are to be paid. Un- 
der the Illinois laws, this by-law is to be 
referred to a referendum vote for rati- 
fication at the first meeting of the local 
camps in October. If the action of the 
Head Camp is not sustained, then the 
fund can not be raised and these certifi- 
cates must remain unpaid, awaiting ac- 
tion by the next Head Camp, which will 
meet in June, 1921. Thus, not for four 
years at least, the beneficiaries of our 
Woodmen who lay down their lives for 
their country, could be paid. We can 
not believe a majority of our loyal mem- 
bers will vote against this just, as well 
as patriotic by-law. The law remains in 
full force and effect anyway until after 
the referendum vote is taken. — The 
Modern Woodman, October, 1917. 



WHITE RATS LOSE $200,000. 
New York, Oct. 4. — That $200,000 of 
the funds of the White Rats Actors' 
union was misappropriated by officers of 
the organization is charged by Flarry De 
Veaux, a former member, at present 
head of the Actors' International union, 
in an affidavit filed in the Supreme court 
to-day. — Chicago Tribune, Oct. 5, 1917. 



THERE AIN'T NO SICH ANIMAL. 

(From the American Press.) 
Wanted — To correspond with a ma- 
chinist-operater who is also a good print- 
er, a bachelor and preferably a Mason 
and sportsman ; must be a southerner, a 
Democrat, and a man of good morals 
and refinement. — "Line - o - Type or 
Two," Chicago Tribune. 

INJURED WHILE AT WORK. 

A Red Row highbrow got drunk and 
undertook to whip his wife, but she 
proved the better man of the two, and 
used a broom handle on him so effect- 
i\ely that he had to have a dactor sew 
up the wounds. Then he put in a claim 
to his beneficial society, alleging that he 
had been injured while at work, and col- 
lected it. — The Clean Commonzvealth. 



Zion's Watchman in a ''full salva- 
tion," ''separate from the world," un- 
denominational, non-sectarian religious 
weekly paper, Write for free sample 
copy. Address L. H. Higley, Publisher, 
Butler, Ind. 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



195 



mill 



B A WORD TO OUR g 
■ SOLDIER FRIENDS M 



Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiirfi 
A letter is lying- on the desk of the 
writer from a soldier now in camp. In 
this letter, among other things, he says, 
"I am satisfied that the army either makes 
or wrecks a man.'' Every soldier comes 
to feel that this is true before he has been 
very long in camp. If it is true that army 
life makes or wrecks a man, it is to the in- 
terest of us all to do everything- which 
looks toward the making rather than the 
wrecking. A thoughtful man who is in the 
army or who has relatives or friends in 
the army, should do what in him lies to 
secure the moral character O'f the men in 
camp. Failure in moral life is always a 
tragedy which can never be a solitary 
thing. No man lives to himself. The 
sinner never dies alone. We oug'ht there- 
fore to avail ourselves of every means by 
which we may hold the good we have 
and gain the good we lack. No man is 
so strong that he can neglect any means 
for doing or receiving good. 

The Testament League Among 
English Soldiers 

The Pocket Testament League has 
already reached assured success. Over 
four hundred thousand English soldiers 
have signed the pledge to carry the 
Pocket Testament with them and to read 
at least a chapter in it each day. The 
movement is already beginning in our 
own camps and will no doubt enroll as 
many men as in England. The testimony 
of the soldiers is that their Testaments 
have been a comfort as well as a safe- 
guard, a safeguard as well as a comfort. 
Mr. W. B. Jacobs said once in a public 
address that when he enlisted at the be- 
ginning of the Civil War he made up his 
mind that he would live in the army as 
clean and pure a life as he expected his 
wife to live at home. He continued, 'T 
was four years in the army and God so 
kept me that I did not say or do any- 
thing that would have made me blush if 
the whole world had looked on." 



This glorious testimony borne by this 
wonderful man may be the experience of 
every one of gur soldier friends who read 
these words if he will make it so. While 
it is true that the temptations of the 
army life are strong and many, yet, it is 
also true that many men have lived as 
strong and powerful and beautiful army 
lives as did the late Mr. W. B. Jacobs. 

"Shall I Join Some Lodge?" 

When the Civil War began there 
were about two hundred thousand Free- 
masons in our country. When it closed 
there were over four hundred thousand. 
The question naturally arises, How did 
there come to be so large an increase in 
so short a time? Those of us who were 
then alive understood perfectly how it 
occurred. From ocean to ocean men 
joining the army were told that if they 
would join the Freemasons they would 
secure favors from the enemy and thou- 
sands united with them or some other 
lodge with this end in. view. It is diffi- 
cult if not impossible to see how a sol- 
dier can receive favors from the enemy 
without at least the beginning of treason 
in his own heart. Men in an army do not 
receive favors without returning them to 
those of the opposite side. One does not 
easily understand how such an attitude 
of mind is consistent with fidelit}^ to the 
military oath. War is' serious business 
and if groups of men on one side are 
looking for favors from groups of men 
on the other side it is easy to see how 
national disaster may result. 

Men or Sheep 

Still further, temporal advantages 
may be purchased at too high a price. 
If soldiers who are also lodge men could 
receive favors from antagonists and at 
the same time remain loyal citizens of 
their country, they might be seriously 
injured, if the receiving of said favors 
involved treason to the King of Kings. 
Our friends who read this ought not only 
to be true to themselves but to God. 
Every young soldier who is urged to join 
some lodge, as such young men are likely 
to be, ought therefore to rememl^er a few 
self-evident truths. 

In the first place no wise man, who 
wishes to be a good man, will identify 



196 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



himself with an organization unless he 
knows what it is. No wise man will 
swear an oath the nature of which he does 
not clearly understand. No man has the 
moral right to swear such an oath. One 
who thus swears to do what he knows 
not w4iat, may find himself involved in 
any shame or crime. 

In the second place, no man who is 
loyal to Jesus Christ will unite with an 
organization without seeking to know 
what the relation of the organization is 
to the Saviour whom he professes to love 
and serve. Secret societies are con- 
structed on the plan of universal mem- 
bership. Jew and Gentile, Pagan and 
Christian, all are invited, and if they will 
come are welcomed. This is not the uni- 
versal truth but it is a general one and 
will be found to be the fact regarding all 
the older and larger orders. These secret 
organizations are religious in character, 
have prayers, solemn addresses, hymns 
and many of them Scripture readings. 
But throughout Christ's name is care- 
fully excluded or if mentioned is men- 
tioned in such a way as to be no hin- 
drance to the reception of those who do 
not regard Him as the Saviour of the 
world. 

How can a Christian man unite with 
an organization which excludes the name 
of Jesus Christ? The fact that pro- 
fessed Christians, even some ministers, 
do this is neither an explanation or a 
justification. Church members have 
owned slaves, have gambled and in a 
thousand ways dishonored the Saviour 
whose name they have professed. When 
a man becomes a Christian he does not 
agree to follow other Christians, but 
Jesus Christ. It is impossible to follow 
Jesus Christ into a secret lodge. In John 
18:20 Jesus himself tells us that He never 
went into such a place. A Christian sol- 
dier therefore should carefully avoid that 
which Jesus Christ himself does not by 
His example or word recommend. 

Xo doubt many soldiers may read 
these words who are not now confessed 
Christians. They may feel that the argu- 
ment is conclusive for Christian men but 
that they are free. Such men should 
remember that confessing onessel'f a 
Christian is a recognition of an obligation, 
but does not itself constitute it. The 



reason why one should be a Christian is 
because he is in God's world, is God's 
creation and is under obligation to serve 
God. No man is under obligation to be 
a Christian primarily because he has 
united with the cburch. The recognition 
of his obligation may intensify it but 
surely it does not create it. 

An Incident in Navy 

A Chaplain in the navy told the writer 
last week that he was preaching recently 
to seven or eight hundred men on a war- 
ship. He said that he remarked to them 
that it was their duty to be Christians 
and it was not only their duty but their 
privilege ; that they had the opportunity 
and that so many of them as were willing 
to take Christ as their Saviour and con- 
fess Him before the world might come 
forward. He said that seventy-one of 
those young- men immediately marched 
forward before all their comrades and 
avowed them;selves believers in Christ. 
That is the way men ought to do. That 
is the way men who read these words 
should do. There are thousands of per- 
sons who know their dut}^ and who ought 
to be ready to take it up promptly who 
linger and wait. Now we submit to all 
our soldier friends that these young men 
simply acted the part of men. They knew 
what they ought to do and they did it. 
Why cannot a multitude of those who 
read these words follow their example? 

There is not one man who will take 
this bit of paper in his hand that does 
not know in his heart — whether he con- 
fesses himself a Christian or not — that he 
rightfully belongs to God. He knows 
that Jesus Christ did come into this world 
to save sinners, and if he knows himself 
to be a sinner he has a chance to be saved, 
and ought to be saved. In any event he 
ought not to yoke himself up with godless 
men in fraternal associations where salva- 
tion will be difficult, if not impossible. 

Of course the dif^culty which arises 
in the minds of men comes from the fact 
that some ministers and religious leaders 
are lodge people, but this is not a strange 
thing, as we have already said. If men are 
going to follow men there is no meanness 
into which they may not fall. Men are 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



197 



never commanded to follow men execpt 
as men follow Christ. Men do not be- 
long to men, not even to themselves. 
They belong to God, and God has the 
power and the disposition to enforce his 
claim. Men can deny it or neglect it, 
but in the end they will be compelled to 
admit it. Every knee is to bow and 
every tongue is to confess to God. It 
is better that this be done cheerfully, 
thankfully, rejoicingly, promptly, than 
to neglect it until it has to be the sub- 
mission of a conquered rebel. 

Let us therefore urge upon our sol- 
dier friends two things : first, to confess 
that they belong to God; and second, to 
avoid all those things which "dishonor 
him. A loving child has an interest in 
the honor of his father. 

National Christiax Association. 

October 6, 1917. 

850 West Madison Street, 

Chicag^o, Illinois. 



ENLISTED MEN NOT ELIGIBLE IN 
M. W. A. 

There seems to be some misunder- 
standing as to admission to membership 
of men already in military or naval serv- 
ice. \Miile Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica feels it a duty to protect members 
who are called to the colors, it can not 
undertake to insure men already enlisted. 
Head Consul Talbot has sent out the fol- 
lowing : 

You are advised that the Executive Coun- 
cil of the Society, by resolution adopted, de- 
cided that until otherwise ordered no person 
can be admitted to beneficial membership in 
the Society, who, as a result of voluntary en- 
listment, or draft, or conscription is in the 
military or naval service of the United States 
or Canada, and you are further advised that 
"service" in the army or navy within the 
meaning of the resolution adopted by the 
Executive Council commences when a person 
is examined and accepted by' the government 
for either military or naval service. 

You will therefore understand that applica- 
tions arc not to be accepted from persons 
who have been examined and accepted by 
the government for service in either the army 
or navy. 

You are also advised that where a benefit 
certificate has been issued to a person, who, 
since his application was received and acted 
upon, has been examined and accepted by the 
government for army or naval service, such 
certificate should not be delivered to such 
person, but should be returned to the Head 
Clerk of the Society at Rock Island, 111. — 
The Modern Woodmen, October, 1917. 



THE DEVIL'S "IF." 

BY PROF. J. R. MILLIX, KXOXVILLE COL- 
LEGE. 

"All these things will I give thee," 
cries Satan to Jesus, "if thou wilt fall 
down and worship me !" The ready an- 
swer of Jesus to this insulting proposi- 
tion is a sword thrust — 'Tt is written." 
Hear: "Get thee hence!" And Satan 
got himself hence. 

"All this business, all this social stand- 
ing, all this political preferment, will I 
give you," cries Satan to men, "if you 
will join the ^Masonic lodge or the Odd- 
Fellows lodge, — both of which exclude 
by their laws the name of Christ from 
their rituals or worship, — and thus fall 
down and worship me l" And what is the 
answer to this insulting proposition? 
Have men learned by the example of 
Jesus how to resist the Devil that he 
may flee from them ? \\'hat a spectacle ! 
Multitudes, including thousands upon 
thousands of church members, and not 
a few preachers too, in effect answer this 
appeal of Satan. "It's a" bargain, it's a 
bargain!" All Freemasons and Odd- 
Fellows, as such, worship at Cain's blood- 
less altar, that is, they worship Satan. 

Some one protests ? Let him read John 
14:6, and explain it. Be not deceived: 
God is not fooled ! 

And yet men wonder what is the mat- 
ter with the church, wonder why the 
church has so little power, wonder why 
church attendance is falling ofif ! Why 
should men take any account of the 
church when they can arrive at "the 
Grand Lodge above" by the easy lodge 
route ? Answer, ye who can ! Oh for 
an Ehjah to cry again. "If the Lord be 
God, follow him; but if Baal, then fol- 
low him." (i Kings 18:21.) Oh, for an- 
other Paul to cry, "If any man preach 
any other gospel unto you than that ye 
have received let him be accursed." 
(Gal. I :6-io.) 

Knoxville, Tennessee. 



"SMALL" AMOUNT OF GRAIN USED 
BY BREWERS. 

The Xew York Tribune is authority 
for the following figures: 

From the grain made into whiskey and 
beer last year : 

4,000,000 people could have been sup- 
plied with rye bread for 100 days. 



19S 



CHRISTIAN CYXOSl'RE. 



Xovenil^er, 191] 



56,000.000 people could have been 
supplied with corn meal for 100 days. 

16.000.000 people could have been sup- 
plied with rice for 100 days. 

loo.oco.ooo people could have been 
supplied with 18 pounds of rice each. 

100.000.000 people could have been 
supplied with one gallon of molasses 
each. 

208.200.oco loaves of bread could have 
been made from the rve. 



ers in the northeastern part of the United 
States and eastern Canada decided here 
to-day to recommend to their unions 
that they demand from their employers 
wage increases of not less than 20 per 
cent. The workers involved are train- 
men, conductors, baggagemen, brake- 
men, and yardmen on lines east of Chi- 
cago and north of the Potomac river. 

The vote in favor of the demand for 
increased pay was unanimous on the part 




RAILROAD BROTHERHOODS TO 
MAKE NEW DEMAND. 

Xew York. Oct. 10. — The '"big four"" 
railroad brotherhoods, which last year 
forced the enactment of the Adamson 
law by which all freight men got an in- 
crease of 2C per cent in wages, are now 
preparing to demand an increase esti- 
mated around 2^ per cent in wages for 
all passenger men employed on roads 
east of Chicago and north of the Poto- 
mac river, according to advices received 
in well informed quarters. — Chicago 
Tribune. Oct. 11. 1917. 

Ottawa. Out.. Oct. 18. — Representa- 
tives of 200.C00 organized railroad work- 



of 104 chairmen of the Brotherhood of 
Railroad Trainmen and the Order of 
Railway Conductor-, who have been in 
session here for three days. 

The question will be submitted to a 
referendum of the members of the 
brotherhoods, and if their vote is affirm- 
ative negotiations with the railroad com- 
panies will be begun. 

"Tn view of the bounding cost of liv- 
ing."" ^Ir. Lee declared, "the men feel 
they are entitled to more money and 
thev intend to press their demands for 
the 20 per cent increase." — Chicago Tri- 
bune, Oct. 19, 1917. 



Xovembe- 



CKRIST lAX CYXOSURE. 



:99 



MARTIN LUTHER AND SECRET 
ORDERS. 

BY RE\-. MARTI X L. WAGNER, DAYTOX, 
OHIO. 

In this quadricentennial year of the 
Reformation — when the principles of 
that mighty movement so feariessly 
championed by its moving spirit, ^lartin 
Luther, came prominently to the front, 
and in the celebration of which the pur- 
pose is not only to commemorate the 
achievements of the sixteenth centur\-, 
but to hasten the transformation of the 
twentieth — it may not be amiss to in- 
quire. What was Luther's attitude to- 
ward secret oath-bound orders ? or rather 
Did Luther regard the principles upon 
which they are founded, and which they 
advocate and defend, as necessars^ and 
helpful to the Christian life? 
Masons Claim Luther. 
Eminent Freemasons have claimed IMar- 
tin Luther as a member of their craft, 
notwithstanding the fact that the Refor- 
mation which he inaugurated began two 
centuries before Freemasonry, the father 
of present day secret orders, took or- 
ganic forms. This claim is in line with 
others made by this fratemit\": that not 
onlv Luther, but the Saints John. Jesus 
Qirist. Solomon, Ximrod. Enoch, and 
even Adam were Freemasons. It claims 
and appropriates about ever\-thing that 
makes the ignorant and vulgar stare, or 
adds color of greatness and a flavor of 
antiquit\- to the fratemirr. 

Luther was not a Freemason. His 
principles were such that it would have 
been impossible for him to hold member- 
ship in any such f ratemit}-. His big hon- 
est heart forbade hypocrisy such as is 
involved in an attempt to ser\-e Girist 
and Belial. 

It is said that. Alexander the Great, 
when he visited Diogenes, the eccentric 
Grecian philosopher, asked: 'Ts there 
an)-thing that I can do for you?"' to 
which Diogenes replied, '*Yes, you 
can remove yourself from between 
me and the sun." Long before Luther's 
day. the papacy had interposed itself be- 
tween the sinner and the Sun of Right- 
eousness. With its orders, ordinances, 
penances, pilgrimages, purgators", priests, 
monks, nims. cardinals, indulgences, in- 
quisitions, oaths, vows, saints, satisfac- 
tions, masses, mummeries, and what not. 



it shut out the true light, and left the 
poor sinners living in their dark, gloomy 
cells, painfully performing their religion 
of works, and clad in the filthy rags of 
selfrighteousness. In their ignorance 
and superstition, bound in abject servi- 
tude to these human imposed obligations, 
they groped in moral and spiritual dark- 
ness, ever seeking but never coming to 
the true Light. Jesus Christ. Luther 
himself had had this experience, and 
for years sought peace of mind and as- 
surance of forgiveness, in endeavoring 
to fulfill all the vows and obligations he 
had taken. He knew the secrets of his 
order but he did not know that the secret 
of the Lord is with them that fear him. 

Eventually Luther discovered the Sun 
of Righteousness, shining forth in all its 
beautv, warmth and life giving power. 
He found it to be Jesus Christ, who re- 
deemed him, a lost and condemned crea- 
ture, from sin, death and from thr ; er 
of the Devil — not with silver :-.:. I ^ '.i. 
but with his holy and precious blood, his 
innocent sufferings and death. And why ? 
In order that he might be Christ's and 
live under him in his kingdom, and serve 
him in innocence, righteousness, and in 
the blessedness of full forgiveness. 
Luther discmered the long forgotten and 
long suppressed truth, that Jesus Christ 
is the Way. and the Truth and the Life. 
and that no man can come imto the 
Father, but by Him. and that all those 
who endeavor to climb in some other 
way are thieves and robbers. 
Luthers Great Work. 

If I were : - :■. . :' vords 

the work tha: ^ i: i I :.■'.: say 

:ha: i: consists i ::: :::s: He compelled 
:::-r :zhcy, wiiii aii its ap'"-^*:^:inees. to 
^t: ut from between ma:: > Re- 

deemer, the S'.::: -: Righteo-isiiess. and 
let the Light f r :.. shine once more 
upon the now barren garden of the Lord. 
And as these clouds of superstiti-r. .vere 
removed, and the Light sho: 
Holy Spirit quickened those wi.. ..i . 
and received it, and a new spiritual life 
began to pulsate through ' orld. 

Luther, as the chief organ refor- 

mation, simply used the Bible, as the 
chief instrument by which the Church 
was reformed, and in order that the Sun 
of Righteousness might shine i*'" --- -^-y 
heart. he translated it into the .e 



200 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



of the people so that each one could hear 
the wonderful works of God. in the lan- 
guage in which he was born. 
Luther a Seceder. 
Under the compelling power of the 
truth of that \\'ord, Luther repudiated 
his order, and all the obligations it had 
imposed, and came forth into the full and 
free light of the Gospel, and thousands 
followed his example. He repudiated 



and the Sun of Righteousness. Cease 
interposing your oaths, your mummeries, 
your 'secret arts/' your work-righteous- 
ness, your refined and disguised heathen- 
ism, between the poor sinner seeking 
Light and the Sun of Righteousness, 
^^hose light alone can lighten every man 
that comes into the world. He is in the 
world but the world knows him not be- 
cause such systems as the secret lodge 




MARTIN LUTHER WHEX A SCHOOL BOY IN MAGDEBURG BEING INVITED INTO THE HOME OF THE 
COTTA FAMILY WITH WHOM HE SPENT MANY HA PPY HOURS. 



and boldly renounced every vow and ob- 
ligation not in harmony with his bap- 
tismal covenant. His conscience was 
bound by nothing else than God's Word. 
On that Word he stood immovable. In 
all this, his principles were diametrically 
opposed to the principles upon which the 
secret lodge system is built, and were he 
living to-day there is no doubt, but that 
he would hurl his invectives as vigor- 
ously against the will-worship, the work- 
righteousness, and the refined heathen- 
ism of the lodge, as he did against these 
very things in the papal system. 

The lodge often patronizingly asks : 
'Ts there anything I can do for you?" 
to which a true church of Christ should 
reply, "Yes, remove yourself and your 
useless lumber from between the sinner 



and the papacy interpose themselves be- 
tween him and man, and in the ensuing 
darkness, can not be comprehended." 
How Transform Christendom. 

If these principles of the Reformation 
which liberated so many thousands from 
the bonds of iniquity in that day, could be 
made vital in the conditions prevailing 
to-day not only in papal chris.endom, but 
also in lodge-ridden Christendom, for 
there is no essential difference between 
these two except in name, there would be 
such a transformation in the twentieth 
century that it would mark a new epoch 
in the world's history. 

The papacy is heathenized Christian- 
ity, and the secret lodge system is papal- 
ized heathenism. Pure protestantism of 
which Martin Luther is possibly the 



November, 1917 



CHRTSTIAX CYNOSURE. 



201 



greatest and most fearless exponent, is 
the relentless foe of each, because each 
interposes an insuperable barrier be- 
tween the sinner and his Savior, between' 
man and his God. 

Luther contended for the following 
principles, and the success of the Refor- 
mation is their vindication : An open 
Bible our only guide to Heaven ; private 
judgment our inalienable birthright, 
Christ and him crucified our only Savior ; 
true faith in the son of God our only 
availing righteousness. The papacy and 
the lodge system deny and repudiate 
these. There can be no doubt therefore, 
what Luther's attitude would be, were 
he alive to-dav. 



BRITISH LABOR SEEKS INDUS- 
TRIAL CONTROL. 



'Tf Ave could only get into our lives 
the true spirit of the ]vlan of Galilee, who 
suffered death on the cross that we might 
live, we could better interpret the beau- 
tiful lesson of fraternity in our beloved 
order.'' So confesses the G. M. of N. 
Dakota, in an article written for the June 
Odd Fellozv Review. Elsewhere, he also 
says: "We are often accused of being 
narrow and selfish ; which we cannot al- 
ways controvert, because it may be to 
some extent true. . . . Had the Good 
Samaritan acted upon the principle that 
he, only, was worthy of true fraternal 
help, who belonged to the same nation- 
ality, or secret society, the beautiful ex- 
ample of true fraternahsm would never 
have been enacted." 

This grand master feels a sense of de- 
ficiency in the membership, and perhaps 
catches a glimpse of the same lack in 
their organization itself. Yet he labors 
to induce the members to make an in- 
terpretation which he believes adequate 
to rectify the condition which is deplored. 
Nevertheless, "That Avhich is crooked 
cannot be made straight ; and that which 
is wanting: cannot be numbered." 



"Neither Grant nor Lee were mem- 
bers of the fraternity, but they would 
have made good Masons," says the Ma- 
sonic Chronicler. 

In these times when it has become a 
^^lasonic habit to claim everyone and 
everything for IMasonry, it is worth 
noting when a lodge periodical lapses 
into the truth. W^ congratulate the 
Chronicler. 



Revolutionary Scheme of the Reconstruc- 
tion Committee of the Cabinet. 

Glasgow, Scotland, June 2. — It seems 
clear now that while there is a good deal 
of labor unrest that would have come to 
a head but for war conditions, the Scot- 
tish industrial areas are a stage farther 
advanced in their knowledge of the re- 
lations of industry to the war than are 
those of England. This has been well 
illustrated by refusal of the men of the 
Clyde shipbuilding and engineering dis- 
trict to strike, even though they ad- 
mitted frankly that they shared in the 
grievances of which their English fel- 
low workers complained, and objected 
just as strongly to the "injustices" which 
had caused cessation of work in Eng- 
land. But they drew the line at going 
out on strike. 

A certain number of "missionaries'' 
from the English districts came to the 
Clyde and tried to stir' up strike senti- 
ment. They saw the men at the works 
gates, interviewed the shop stewards 
and endeavored to get them to carry on 
the propaganda inside the shipyards and 
engineering shops. All this was, of 
course, contrary to the official policy of 
the trade unions, which co-operate with 
the government and keep their members 
at work all the time. They have agree- 
ments with the government to this efifect, 
and they always endeavor to keep these 
agreements, and to settle disputes by 
negotiation, through the war time ma- 
chinery which has been set up for that 
purpose. But they have frequently 
found it difficult to get their members 
to fall into line. 

Not for Unauthorized Strike. 

Li this case engineers in the midlands 
of England and in London stopped work 
without the authority of their trade 
unions, and appealed to those of the 
Clyde and the northeast coast of Eng- 
land to join them. But neither of the 
great shipbuilding districts responded. 
The men in these districts have had about 
enough of unauthorized strikes against 
the orders of their own unions and 
against the instructions of the govern- 
ment, and will not have any more dur- 
ing the war if they can help it. 



202 



CHRTSTIAX CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



In the first year or so of the war the 
shipbuilding and marine engineering 
men were the most difficult to manage 
of all the many sections of industrial 
operatives, and for a time the Clyde was 
a hotbed of labor troubles. Clyde op- 
eratives, however, have reached a posi- 
tion in which they are very chary about 
striking, and have practically come to 
the conclusion that it is their best plan, 
not only from the point of view of pa- 
triotism and the war, but from that of 
labor policy, to concentrate wholly on the 
war. and save up their agitating energy 
for the after war period, when many 
industrial problems will have to be 
threshed out. 

It is now the turn of the men of the 
English midlands and of London to have 
pointed at them the finger of reproach 
and to be told that they were squabbling 
with their employers and with the gov- 
ernment while their brothers at the front 
were earnestly demanding the munitions 
of war which they should have been 
making. \Mien the Clyde men were on 
strike they were villified in unmeasured 
terms by English critics who did not 
know the district, and did not under- 
stand the circumstances. Xow these 
critics find Cjuite as reprehensible sub- 
jects for their villification on their own 
side of the border, and that at a much 
later stage of the war. 

Unskilled Labor Unwelcome. 

But it must not be understood that 
the Scots do not sympathize fully with 
the English. They all have common 
grievances and the Clyde men recog- 
nized these even sooner than did the 
men of England. Their first and still 
one of their principal grievances con- 
sists in what is generally known as "di- 
lution of labor." The most serious war- 
time strikes in the west of Scotland were 
caused by this. The government de- 
cided that in order to increase the man 
power of the country unskilled men and 
women must be introduced into engi- 
neering works. These must be trained 
to take the places of full fledged trades- 
men, and so relieve such men for more 
important work, or for supervising 
groups of untrained. The skilled men 
objected strongly to the introduction of 
these "dilutees" because they feared that 
it would be easier to let them into the 



works than to get them out again. So 
there were strikes. Ultimately, after 
the government had taken such strong 
measures as the deporting to the east of 
Scotland of the strike leaders and in- 
citers, peace was made — of a kind. The 
men had been promised that after the 
war was over every "dilutee" would be 
taken out of the w^orks and they had to 
be content with that. 

Later there arose another grievance. 
A verbal promise had been given to the 
trade unions that dilution would be in- 
troduced only into works wdiere muni- 
tions of war were being made. In all 
private establishments the old ways 
would continue undisturbed. But the 
time came — as it had to come — when the 
government found itself compelled to 
get at the skilled men in private plants. 
They required the services of these men 
for war work, and in order to get them 
they would have to replace them by semi- 
skilled and unskilled men and women. 
In short, they were compelled by circum- 
stances over which they had no control 
to extend dilution to private work. 
Scots Were Not Stirred. 

The English engineers at once rose up 
in arms, and came out on strike because 
of the "breach of faith." The Clyde 
men, although they had fought against 
dilution strenuously, and recognized the 
"breach of faith" just as well, were not 
aft'ected very much, because there are 
now very few^ private works in the w^est 
of Scotland. All are on munitions, one 
wa}^ or another. Besides, they recog- 
nized that the departure was inevitable 
and, what was perhaps of more weight 
with them, the hopelessness of striking 
in the face of the common sentiments of 
all the country. 

Exemption Cards Called In. 

There was another grievance — that 
known as the withdrawal of the trade 
card system of military exemptions. 
Under this scheme the government gave 
a certain number of trade unions the 
privilege of granting to such of their 
members as were engaged on essential 
w^ar work a card which prevented the 
military authorities from calling them 
up for service in the army. The Clyde 
trade union officials declared that they 
had never abused this privilege in any 
wav, and that the militarv could not 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



203 



prove that they had given a card to one 
man who should not have been ex- 
empted. 

But the government decided that some 
means had to be found for getting at in- 
dividual men all over the country, and 
also that it was not fair to give some 
trade unions this privilege and withhold 
it from others. So they abolished the 
trade card scheme, and introduced in- 
stead a system under which the case of 
each individual man is considered by his 
employers and the military in the light 
of the work which he is doing, but is 
exempted or not exempted accordingly. 
The trade unions concerned — the engi- 
neers especially — were very much dis- 
pleased about this, and the English 
strikes were caused largely by the 
change. Still the Clyde men refused to 
stop work. 

Peace Is Truce Only. 
So there is peace meantime. But it is 
a peace which is not misunderstood by 
any of those who are in close touch with 
British labor movements. It is a peace 
dictated by the stern necessity of war, 
and by the knowledge that anything 
other than peace would be the worst 
possible policy for labor to adopt so 
long as the enemy without the gate is 
unconquered. What wnll happen when 
the war is over no one knows. Certain- 
ly there will be an industrial evolution 
(or perhaps revolution) such as there 
has never been in the past. For labor 
has found its feet, realized its strength, 
and discovered ho\v necessary it is to 
the country, and what an enormous 
amount of influence it can exert for the 
purpose of attaining its objects. There 
will be an enormous evolution of a 
strictly legitimate character. There will 
be agreement as to far reaching labor 
legislation and proposals which would 
have been called adsurdly socialistic a 
few years ago will be discussed quite 
seriously, even by the conservative ele- 
ments in politics. 

There is at present underlying all Brit- 
ish industry a movement of quite an- 
other character — one in favor of action 
by the workers independent of the trade 
unions, action wdiich will, say its advo- 
cates, bring about higher wages and 
better working conditions, not by re- 
peated applications, and by agitation and 



strikes, and arbitration, but by getting 
"control'' of industry. Labor, they say, 
must be represented, not only in parlia- 
ment and on all public bodies, but also 
on the boards of directors of all public 
companies, and it must have a direct say 
in the management of these companies.. 
This "control of industry" is the ideal 
at which labor is aiming. It is "syn- 
dicalism" under another name, and it 
is catching on with a far larger number 
of working men than will be apparent 
until after the war is over. — Chicago 
Daily N'cws, July 17, 191 7. 

Peace Reconstruction. 

One of the most interesting govern- 
mental bodies in existence today is the 
British reconstruction committee of the 
cabinet. Along many lines this commit- 
tee is making plans for the re-creation 
of Britain after the w^ar. Fruitful 
minds are at work and the precedents of 
centuries may be forsaken. 

Already the committee has suggested 
a startling form or representative gov- 
ernment for British industry. The plan 
outlined is a step beyond the familiar 
trade union organizations plus govern- 
mental interference for emergencies. It 
actually proposes the establishment of a 
considerable degree of industrial democ- 
rac}^ If it goes into effect it is likely 
to be as far-reaching in its consequences 
as the establishjiient of 'universal male 
voting in the liberal countries during the 
last century or of the enfranchisement 
of women in this century. 

Industrial Control. 

The distinguished economist, J. A. 
Hobson, outlines the reconstruction 
scheme in the Nezu Republic. In part 
he says : 

"The reception accorded in Great 
Britain by the -business world to the 
proposal to establish in each organized 
industry a national council representa- 
tive of employers and employed, for 
'the regular consideration of matters af- 
fecting the progress and well being of 
the trade,' is as noteworthy as the pro- 
posal itself. All classes appear to be- 
willing and even anxious to apply the 
l^rinciple of representative self-govern- 
ment not only to the great trades but 
to their constituent businesses. 

"The Whitley report, adopted by the 
reconstruction committee of the cabinet. 



204 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



proposes not only a joint standing in- 
dustrial council for each great national 
industry but district councils and works 
committees within each business, upon 
which capital and labor shall be equally 
represented. For, though the settlement 
of ditterences between capital and labor 
are of primary importance, the encour- 
agement of positive co-operation for in- 
dustrial progress is not less desirable if 
the future of our industry is to be con- 
fronted with any confidence.'' 

A Revolutionary Advance. 

I\Ir. Hobson points out that, while the 
councils will control the ordinary ques- 
tions which cause conflicts between em- 
ployers and employes, they will have a 
much wider scope. They would con- 
cern themselves "with such issues as 
technical training, industrial research 
and invention, the adoption of improved 
machinery and processes and all those 
matters which are included under 'sci- 
entific management.' '" 

Finance, buying and selling and the 
determination of lines of production 
would remain exclusively in the hands 
of the management, although even that 
seems not to be wholly certain. So 
broad is the policy outlined that ^Ir. 
Hobson well says "the proposals will 
mark an almost revolutionary advance 
in the status of labor. Xot merely do 
they place on a permai>ent authoritative 
basis the timid, tentative and precarious 
machinery of counciliation, but they ac- 
cord to labor a definite claim to an equal 
control with capital over all matters af- 
fecting their common interest." 
How It Happened. 

The state of public opinion which ren- 
ders practical reconstruction of this 
character is interesting. The economist 
thus explains it : 

"To those who know how bitterly an- 
tagonistic capital and labor were before 
the war and what smoldering hostility 
has been gathereing in war time it may 
be a matter of surprise that important 
employers and labor leaders in the en- 
gineering, mining and other trades 
should have assented so readily to these 
proposals for industrial harmony and 
co-operation. 

"But deeper reflection enables us to 
understand that, having in view the 
grave economic situation which must 



emerge from the war crisis, there is no 
alternative save violent revolution to the 
radical reconstruction here sketched. 
Revolution is a big word, and we are 
often reminded that the Briton is not a 
revolutionary animal either in his poli- 
tics or his economics. But sober, well- 
informed men in every walk of life are 
speculating on the possibility, even prob- 
abilitv, of an unheaval to which no other 




term is applicable. Xobody here thought 
that war was more than a small possi- 
bility three years ago, and the shock of 
their lesson has seriously afifected their 
judgment upon internal events. 
No Future Servility. 
"Every thoughtful person knows that 
the business disturbances involved in 
struggling back to a peace basis in a 
shattered and disintegrated world, the 
difficulty of supplying foods and mate- 
rials, the continuance of high prices and 
the burdens of war taxation carried on 
to years of peace must strain to the ut- 
most the productive powers of the na- 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



205 



tion. Industrial peace, in a word, de- 
pends upon high productivity, and high 
productivity in turn depends upon in- 
dustrial peace. 

''It is the perception of this truth 
which prevails upon the employing and 
propertied classes to bring them into a 
scheme making concessions to labor 
which to many of them would have ap- 
peared dangerous and unnecessary ten 
years ago. They are well aw^are labor 
will nowhere consent to settle down on 
pre-war conditions of submissiveness." 

Is there no meaning for America in 
these changes? — Chicago Herald, Sept. 
8, 1917. 



EMPLOYERS' PLAN FOR INDUS- 
TRIAL PEACE. 

\\'ashington, D. C, Sept. 7. — A for- 
mal statement representing the views of 
the larger employers of the country in 
connection with the present disturbed 
labor situation was presented by invita- 
tion to the council of national defense 
yesterday afternoon in the office of Sec- 
retary of \\'ar Baker. It was made by 
the national industrial conference board, 
constituted of representatives from the 
following national associations : 

American Cotton [Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion, American Paper and Pulp Association, 
Electrical Manufacturers' Club, IManufactur- 
inc^ Chemists' Association of the United 
States, National Association of Cotton Manu- 
facturers, National Association of IManufac- 
turers, National Association of ^^'ool Manu- 
facturers, National Automobile Chamber of 
Commerce. National Boot and Shoe ^lanufac- 
turers' Association, National Council for In- 
dustrial Defense, National Erectors" Associa- 
tion, National Founders' Association, National 
Metal Trades Association, Rubber Association 
of America, Inc., Silk Association of America, 
United Typothetae and Franklin Clubs of 
America. 

Would Adjust Possible Differences. 

The recommendations offered bv the 
board dealt with the relations of em- 
ployer and employed and the adjustment 
of possible differences during the period 
of the war. Its most important point 
was the declaration that "neither em- 
ployers nor employes shall endeavor to 
take advantage of the country's neces- 
sities to change existing standards." 

It was pointed out that in spite of ef- 
forts to establish harmonw "we find our- 



selves entering the fifth month of war 
faced with unprecedented demands for 
war production, seriously interrupted and 
delayed by numerous strikes and threats 
of strikes in every part of the country, 
some of which are likely to assume the 
proportions of a national interruption of 
essential service in our factories and 
shipyards.'' 

After reciting present conditions with 
respect to safety, health and wages in 
accordance with American standards the 
board continues : 

Other "Standards" of Importance. 

"There are. however, other 'standards" 
of employment than those relating to 
hours and wages which are of critical 
importance not merely to efficient pro- 
duction but to the institutions of a free 
people. Strikes are threatened and are 
occurring in increasing numbers to com- 
pel the exclusive employment of union 
men. This, we emphatically urge, is con- 
trary to any fair interpretation of the 
spirit and letter of the fundamental pol- 
icy declared by the council 'that employ- 
ers and employes in private industries 
should not attempt to change the stand- 
ards which they were unable to change 
under normal conditions." 

"^Moreover, there is a labor shortage 
which will necessarily 'be intensified by 
withdrawing from industry the personnel 
of its contribution to our anned forces. 
In this crisis America needs the service 
of every citizen. A\'e can no more de- 
pend upon one class to operate our fac- 
tories than to fill the ranks of our armies. 
Therefore it is inconceivable that the 
government can tolerate, much less ap- 
prove, any proposal which makes mem- 
bership in a private organization a pre- 
requisite to a citizen securing employ- 
ment in production for war. All citizens, 
union or nonunion, are ecjually entitled 
to and must receive like consideration 
from their government and equally enjoy 
the full protection of national authority 
in every circumstance of daily life. The 
assertion is untenable that a minority or 
a majority of employes in any industry 
by voluntarily associating themselves 
into an organization acquire authority or 
right over the equal liberty of those who 
do not care to do likewise. 



206 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Novemb&r, 1917 



British Policy Cited. 

"The British policy expressed in its 
munition acts is that all labor, whether it 
be that of the employer or the employe, 
of men or women, of union or nonunion, 
of the skilled or unskilled, shall be em- 
ployed to the best advantage to the coun- 
try. Xeither restriction nor discrimina- 
tion, nor. in 'controlled shops,' strikes or 
lockouts are permitted. A ministry of 
nnmitions is successfully promoting the 
expeditious output of munitions by em- 
ploying all the available labor to that 
end. AMth due regard to the plant and 
equipment of each establishment it has 
successfully subordinated conflicts be- 
tween employer and employe to the win- 
ning of the war. 

"To the same great end we propose 
through you, in the presence of the pub- 
lic, that employer and employe, organized 
and unorganized, shall pledge themselves 
to prevent strikes and lockouts, to deal 
rationally and unselfishly through a rep- 
resentative tribunal with serious wage 
disputes, and for the period of the war 
not compel or attempt to compel discrim- 
inations in employment by strikes, 
threats of strikes or lockouts. 

Should Join to Crush Sedition. 

"\\> further submit that under the 
present circumstances of national neces- 
sity, it is the duty of both the m.anufac- 
turer and of organized labor to jointly 
co-operate with the government that sedi- 
tion in any of its manifold forms, 
whether masquerading in the name of 
labor or under any other guise, shall be 
ruthlessly exposed and suppressed. 
Recommendations Are Made. 

"To epitomize our conclusions and 
recommendations we urge : 

"T. That as a basis of mutual under- 
standing employer and employe recog- 
nize and agree that now and for the 
period of the war continuous, efficient 
production can alone equip and sustain 
our military forces. Every dispute, 
whatever its motive, which interrupts 
production, furthers the end and operates 
to the advantage of the public enemy. 

"'2. The nation needs the service of 
every citizen. Its industrial workers are 
as indispensable to victory as the soldier 
on the firing line. The nonunion man is 
as necessary in the factory as he is in 
the armv. On economic as well as in- 



disputable moral grounds the govern- 
ment can therefore neither permit nor 
tolerate the exclusion of any laborer 
from productive employment. We, 
therefore, urge the council to adopt and 
reassert as its guiding principle the 
fundamental American doctrine authori- 
tatively stated by the Anthracite Coal 
Strike Commission with the approval of 
representatives of both employers and 
unions included in its membership and 
commended as the basis of industrial 
adjustments by Presidents Roosevelt, 
Taft and Wilson: 

" 'That no person shall be refused 
employment or in any way discriminated 
against on account of membership or 
nonmembership in any labor organiza- 
tion ; that there shall be no discrimina- 
tion against, or interference with, any 
employe who is not a member of any 
labor organization by members of such 
organization.' 

Defines "Change in Standards." 

"3. The council's reiterated recom- 
mendation that 'employers and employes 
in private industries should not attempt 
to take advantage of the existing ab- 
normal conditions to change the stand- 
ards which they were unable to change 
under normal conditions,' should now re- 
ceive an unambiguous interpretation to 
assure its practical application as a 
working principle. To this end we pro- 
pose : 

"(a) That applied to existing statu- 
tory regulations intended to promote 
safety and health, it shall be agreed that 
for the period of the war there shall be 
no suspension or modification of such 
provisions, except upon recommendation 
of the council of national defense after 
due investigation by its agencies and 
when, in its judgment, required by the 
exigencies of war. 

"(b) lApplied to wages, demands 
shall be tested by the prevailing local 
standard of the establishment in effect at 
the beginning of the war with such modi- 
fication as may be shown to be necessary 
to meet any demonstrated advance in 
the cost of living. 

"(c) Applied to hours, the standard 
shall be those established by statute or 
prevailing in the establishment at the be- 
ginning of the war, subject to change 
only when in the opinion of the council 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



207 



of defense it is necessary to meet the re- 
quirements of the government. 

"(d) Applied to what are commonly 
known as 'open' or 'closed' shop condi- 
tions, it shall be understood and agreed 
that every employer entering the period 
of the war with a union shop shall not 
by a lockout or other means undertake to 
alter such conditions for the duration of 
the war, nor shall any combination of 
workmen undertake during the like pe- 
riod to 'close' an 'open' shop. 

Adjustment Board Recommended. 

"4. Adopting these standards as the 
basis of its operation, we recommend the 
creation of a federal board to adjust la- 
bor disputes for the duration of the war. 
The activities of this board to be con- 
fined to disputes growing out of employ- 
ment on the subject matter of war pro- 
duction for the government. To such 
board shall be primarily referred for final 
settlement all major disputes of the na- 
ture suggested with full power to create 
all machinery necessary to execute its 
functions. Its decisions must bind all 
parties to the dispute. It should be con- 
stituted equally of representatives of 
employes, employers and the govern- 
ment, the representatives of the latter to 
hold the deciding voice in the event of 
an equal division of opinion. It is to be 
further understood and agreed that there 
shall be no interruption of production by 
strike, lockout or other means within the 
contract of employer or employe. 

"5. We pledge to the country through 
you the acceptance of such a program by 
the great body of representative associa- 
tions and individual manufacturers we 
are authorized to represent. We do not 
seek to be regarded as the exclusive 
spokesman of all industry and will co- 
operate in any helpful capacity with any 
manufacturer, whether a member of our 
association or not. 

Propose Conference of Unions. 
"6. To secure in the public interest a 
mutual understanding and agreement 
predicated upon the proposals set forth, 
we suggest: That the council of na- 
tional defense call at the earliest con- 
venient date a conference of representa- 
tive national and international officers 
of American trades unions, that thev may 
be requested to join in the pledge here 



made on behalf of employers. Their 
loyal co-operation for the duration of the 
war will assure a known standard of 
conduct to govern these vital industrial 
relations. The national safety will then 
be no longer imperiled by dispatches, 
halting vital production and necessarily 
operating to give aid and assistance to 
the public enemy.'' — Chicago Daily 
N'ezvs, Sept. 7, 19 17. 



AN ACROSTIC. 

Candidly, 

You 

Nulhfy 

Organized 

Secrecy — 

Uncovering, 

Rebuking, 

Enlightening. 

John S. White. 
Highspire. Pa. 



A PROPHET'S VOICE. 

The rummies do their best to link the 
name of Abraham Lincoln with the sa- 
loon business, and they are guilty of the 
most infamous falsehoods in their at- 
tempt to do this. It has been proven 
beyond the question of a doubt that Mr. 
Lincoln was against the saloon. Read 
the following utterances he made before 
the Washingtonians at Springfield, Illi- 
nois, February 22, 1842: 

"Turn now to the temperance revolu- 
tion. In it we shall find a stronger bond- 
age broken, a viler slavery manumitted, 
a greater tyrant deposed ; in it more of 
want supplied, more of disease healed, 
more sorrow assuaged. By it no or- 
phans starving, no widows weeping. By 
it none wounded in feeling, none injured 
in interest ; even the dram-maker and 
dram-seller will- have glided into other 
occupations and staiid ready to join all 
others in the universal song of gladness. 
And what a noble ally this to the cause 
of political freedom ; with such an aid 
its march can not fail to be on and on. 
till every son of earth shall drink in rich 
fruition the sorrow-quenching draughts 
of perfect liberty. 

"And when the victory shall be com- 
p\etQ — when there shall be neither a slave 
nor a drunkard on the earth — how proud 
the title of that land which may truly 
claim to be the birthplace and the cradle 



208 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November. 1917 



of both those revolutions that shall have 
ended in victory. How nobly distin- 
o^iiished "that people who shall have 
planted and niirtiu-ed to maturity both 
the pohtical and moral freedom of their 
species." — The Free Methodist. 



"TEN MINUTES OF FICTION." 

There is little doubt but what Masonry 
assists many a man to attain and main- 
tain self respect. — Texas Freemason. 

^lasonry cannot always exclude bad 
men, but they usually become reformed 
or do not remain long on its rolls. — 
Texas Freemason. 

Dr. Madison C. Peters, in his lecture 
last evening in the Memorial Baptist 
church. Broad and Master streets, on 
"The ]\Iasons as Makers of America," 
reviewed the story of the American 
Revolution and declared that from the 
laying of the plot for independence in 
Green Dragon Inn, Boston, by such ]\Ia- 
sons as Samuel Adams and Joseph War- 
ren, the development of opinion which 
preceded the war to the crowning tri- 
umph of Washington, the Mason, as 
President of the United States was a 
Masonic movement. — Philadelphia Puh- 
Ue Ledger, Jan. 26, 191 7. 

The rules of Scottish rite Masonry 
are : To obey the laws of one's country ; 
live in conformity with the precepts of 
honor ; love one's neighbors ; work in- 
cessantlv to promote the happiness of 
mankind, and to prosecute its progres- 
sive and peaceful emancipation. — Texas 
Freemason. 

It is said that Washington never gave 
his confidence to any of his generals un- 
less they were Masons. — Texas Free- 
mason. 

Masonry considers all men brothers. 
Hence, were Masonry ruling the world, 
there would be no wars. — Masonic 
Home Journal. 

One hundred and forty-one years ago 
our Masonian forefathers framed the 
Declaration of American Independence. 
— Masonic Chronicler. 

All movements for the uplift of hu- 
manity are ^lasonic. — Texas Free- 
mason. 

America's present war against Prus- 
sianism and kaiserism comes nearer be- 
ing a war for Masonic principles than 



any other conflict in the world's history. 
— Masonic Chronicler. 

Masonry tends to make men good citi- 
zens, and is, therefore, a splendid asset 
for any community. 

^Iiasonry and morality go hand in 
hand. 

Masonry goes hand in hand with pa- 
triotism. 

Opposition to Masonry is entirely due 
to ignorance. 
— "Scissored Masonic Thoughts'' from 

Masonic Chronicler. 

WHiile a young man and soon after 
moving from his native home in Ken- 
tucky to his plantation in Mississippi, 
Jeff Davis bought a cargo of negroes 
j'ust brought over from Africa by a na- 
tive slave trader, who ran the blockade 
and landed them at New Orleans. While 
they were working in the cotton fields 
one day Mr. Davis observed his new ne- 
groes making Masonic signs to the over- 
seer. That individual, not being a 
]\Iason. thought the negroes were only 
carrying on a system of signals of prepa- 
ration to revolt and was about to have 
them whipped. Mr. Davis stopped this 
proceeding. He tested the negroes thor- 
oughly, and to his amazement discovered 
that they were Masons, though brought 
from the very heart of Africa. Being a 
]\Iason himself, he lost no time in giving 
them their freedom and choice of either 
returning to Africa or remaining on his 
estate until he could provide for them in 
some other way. Most of them were 
shipped to Africa at Davis' expense, 
though some of them remained with him 
to the end. — Masonic Exchange. 



Do not say "Life is short." Christ's 
life was short; yet he finished the work 
that was given him to do. He was 
never in a hurry. And if God has given 
us anything; to do for him, he will give 
time enough to finish it w^ith a repose 
like Christ's. — Drummond. 



No restlessness or discontent can 
change your lot. Others may have other 
circumstances surroimdine them, but 
here are yours. You had better make 
UD your mind to accept what vou cannot 
alter. You can live a beautiful life in 
the midst of your present circumstances. 
—J. R. Miller, D. D. 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



209 



3lot|n (Jpmttrg AJiams —^xxt\^ l^rtBxhmt llmtf Ji BUUb 



"^ [We shall publish from time to time, under 
this heading, extracts from the letters and 
addresses of Mr. Adams on Freemasonry. 
These were written during the great anti- 
masonic agitation, following the murder of 
William Morgan by the Freemasons, and 
are a very valuable series, whether viewed 
from either a literary or a historic stand- 
point.] 

Ouincy, 20 August, 1832. 
To William L. Stone, Esq. 
Dear Sir: 

(Continued.) 

The secrets, to the keeping of 
which the Entered Apprentice is sworn, 
are indefinite. In genuine Mason- 
ry, when revealed to him, he finds 
them frivolous. You acknowledged that 
your first feeling upon receiving them 
was disappointment. So must it be with 
every reflecting, intelligent man ; nor is 
it conceivable that any such Entered Ap- 
prentice, on leaving the lodge after his 
admission, should fail to have observed, 
with pain and mortification, the contrast 
between the awful solemnity of the oath 
which he has taken, and the extreme in- 
significance of the secrets revealed to 
him. It is to meet his unavoidable im- 
pression that the institution is graduated. 
The lure of curiosity is still held out, and 
its attractive power is sinewed, by the 
very disappointment which the appren- 
tice has experienced. He takes the de- 
grees of Fellowcraft and Master Mason, 
and still finds disappointment — still finds 
himself bound by tremendous oaths to 
keep trifling and frivolous secrets. The 
practice of the institution is deceptive 
and fraudulent. It holds out to him a 
promise which it never performs. Its 
promise is light ; its performance is 
darkness. 

But it introduces him to intimate, con- 
fidential and exclusive relations, with a 
select and limited circle of other men — 
and to the same confidential and ex- 
clusive relations, with the great multi- 
tudes of men belonging to every civilized 
nation throughout the globe. The En- 
tered Apprentice's oath is merely an oath 
of secrecy ; but the candidate who takes 
it has pledged himself, by his application 
for admission, to conform to all the an- 
cient established usages and customs of 



the fraternity. And the charge of the 
master, given him upon the Bible, com- 
passes, and square, presents him wath 
three precious jewels — a listening ear, a 
silent tongue, and a faithful heart — all, 
of course, exclusively applicable to the 
secrets revealed to him ; and he is told 
that the listening ear teaches him to lis- 
ten to the instructions of the worshipful 
master, but more especially to the cries 
of a worthy distressed brother; and the 
faithful heart teaches him to be faithful 
to the instructions of the worshipful 
master at all times, but more especially 
to keep and conceal the secrets of Ma- 
sonry, and those of a brother, when 
given to him in charge as such, that they 
may remain as secure and inviolable in 
his (the Entered Apprentice's) breast as 
in his (the brother's) own. Two check- 
words are also presented to him — truth 
and union — the explanation of which 
concludes that the heart and tongue of 
Freemasons join in promoting each oth- 
er's welfare, and rejoicing in each oth- 
er's prosperity. 

Thus the essential nature of the En- 
tered Apprentice's oath, preceded by his 
pledge to conform to all the established 
usages and customs of the fraternity, 
and followed by the charge of the mas- 
ter, is secret and exclusive favor, as- 
sistance and fidelity to -the brotherhood 
and brothers of the craft. 

Now combine together the disappoint- 
ment which every intelligent accepted 
Mason must feel at the puerility of the 
secrets revealed to him, compared with 
the appalling solemnity of the oath ex- 
acted from him for the purchase of his 
lambskin apron, and the secret ties with 
which he has linked himself with multi- 
tudes of other men, exclusively to favor, 
assist and be faithful to each other, and 
acknowledge that the temptation to make 
secrets more important, and to turn them 
to better account to the craft, must be 
irresistible. Judge this system a priori, 
without reference to any of the conse- 
cjuences which it has produced, and say 
if human ingenuity could invent an en- 
gine better suited to conspiracy of any 
kind. The Entered Apprentice returns 
from the lodge with his curiosity stimu- 



210 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



lated. his imagination bewildered, and 
his reason disappointed. The mixture 
of religion and morality, blended with 
falsehood and imposture, which pervade 
all the ceremonies of initiation, is hke 
arsenic mingled up with balm. 

"]\Iost dangerous 
Is that temptation which doth lead us on 
To sin in loving virtue." 

If the candidate has ])een educated to 
a sincere and heart-felt reverence for 
religion and the Bible, and if he exer- 
cises his reason he knows that all the 
tales of Jachin and Boaz. of Solomon's 
temple, of Hiram Abift and Jubela. 
Jubelo, and Jubelum, are impostures — 
poisons poured into the perennial foun- 
tain of truth — traditions exactly resem- 
bling those reprobated by Jesus Christ, 
as making the Word of God of none ef- 
fect. If, as in this age but too often hap- 
pens, he enters the lodge a skeptic, the 
use of the Bible there, if it have any 
effect upon him, will turn him out a con- 
firmed infidel. The sincere and rational 
believer in the gospel can find no con- 
firmation of his faith in the unw- arrant- 
able uses made of the Holy Scriptures to 
shed an unction of their sanctity around 
the fabulous fabric of Freemasonry ; 
while the reprobate miscreant wnll be 
taught the uses to wdiich fraud and se- 
crecy may turn the lessons of piety and 
virtue, inculcated in the sublimest ef- 
fusions of divine inspiration. In those 
Scriptures we are told that when "the 
children of Israel did secretly those 
things that were not right against the 
• Lord their God," they became idolators, 
and were carried into captivity. Their 
cities then Avere soon filled with a mon- 
grel race of Babylonians and Assyrians, 
who perverted the Word of God wdth the 
impostures of paganism: burned their 
children in fire, to the gods of Sephar- 
viam ; and ''feared the Lord and served 
their graven images," — an emblem of 
Freemasonry far more illustrative of its 
character than the tragedy of Hiram 
AbifT. 

The Entered Apprentice's oath, is 
therefore, in its owm nature, a seminal 
principle of conspiracy; and this objec- 
tion applies to the only oath .originally 
taken in all the degrees of Freemasonry 
at its first institution. The ostensible 
primitive purposes of Freemasonry 



were all comprised in good fellowship. 
But to good fellowship, whether of labor 
or refreshment, neither secrecy, nor 
oath, nor penalties are necessary or con- 
genial. In the original institution of 
Freemasonry there was then an ostensi- 
ble and a secret object, and by the grad- 
uation of the order the means were sup- 
plied of converting it to any evil pur- 
pose of associated powder, screened from 
the danger of detection. Hence, all the 
bitter fruits which the institution has 
borne in Germany, in France, in Mex- 
ico, and lately, in this our beloved coun- 
try. Xor could they have failed to be 
produced in Great Birtain, but that, by 
sharp and biting statutes, they have been 
confined wdthin the limits of the ostensi- 
ble object of the brotherhood — good fel- 
low^ship. 

I am, W'ith much respect, dear sir. 
Your friend and servant, 

John Quincy Adams. 



Fvery star shines for all eyes. Every 
breeze blows for the whole human race. 
Every rain drop falls for all life. The 
light, air, rivers, oceans, mountains, 
worlds, science, Christianity, life, all 
good, yea, God himself, are for all, old 
and young, male and female, the strong 
and the w^eak, everywhere and ahvays. 
But not so wath the Lodge. It is for the 
few;, and then only for the strong. 
These and the Lodge are as diflerent as 
the Kingdom of God is from that of 
Satan. 



BOOK NOTICES. 

In the Twinkling of An Eye. A Scriptural 
vie\^- of the world today and the future of 
the Church and the world as revealed by 
prophesy. There is very little in the book- 
let besides the Word of God. It is com- 
piled by a business man for busy people. 
Published bv the Philadelphia School of 
the Bible, 1720 Arch Street, Philadelphia. 
Pennsylvania. Price 5 cents per copy. 
Address all orders to the publishers. 

The Mexican Problem. By C. W. Barron. 

The author of this book believes that the 
salvation of Mexico is to be found in in- 
dustrial development. Mr. Barron is iden- 
tified with the Wall Street Journal, and 
his viewpoint is that of the caoitalist. 
Published by Houghton, Alifflin & Com- 
T-anv, New York : 150 pages ; cloth : price, 
SI. 00. Address all orders to the pub- 
lishers. 



■kAMHK 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAX CVXOSURE. 



211 



EbtomL 



LABOR UNREST. 

We have printed upon another page 
two articles relating to labor unrest. ( )ne 
concerns the 1 British situation and the 
solution proposed for postwar da}"s. 

The plan of the British Reconstruc- 
tion Commission is novel and. if put into 
effect will be watched with great inter- 
est on this side of the water. Whether 
the identical plan would be feasible at 
this time in the United States is a ques- 
tion, since English and American labor 
conditions are dift'erent. However, it 
has the merit of affording a basis of co- 
operation between labor and capital 
which, at the present time is neither to 
be found in this country nor in Eng- 
land. A movement here that would put 
labor disputes upon a rational and or- 
derly and peaceful basis for settlement. 
would be welcomed. 

The other article treats of our own 
situation during the period of the war 
and the proposed plan to prevent labor 
disputes during that time. 

The proposed plan is. of course, lim- 
ited to the duration of the war. It is. 
we believe, characterized by its fairness 
to both union and nonunion labor and 
also to capital. If such a plan could be 
put into operation, we believe it would 
prove so beneficial to labor and capital 
and to the public also, that legislation 
would be enacted compelling the peace- 
ful settlement of labor disputes. 

We have not learned of any move by 
the unions to accept these proposals. 
They ought to be accepted for patriotic 
reasons, if for no other. As yet. how- 
ever, labor unions do not seem to be 
moved to any extent by appeals for 
wholehearted, loyal service. A glance 
at the reports of union activities, taken 
from the public press, and published in 
the Cynosure from month to month, 
clearly demonstrates that labor unions as 
a whole are selfishly using the present 
necessity of the Government to gain for 
themselves that which they could not 
readily secure under normal conditions. 

Another thing is worth remembering 
in this connection : labor unions do not 
want conditions improved through ordi- 



nary peaceful channels. Why ? Be- 
cause their hold on the laboring class 
will be lessened when the workers learn 
that they can secure what they want 
through legislation, or other peaceful 
methods, independent of the Sheas, 
( iompers and other manipulators of the 
unions. 

This is why the leaders of labor have 
bitterly opposed compulsory arbitration 
— not because labor might not secure all 
that fairly belongs to it, but because the 
autocratic power of the leaders would 
be weakened. And fcr this same rea- 
son, we do not expect to see labor will- 
ingly accept the proposals of .the manu- 
facturers, for. if the plan proved the 
benefit to all concerned that we believe 
it would, it might be impossible to go 
back to former conditions, and the lead- 
ers would consecjuently lose something 
of their power. 

Rapid and lasting progress in the labor 
field will be made when real democratic 
control replaces the autocratic grip of 
the leaders who no v.- manipulate the la- 
boring classes. 



THE SAME OLD TUNE. 

With variations, at most, the refrain 
unceasingly returns, which joins the 
name of ^Masonry with that of V\'ashing- 
ton. Although, as a matter of fact. 
Washington had little to do with Free- 
masonry except to take three initiations 
when he was twenty and twenty-one 
years old, he has always been misrepre- 
sented as a ^lason of great zeal and high 
official standing. This began even while 
he still lived, and while it could be dis- 
proved. After he died, it soon broke 
forth with flamboyant display of fiction. 
Trailing across the subrequent years, the 
untruth rears its head with boldness, 
even until the present time. 

In these days, when Masonry is mak- 
ing elaborate preparation to shield itself 
under the fame and prestige of Wash- 
ington as almost never before, it be- 
hooves the friends of truth to make 
themselves much better acquainted with 
ascertained and admitted facts than 
most of them probably are. In addition 
to what has already been printed,, mat- 
ter calculated to convince the unwarv 
and ill-informed is sure to appear at no 



212 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



distant time, and it should not catch us 
unprepared to shift its absurdities and 
falsities. Those who speak or write er- 
roneously on the subject need not always 
be accused of intentional falsehood. One 
who relies on what he supposes to be 
credible history, may copy its falsehoods 
without making them anything more 
than his ow^n errors. We need not ac- 
cuse President jMcKinley of knowing 
what he did when he said, in an address 
delivered near the Mt. Vernon tomb, 
that Washington died master of a lodge. 

These remarks have been called forth 
by a similarly erroneous statement made 
in a rather recent article on Alexandria. 
This is the incorrect statement: "Reg- 
ularly, George Washington used to drive 
to tow^n from Mt. Vernon to attend the 
meetings of the Masonic chapter in 
Alexandria, of which he was grand mas- 
ter for a long time." It might seem al- 
most too trifling a comment on this to 
say that, if it had been as stated, Wash- 
ington would have been likely to ride 
and not to drive. To the last, this true 
Virginian lived on horseback. Just be- 
fore he died, he rode around his own 
plantation. But it is not beneath notice 
that the writer calls Alexandria Lodge a 
''Masonic chapter." W^e know of no 
Masonic authority for finding a Royal 
Arch Chapter there at that time. It is 
also certain that Masonry does not in- 
clude among its inventive claims, that 
of his ever proceeding beyond the Blue 
Lodge. His Masonic designation never 
passes from ''brother" to "companion" 
in Masonic writings, so far as we can 
recollect — as it must if he belonged to 
any chapter. If the writer made a slip 
by using the word chapter when he 
really meant to speak merely of Alexan- 
dria lodge, then he made another break 
in calling the supposed master of a 
subordinate and local lodge a grand mas- 
ter, for such a lodge has no such officer. 
Grand masters, grand secretaries, and 
so on, are officers only of grand lodges. 

The truth is, that Washington was 
never a companion of the chapter, and 
was not an attendant at meetings of 
Alexandria lodge, not even when it 
called him master for a year during 
v/hich he had no actual membership. He 
was no more than nominal master, never 



occupying the chair or even attending 
meeting. He was never a real member, 
or more than nominal or complimentary, 
of any lodge but Fredericksburg, and 
was not master of that. The statement 
we have examined is an addition to the 
long line of fictions, and its slips dim 
even the plausibility which uninformed 
readers might have imagined. Well in- 
structed Freemasons would pay no heed 
to such a statement, but it is adapted to 
convey misinformation to the minds of 
persons outside the order. 



THE SEVENTEENTH YEAR. 

It is noticeable that the seventeenth 
year of each second century finds a pecu- 
liar crisis, or a striking condition of 
mankind, awaiting its arrival. In 15 17, 
both clergy and laity were sounding the 
depths of intellectual ignorance and 
moral degradation. Hence both were 
ripe for such a scheme as Leo X, the 
reigning pope, adopted in order to raise 
funds for the completion of the great 
church in Rome that is called St. Peter's. 
Already, the deluded people had been 
familiar with the practice of buying 
pieces of parchment bearing the pope's 
assurance of immunity from punishment 
in Purgatory for each sin therein named. 
A book of rates defined the price at 
which the buyer of an indulgence cer- 
tificate could compound for his specified 
sin. Agents were appointed to conduct 
the sanctimonious traffic, and merchants 
bought the goods in packages to , ell them 
out at retail. 

In the year 1517 a fresh issue was 
made for the purpose already named, 
when a monopoly of the distribution in 
Saxony was allowed to the Archbishop 
of Metz. He in turn employed as his 
agent John Tetzel, a Dominican monk 
already known as a great vender of in- 
dulgences. Ecclesiastics as well as lay- 
men had bought at stated rates ; for in- 
stance, a deacon could contribute to the 
completion of the great Roman shrine, 
enrich at the same time the holy Bishop 
of Metz, while in the same act buying 
for twenty crowns the pope's absolution 
for murder. A bishop might, for three- 
hundred livres, become a guiltless as- 
sassin ; while, for a third as much, a 
clergyman could in perfect innocence 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



213 



violate his vow of chastity. Such were 
the rates in the papal book of indul- 
gences, and such were probably those 
which Tetzel usually obtained from de- 
voted Roman Catholics in Saxony. Yet 
one day while pursuing the business in 
Leipzig, he was asked by a nobleman, 
whether he could grant absolution for 
a sin which a man intended to commit; 
whereupon the ready monk replied : 
"Certainly, if the money is paid down." 
Upon this, the nobleman bought an in- 
dulgence in which the intended crime 
was not named, but which equally well 
insured his soul against purgatorial fire. 
Departing from Leipzig, soon after- 
ward, Tetzel was waylaid, robbed, and 
vigorously beaten. In leaving him for 
some Good Samaritan to find, the high- 
wayman, who wa^ no other than the 
insured nobleman, remarked, "This is 
the sin I intended to commit, for which 
I have your absolution my pocket.'' 

Two hundred years later, in 1717, 
Freemasonry began its career of hy- 
pocrisy, vice, and superstition. Li 191 7, 
the year of its bi-centennial, the cycle 
returns with another tidal wave of dis- 
simulation, hypocrisy, and sin. "Thrice 
the brindled cat hath mewed." 



Friends of Eastern Secretary Stod- 
dard will be glad to know of the ar- 
rival, on September 26th, of a grand- 
child in the home of his daughter, Mrs. 
A. C. Baker, of Washington, D. C. 

Reports have it that the little stranger, 
Wenona Jean, is "as pretty as a pic- 
ture." Secretary Stoddard displays an 
uncommonly broad smile when anyone 
accosts him, "Grandpa." The Cynosure 
sends congratulations. 



IF THE BLIND LEAD. 

During initiation the candidate, led 
about with his eyes covered, is in effect 
physically blind. After initiation he re- 
mains half blind to the significance of 
ceremonies, if not also to the complete 
significance of obligations sworn. Rut 
he may happen to follow up clues, mak-. 
ing discovery of mouldy refuse hidden 
in what has been Masonicallv named the 
"rul)bish of the temple." If then he is 
still fascinated by the search instead of 
being disgusted with what he finds, he 



surely falls into an intellectual and moral 
ditch. 

In similar blindness, physical and men- 
tal, they who thus mislead have them- 
selves been led. Some of them have 
nosed in the rubbish, attaining inner 
darkness for themselves. As a result, 
while the physically blind are led by the 
physically seeing, the inner truth that 
both are blind appears wdien both fall 
into the same ditch. The moral for un- 
wary triflers with peril is not to commit 
themselves blindly to blind guides. 



REV. E. P. WOODWARD. 

We have learned of the death of Rev. 
E. P. Woodward, of Westbrook, Maine. 
Rev. Mr. Woodward was for many years 
a faithful friend of this Association. He 
was widely known as the Editor and 
publisher of the Safeguard and Armory, 
a quarterly publication. We understand 
that his magazine has been discontinued, 
since no one has been found to take his 
place. 



A BLIGHTED TREE. 

After a quarter of a century of life in 
front of the White House, an Egyptian 
Acacia which President Benjamin Har- 
rison planted has been smitten with 
blight. At the middle of May experts 
of the Department of Agriculture took 
the case in hand, attempting to rescue the 
historic tree planted by a deceased presi- 
dent. The tree is said to have been of 
interest to thousands of the INIasonic 
order, and this leads to the explanation 
that a Mason who is deemed free from 
sin, through observing the precepts and 
obligations of Masonry, as. for example, 
by hiding secrets of Alasonic criminals, 
or by helping Royal Arch Masons whose 
crimes have brought them into trouble — 
such a sinless Mason is an Acacian. The 
Acacia Sprig is a fixture of initiation in 
the third degree. For a Scriptural ref- 
erence to the "branch," see Ezekiel 8:17. 
It would not be strange if some Masonic 
wTiter or speaker should sooner or later 
connect ^Masonic membership with the 
planting of this tree, although neither 
of the Presidents Harrison were ever 
enlightened by Freemasonry. 



The best cure for care is believing 
prayer. 



214 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



i^etosi of 0UV Wiovk, 

SECRETARY PHILLIPS' LETTER. 

Richfield Springs, X. Y., Oct. 17, 1917. 

Before leaving Chicago I got out an 
edition of 10.000 eight-page tracts for 
our soldiers. The text of the tract ap- 
pears in this number of the Cynosure 
under its heading: "A \\^ord to Our 
Soldier Friends." 

At this writing the only way to get 
this kindly appeal and warning into the 
hands of our soldieis is by mail. We 
will send you free as many tracts as 
vou need for your friends in the army 
or the navy. 

A personal word from you to your 
soldier friends asking them to read and 
think about the contents of the bit of 
paper you enclose, is the most effective 
way to use the tract and one which will 
result in great good. What you do 
should be done now while we are able 
to supply your needs. 

I have sent to the editors of some fif- 
teen denominational papers, an item for 
publication, asking the pastors of the dif- 
ferent churches to send us a postal card 
request for as many of these tracts as 
they or the boys who have gone from 
their congregations can use. 

In addition to the above I have sent 
out nearly eight hundred personal letters 
with a tract enclosed, asking for such 
contributions as any one may be moved 
to give to carry on this special work. 

I am also endeavoring to forward this 
work in one other way, the success or 
failure of which I may be able to report 
to you next month. 

Our readers will be glad to know that 
we have just gotten out a new edition 
of President Charles G. Finney's book 
on Masonry in paper covers, which con- 
tains an excellent halftone likeness of 
President Finney in his prime. This 
book is a classic and this new portrait 
of the author will add to its value. 

Since the last issue of our magazine 
we have had the privilege of helping 
countries other than our own. The 
worker in South Africa to whom litera- 
ture was sent has an interesting state- 
ment in this number as to why he re- 
nounced ^lasonry. We have established 
connection with Christian workers in 



Australia, who will carry a small stock 
of our literature and advertise it in con- 
nection with their own publications. 

We have also had calls from Hon- 
duras as well as from Canada, for light 
on lodges. For several months we have 
been unable to furnish some of our most 
popular tracts but we are getting out a 
new edition and hope that those who 
have been disappointed will now renew 
their orders. We can fill them. 

Xow is the time to bear your testi- 
mony to the truth of salvation only 
through the atonement of Jesus Christ 
and to warn against Satan's secret so- 
ciety way of salvation. Send one dollar 
for two pounds of your choice of tracts 
and see that every one in your church 
has one. Ever}^ tract prayerfully given 
out will doubtless have the blessing of 
God upon it and upon the worker. 

I trust that friends who can, will make 
a special offering for our Southern 
Agent, Rev. F. J. Davidson. Please 
send to this office, and it will be prompt- 
ly forwarded. The church of which 
Rev. Mr. Davidson is pastor, can give 
him only a small amount for his services, 
which, taken with what the National 
Christian Association can pay him, makes 
after all only a meager support. His 
work for our Cause will be considerably 
increased if he can receive what he needs 
for his expenses. 

Wm. I. Phillips, Secy.-Treas. 



Rev. R. S. Real, Victor, Colorado, 
wrote under date of September 7, 1917, 
ordering the tract, "Why I am not a 
Mason" by Rev. Dr. R. A. Torrey. He 
writes : "Glad to say that this tract with 
some other antisecret tracts published by 
you, has been a great blessing and help 
in my ministry and has also been used 
by the Spirit to arouse many believers 
to their responsibility in this matter." 



In a letter ordering tracts, Mr. John S. 
Little of Johannesburg, Transvaal, South 
Africa, writes : 

I was a ]^Iason for sixteen years and 
I have got out of them. I left them be- 
cause they were allowing Roman Cath- 
olics and Jews and anyone that came 
along to become members. I left them 
because I could not be a Christian and 
a ]\Iason at the same time. I left them 



Xovember, 191! 



CHRISTIAX CYNOSURE. 



215 



because their doctrine is antagonistic to 
the doctrine of the Lord Jesus Christ and 
I fully made up my mind that I would 
not allow these blood-curdling oaths to 
remain upon me. 



MASONIC FACTS VS. DR. PETERS' 
FICTIONS. 

Rev. Adam Murrman. well known in 
some portions of our land as a Bible 
teacher and at one time as an agent of 
the National Christian Association, gave 
an address on Monday, October ist, in 
Allentown, Pennsylvania, answering the 
boosting of ]\Iasonry by Rev. ^ladison 
C. Peters. D. D.. of Xew York City. 
The subject of IMr. ]\Iurrman's address 
was: 'The Facts About ]\Iasonry, ver- 
sus the Fictions of ]\Iadison C. Peters.'"' 

The following is the outline of Rev. 
^It. ]\Iurrman's address: 

What Kind of a Mason was George 
Washington? 

Joined at 21. in 1753. From 1754 to 
1758 ]\Iasonry finds no evidence of lodge 
attendance. From 1759 to 1774, 15 years, 
]\Iasonry finds no recoid of attendance. 
From 1775 to 1778. no record of at- 
tendance. In 1777 he himself mentions 
having never been ^Master, or even 
Warden. In the period of 1780 to 1783 
declines to advise his aid-de-camp to 
join. Styles ]\Iasonry for the most part 
''child's play''; avers that it "might be 
used for the worst of purposes." In 
1798 writes in correcting an "error" : 
"The fact is. I preside over none : nor 
have I been in one more than once or 
twice within the last thirty years." In 
1781, as appeals by the recoid of "King 
David's Lodge," it was "not agreeable 
to him to be addressed even as a private 
]\Iason." A vote of thanks to A\'ash- 
ington was opposed *n Congress bv three 
"high I\lasons." A\'hy? The above rec- 
ord answers it. When he sav. it from 
the inside he lost interest in it, refused 
its honors, absented himself from its 
sessions, and spoke disparaginglv of its 
"work." 

Governor Josepli Ritner of Pennsyl- 
vania, in an official communication to 
the Flouse of Representatives, begins as 
follows: "Xo occurrence of my life 
ever aft'orded me greater pleasure than 
that of being called upon officially to 
vindicate the memory of ^^'ashington 



from the STIGMA of adherence to se- 
cret societies." 

How can Outsiders know anything about 
Masonry? 

Three sources of information — 

1. Public Exercises. Funerals, Dedi- 
cations, Laying of Cornerstones, etc. 

2. Publications. Manuals, Lexicons, 
Rituals, etc. 

3. Published Testimonies of Seced- 
ers. ]\Ien like \\'m. ^lorgan, who was 
murdered by ^Masonry for revealing its 
secrets. 

I\Ien like Stephen Merritt, Judge ]\Ier- 
rick. Col. Geo. R. Clarke, Pres. C. G. 
Finney, and many others ; clean, con- 
scientious, consecrated Christian men. 

What kind of Oats do Masons Take? 
They are — 

1. Extra-judicial. That is. without 
authority — either civil or religious. 

2. Extra ^Malicious. Without consid- 
eration for the "profane" outsider. Also 
swearing, as in the obligation of the 
"Knights of Kadosh" — "I swear to take 
revenge on the traitors of ^lasonry." 

3. Extremelv Pernicious. In their 
partial moralit}'. and the barbarity of 
all their penalties. 

Is Masonry a Religious Institution? 

1. Its authorities say that it is. 
Mackey's Ritualist: "Masonry is a re- 
ligious institution." 

2. Its actions and assumptions show 
that it is. It wants to be in at funerals 
with its lites and ceremonies: and even 
at church dedications. 

3. Its appointments prove that it is. 
It has "\\'orshipful blasters." rituals, 
prayers, benedictions, etc. 

Whcit kind of a Religion Has It! 

1. Deistic. Ignoring both Christ and 
the Holy Spirit, 

2. Deceptive. Because veiled in Bible 
terms — "L'sing the word of God deceit- 
fully." 

3. Devilish. Its "God" is the Devil : 
though they are all unconscious of the 
fact. See tract : "The \\'orship of Se- 
cret Societies Off'ered to Satan." 

Why no Christian Should Join It. 

1. Because of its bondage. Xo Free- 
mason is a free man ; he has surrendered 
his liberty in his lodge oaths. 

2. Because of its barbarous oaths. 
Xo Christian can consistentlv take them. 



216 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1917 



Xo decent man woald assume their pen- 
alties if he knew them in advance. 

3. Because of its batlike love of dark- 
ness. We are not of the night, but of 
the day. Jesus said: "In secret have 
I said nothing." \\'e are to "let our 
light shine" and to "walk as children of 
light/' 

4. Because of its barring the name 
of Christ. "Xo man cometh to the 
Father but by me." 

5. Because of its bogus brotherhood. 
"Be not unequally yoked with unbeliev- 
ers." 

6. Because of its "benevolent" sel- 
fishness. On the principle of "you tickle 
me and I'll tickle you." 

7. Because of its blasphemous tri- 
fling with sacred names and things. As 
when asking God's help when assuming 
the barbarous penalties. "So help me 
God and keep me steadfast," etc. The 
only "God" who will help in such a case 
is Satan. 



FROM THE WEST COAST. 

I am shocked. The idea of me ever 
getting a letter from the Cynosure stat- 
ing that I am behind with my dues. It 
is a scandal, a spot upon an otherwise 
honest character. Forgive me. I have 
been very busy. 

We had a big afl^air this summer, when 
we united the three largest Lutheran 
bodies of X'orwegian-Americans into 
one : "The X'orwegian Lutheran Church 
of America." It has taken continual 
work to get up a great reformation cele- 
bration in this neighborhood and also 
to give addresses in other places. I go 
next week to Portland, Oregon, and to 
Spokane, Washington, on similar er- 
rands. 

You know of course, that Lutherans 
this year make a great deal of the four 
hundredth anniversary of their church. 
Four hundred years ago Luther nailed 
on the doors of the church of Witten- 
berg the sentences that shook the throne 
of the Vatican. This was a shock that 
Rome has never been able entirely to 
overcome. All Protestants glory in the 
Reformation, as they all — whether Luth- 
erans or not — gained their liberty of 
conscience, faith and expression through 
it. 

Lutherans have been accused of dis- 



loyalty to America, because German 
Lutherans have made disloyal remarks. 
This is part of a Catholic scheme to dis- 
credit Protestants. That this is the case 
is proven by the fact, that the daily press, 
which we all know is under Catholic cen- 
sure or favor — whether under Protes- 
tant management or not — tells only of 
disloyal remarks from Lutheran Ger- 
mans and are silent on the fact, that 
there are Catholic Germans and that the 
state church of Austria is Roman Cath- 
olic. The fact is, it is not a religious 
but a national question as there are Cath- 
olics and Protestants on both sides. 

Church work on the coast is difficult 
for several reasons. A percentage of 
those who came so far West, were orig- 
inahy of a decidedly unchurchly charac- 
ter. Another difficulty is found in the 
fact that so many people here move 
from one place to another. These things, 
however, are gradually changing. To 
show that conditions are still changing, 
it is sufficient to say that, while I have 
been in Ballard, Seattle's northwest sec- 
tion, for less than eight years, I am al- 
ready the senior Protestant pastor out 
of twenty. The other churches have had 
from two to five pastors in that period. 

The L^nion of the three largest Luth- 
eran church bodies of the LTnited States 
into one, "The Xi'orwegian Lutheran 
Church of America" with half a million 
souls and over twelve hundred pastors 
has strengthened our position and we 
hope it will make for spirituality and ef- 
ficiency in God's kingdom. As a result, 
congregations that were competing in 
the same neighborhood are uniting, and 
pastors whose parishes interlapped now 
divide the field in a more profitable way. 
\\Tiere I am, we had two churches nine 
short blocks apart with many of my 
people passing the other church. Xow 
the two congregations are together and 
have the largest church of our Synod 
on the Coast and ought to be ready for 
better and larger work. (For the infor- 
mation of my friends I mav add, that I 
have been unanimously called to serve 
this new church.) 

And finally — the work the Cynosure 
is most interested in — Lodgery, is still, 
to my mind, as burning a question as 
when the pioneers of the antilodge work 
sacrificed friends, business, and in some 



November, 1917 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



217 



cases, their lives to start the work. We 
are flooded with lodges here. Our church 
tries to take a firm stand against them 
but in mission places where the testi-' 
mony against this evil has never sounded, 
the pastors have to be a httle lenient at 
first. In my congregation I only have 
a few lodgemen, and when we formed 
the new congregation, there were two 
factions. A majority favored the para- 
graph suggested by the committee, which 
would exclude all who belonged to an 
organization in whose ritual Christ's 
name was excluded in one or more de- 
grees. A minority did not want to have 
anything to do about it. So we com- 
promised. We accepted the following: 

"Members of organizations, in whose 
ritual religion — whether in one or more 
degrees — the name of Christ is not con- 
fessed, can only become members of this 
congregation on the condition, that they 
do not oppose the testimony of pastor 
and congregation against such religions ; 
are willing to give up their membership 
in such organizations when they become 
convinced of the wrong therein accord- 
ing to the Word of God, and that they 
do not require of the pastor to partake 
in religious exercises at funerals or other 
occasions, where such organizations take 
part." Albeit a compromise, it was all 
I could accomplish. 

Rev. T. M. Slater deserves a good 
word for his antilodge work in Seattle. 
As far as I know, he is the only man 
in this city that really has put himself 
out very much to do anything. Per- 
sonally I have not been able to do much, 
as I am so very busy. Our Lutheran 
people have to listen to these things con- 
tinually more or less anyway. I just 
had a chance to recommend the National 
Christian Association and Cynosure at 
our Conference, where lodges were dis- 
cussed and warned against. God bless 



you. 



(Rev.) B. E. Bergeson. 
Seattle, Washington. 



EASTERN SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

REV. W. B. STODDARD. 

Twice each year it is my custom to 
work in and around the great metropolis 
of the Empire state. In New York one 
is brought into touch with people from 
the ends of the earth. I have been at- 



tending conventions, conferences, pres- 
byteries, missions, and other meetings 
where I was permitted to present the N. 
C. A. message. 

On my return from the Virginia work, 
which I reported last month, I went to 
Charles county, Maryland, where I de- 
livered two antilodge addresses in the 
Friends church at Hugesville, and I also 
gave a talk to the Sabbath school of a 
M. E. Church South in the country. The 
lesson was about Daniel, which gave an 
opportunity to speak against the lodge. 

Since coming to this section I have 
spoken in the First Free Methodist 
church, Brooklyn, New Y'ork.; the Alad- 
ison Avenue Christian Reformed church 
and Star of Hope 2\Iission, Paterson, 
New Jersey ; North Side Christian Re- 
formed church, Passaic, New Jersey; 
Christian Reformed church, Englewood, 
New Jersey, and the Free Gospel church, 
Corona, Long Island, New Y^ork. I was 
also given a kindly hearing before a dis- 
trict conference of our Missouri Luth- 
eran friends meeting in Astoria, Long 
Island, New Y'ork, and attended and dis- 
tributed our literature at noon and other 
prayer meetings. At the convention of 
the Christian and ^lissionary Alliance, I 
was privileged to hear Dr. A. B. Simp- 
son, on "Bringing back the King,"' and 
Dr. J. M. Gray on "What the Bible says 
about Russia." ]\Iany returned mission- 
aries and mission workers told of ex- 
periences evincing the power of Christ 
to save. So far as I could discover none 
of these people were in favor of lodges. 

The Christian Reformed churches 
stood by us as they always do with con- 
tributions and Cynosure subscriptions. 
In connection with my visit to the Free 
^Methodist church it was my privilege to 
spend two hours- in company with one 
of their aged ministers. Rev. William 
Gould. Brother Gould is a marvelous 
man. Though blind and eighty-six years 
of age, he writes every week for four 
or five religious journa